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Education Courses

Adult Education Graduate Diploma Courses

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must have completed at least 15 credits in their program of study, including ADIP 500 Adult Education in Quebec as a Field of Study prior to enrolling. This course is associated with, and normally represents, a prerequisite for Integrative Internship II.

Description: Integrative Internship I is designed to allow students to build on their acquired knowledge, skills, values and attitudes through interaction with a chosen education environment. The first Internship requires students to select, contact and establish a working relation with an organization which offers educational activities to adults in their community. A supervised Special Project for an adult education provider is initiated. At this stage, the emphasis is on observation and information gathering, in preparation for taking on a more active role in Integrative Internship II.

Component(s): Lecture; Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ADIP 585.

Description: This internship is designed to extend the student’s personal aims and philosophy of adult education arrived at in Integrative Internship I by completing a supervised Special Project in an approved adult education facility, where supervision is provided by a member of a host institution in consultation with the professor.

Component(s): Lecture; Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must have completed at least 18 credits in the Diploma in Adult Education Teacher Certification Option II prior to enrolling. Students enrolling in this practicum are expected to have completed courses in theoretical and conceptual content in the field of adult education.

Description: This course is designed for students who possess a Provincial Teaching Authorization or are currently working in adult education in the Quebec school system. This practicum provides an opportunity in which they can apply this knowledge to their classroom teaching experience.

Notes:
  • Upon presentation of a statement from the school authority attesting to the satisfactory performance in an adult education classroom for a minimum of four months, a student may be exempted from this course.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ADIP 593.

Description: This course is designed for students who possess a Provisional Teaching Authorization or are currently working in adult education in the Quebec school system. Satisfactory classroom performance in the student’s subject matter specialty is judged on the basis of reports from the school principal, mentors chosen from the teaching staff, and a supervisor from the University.

Also listed as ESTU 676.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Component(s): Lecture

Also listed as ESTU 677

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Component(s): Lecture

Instructional Technology Graduate Diploma Courses

A number of courses selected from the following list will be offered in either summer, fall or winter terms.

Required Courses

A number of courses selected from the following list will be offered in either summer, fall or winter terms.

Description: The primary goal of the course is for students to develop a critical understanding of classic and contemporary theories of learning, such as behaviourism, cognitivism, neo-cognitivism, and socio-constructivism as they inform instructional practice. Secondary course goals include enhancing students' abilities to: a) read and evaluate the primary literature in the area; b) present and write within the discipline; c) evaluate applications of theory to practice; and d) collaborate professionally including via computer conferencing.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course introduces students to instructional design, which refers to both the systematic process for preparing learning materials as well as to the theories and principles that guide that work.  Working on a real-world project, students directly engage in the process and prepare an instructional program.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 512/712 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ETEC 550.

Description: Building on the base of instructional design, this course introduces human performance technology (HPT). HPT is a set of principles and methods for identifying and solving problems that cannot be solved through instructional programs alone. Working on a real-world project, students design a variety of non-instructional interventions.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 512/712 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course prepares students to integrate into the real-world practice of educational technology and to eventually assume leadership positions in organizations. Through readings, experiential learning activities, and other assignments, this course introduces students to the basic themes of administering educational technology groups: (a) business management—successfully competing for work and resources needed to complete it; (b) project management—planning work and overseeing its progress; and (c) people management—establishing and managing expectations of, and relationships with, members of the group.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 591/701 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course focuses on project management and its application to the fields of education and training. Special attention is made on the different components of a project, but reviews of project management as a discipline, a process and a system are also undertaken. Following the established methodology proposed by national and international project management organizations, this course introduces the processes, skills, techniques and software tools required to effectively manage a project. Specific educational examples and cases of real-life projects are included in the course to describe how project management techniques can be used in education and training.

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 594/704 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ETEC 550.

Description: This course prepares educational technologists to adopt the consultative approach that is central to the profession. Specifically, this course develops the key competencies needed in consultative work in schools, higher education, workplace learning groups and non-profit organizations. These competencies include building awareness of the client organization, supporting clients in making effective choices, developing agreements with clients that include the scope, schedule and budget of projects, managing project communications and changes throughout a project, and interacting effectively with clients.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 673 or for this topic under an ETEC 593 or ETEC 693 number may not take this course for credit.

Elective Courses

The department currently offers the courses listed below. The pattern of courses offered may vary from year to year. Detailed information on the courses offered in a given year is available from the department.

Description: There are a number of important philosophical questions that lie behind the everyday practice of education research. The questions include: What does it mean to say that research in education is “scientific”? Is science (and, by extension, educational research) really value neutral and objective? What kinds of education research should count as legitimate? In the first part of the course, various definitions of science, for example, those of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn, and some influential critiques of the scientific enterprise are examined. In the second part of the course, some of the ongoing debates about appropriate research methods in education are analyzed.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 506/606 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course provides an introduction to research methodologies germane to the field of educational technology. Students acquire competencies in analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating empirical research that employ quantitative, qualitative and mixed methodologies. Special emphasis is placed on acquiring skills to critique and review literature in educational technology.

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 548/648 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ETEC 540.

Description: In this course students develop a proposal, design a pilot study to investigate a research problem, and later analyze the data. Projects may use quantative or qualitative methodologies.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 548/648 may not take this course for credit.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 567/667 may not take this course for credit.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 555/655 may not take this course for credit.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 592/702 may not take this course for credit.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Applied Linguistics MA Courses

Description: This course examines the different theoretical concepts and methods used to analyze and describe the linguistic structure of language, and explores ways in which these can be applied to the teaching of second languages. The course introduces students to the key concepts that characterize the different components of language, namely phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics, within an approach that recognizes that languages can be affected by the social, psychological, and pragmatic aspects of human behaviour.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Research in second language acquisition (SLA) is surveyed in this course. Students read, critique, and discuss a number of research reports and survey articles on topics including research techniques in SLA, individual differences believed to affect success in second language learning (e.g., age, motivation), the systematicity of learner language (interlanguage, developmental sequences), the influence of learners’ first language on the structure of their interlanguage, the development of general theories of SLA. The course concludes with a discussion of SLA research carried out in classroom settings.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: The principal aims of the course are to enable students better to evaluate reports of empirical research in the language sciences and to plan limited studies of their own. Emphasis is placed upon the logic of research designs, the nature of scientific proof, and the assumptions underlying data analytic procedures. Case studies of published research, readings and lectures illustrate the concepts of data, scales, models, sampling, theory, description, estimation and significance testing.

Component(s): Lecture

Cluster Courses

Cluster A: Focus on Theory

Description: This course is an introduction to educational and sociolinguistic issues affecting the promotion and maintenance of individual and societal bilingualism, multilingualism, and multiculturalism. The societal consequences of being multilingual and multicultural and the perspectives of both students and educators in multilingual/multicultural language classrooms will be examined.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for APLI 642 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: APLI 660.

Description: This course examines issues in second language acquisition and bilingualism/multilingualism from a cognitive (psycholinguistic) perspective. The aim of the course is to familiarize students with basic psycholinguistic concepts of language representation and use, focusing on the learning of different aspects of language, the role of attention and memory in language acquisition, the development of language comprehension and production skills, and the cognitive consequences of bilingualism/multilingualism. Throughout the course, emphasis is given to understanding research methodologies used in psycholinguistic investigations.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for APLI 642 may not take this course for credit.

Description: The acquisition of a second language is a process that is inherently variable due to factors such as the influence of the learner’s first language, the target language, extralinguistic variables, and other factors. This course examines the interplay of these variables, focusing on current research in variable second language acquisition and on the pedagogical implications and applications of this knowledge for second language teaching.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under an APLI 651 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: The course provides an overview of learners’ individual differences in cognitive, social, affective, and motivational variables and the role of those differences in second language teaching and learning. Course topics may include language aptitude, motivation, learning and cognitive styles, personality, and language learning strategies. The course offers a research-based framework for understanding how individual differences impact language learning for different learners in various learning contexts.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under an APLI 651 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: APLI 604.

Description: This course provides an overview of different perspectives that have been taken on the ways previously learned languages affect the learning of subsequent languages. Topics include: the contrastive analysis and error analysis approaches; avoidance; markedness; selective, bidirectional, and conceptual transfer; and factors affecting cross-linguistic influence among trilingual and multilingual speakers. Throughout the course, the implications for language teaching of the theoretical perspectives and empirical findings are considered.

Component(s): Lecture

Cluster B: Focus on Language

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: APLI 604.

Description: This course is an introduction to second language phonology, with emphasis on how theoretical knowledge and research can be applied to the teaching of pronunciation in traditional and computer-based environments. This course familiarizes students with the English sound system and associated phonetic phenomena, research in the development of second language phonology, and key concepts in phonemic representation, production and perception.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: APLI 604.

Description: The course provides an overview of research perspectives on second language vocabulary acquisition. Topics include the characteristics of lexis, the structure of the mental lexicon, implicit and explicit learning, and issues in assessment. The course also outlines a research-informed approach to instruction: in addition to examining both old and new techniques for teaching vocabulary, it explores developments in corpus linguistics that are relevant to vocabulary instruction and materials design.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: APLI 604.

Description: This course surveys the theoretical and empirical literature related to the teaching and learning of grammar in second language classrooms. Topics include the nature of pedagogical rules, the use of metalinguistic terminology, teachers’ knowledge and beliefs, learner characteristics, task types, and sequencing. Students also study a grammar structure in depth for which they subsequently develop, pilot, and critically evaluate a set of instructional materials.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course focuses on current research and practice in language awareness relating to language teaching and learning for a variety of learners in different contexts. Topics may include the learning of first, second and additional languages, language teaching methodology, language teacher education, attitudes towards language, cross-linguistic and cross-cultural awareness, and critical language awareness. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on both the theoretical and practical implications of language awareness.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under an APLI 651 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: The course provides an overview of pragmatics, which includes topics ranging from reference, implicature, presupposition, speech acts, information structure, and conversational structure. The course also provides a research-informed approach to the study of these topics in second language learning contexts, exploring developments in second language research that are relevant to the understanding of pragmatics.

Component(s): Lecture

Cluster C: Focus on Pedagogy

Description: The course provides an overview of several topics in second language listening and speaking such as fluency, formulaic language, strategies, and inferencing. The course provides a research-informed approach to second language listening and speaking, exploring trends in second language acquisition research and pedagogy that are relevant to the understanding of skill development.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: The aims of the course are to examine the evolution of the syllabus in second language teaching and to consider issues related to the development, planning and implementation of language programs in a range of educational settings. Topics include the history of second language teaching; current issues in pedagogical practice; assessment of student needs; and the design, sequencing, and evaluation of language teaching materials.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for APLI 638 may not take this course for credit.

Description: The course provides an overview of theory and research that informs language testing. Students explore historical developments in language assessment as well as current trends. The course enables them to critically evaluate a range of test types including standardized placement instruments, diagnostic tests, progress/achievement measures, and non-traditional assessment techniques. Students are guided in designing sample tests; they are also familiarized with established methods for analyzing test items and interpreting results.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course explores theoretical and applied issues related to the use of technology in second language learning and teaching. The principal aims of the course are to enable students to critically evaluate existing instructional uses of technology and to design methodologically sound technology-based materials for second language teaching. Emphasis is placed on developing skills needed for the integration of instructional technology into second language instruction.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course examines the development of reading and writing abilities in a second language, including the connections between the two. It discusses literacy issues pertaining to different age groups and proficiency levels, including university students acquiring advanced academic writing skills. Throughout the course, the implications for language teaching of the different theoretical and empirical findings will be considered.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course is designed for students who have some ESL teaching experience and a particular interest in working in the field of teacher training. The course has both a practical and a theoretical component. In the practical component, students observe and assist novice ESL teachers; in the theoretical component, students meet weekly in an academic seminar.

Component(s): Lecture

Applied Linguistics Elective Courses

Each year the department offers a selection of courses from those listed below.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: APLI 660.

Description: The principal aims of the course are to enable students to evaluate the statistical information provided in reports of empirical research in the social sciences and use statistics in small scale studies. Emphasis is placed upon the logic of statistical tests, the assumptions underlying their use, and the interpretation of the results. The course also includes basic elements of data analysis and synthesis in research employing qualitative methodologies.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under an APLI 651 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course provides an advanced treatment of specialized literature in an area of Applied Linguistics.

Component(s): Lecture

Applied Linguistics Thesis and Research Courses

Component(s): Thesis Research

Description: An oral thesis defence is not required for this program.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Notes:
  • Please refer to the Thesis regulations section for further information on the master’s thesis evaluation.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Child Studies MA Courses

The following courses are offered:

Required Courses

These courses are required of all students and form the foundation for further courses in the program.

Description: This course presents an overview of the theories that have helped to shape the field of child development. The impact of various theoretical approaches (e.g., psychoanalytic, cognitive, behavioral, social) is examined by providing perspectives on issues of both historical and contemporary importance.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course provides students with an overview of the field of child studies. Students are introduced to diverse issues through the work of program faculty, invited scholars and student initiatives.

Component(s): Seminar

Description: This course introduces students to the philosophy, principles, and techniques in quantitative inquiry in the social sciences. Specifically, it focuses on the main quantitative methodologies of inquiry that are necessary for conducting research and interpreting data in child studies. The course covers techniques for addressing quantitative research questions in the field, including gathering, organizing, analyzing, and communicating data. Statistical techniques that are commonly used to address such questions are covered, with appropriate computer software for key methodologies. Laboratory work is provided to give students practical experience with such software.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for CHST 607 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course introduces students to the philosophy, principles, and approaches in qualitative inquiry in the social sciences. Specifically, it focuses on the main methodologies of inquiry that are necessary for conducting and interpreting qualitative data in child studies. The course covers techniques for addressing qualitative research questions in the field, including gathering, organizing, analyzing, and communicating data. Appropriate methods for the coding and analysis of qualitative data are covered, with laboratory work to support students’ practical experience with qualitative data.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for CHST 607 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: CHST 605 and CHST 606; or equivalent.

Description: This course addresses a range of observational techniques for observing children in their natural environments (e.g., running records, time and event sampling, rating scales). Students learn to use a variety of observational methods, analyze the information, and write reports. Students spend approximately 2-3 hours weekly in an appropriate setting to conduct the observations.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for CHST 604 may not take this course for credit.

Elective Courses

These courses focus on the child and the wider community. They are offered on a rotating basis.

Description: This course provides an overview of the ways in which cognition has contributed to the understanding of how children engage in the content of school subjects, such as mathematics, science, literacy and history. Topics include general cognitive processes, such as memory, transfer, metacognition, and expertise, as well as those related to learning in specific content areas. The course examines ways in which theory and empirical findings can and have informed instructional practice.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course addresses issues regarding the development of critical social processes in the life of the child, which have implications for later functioning. Topics include the importance of early emotional development (e.g., attachment, temperament, emotional regulation) for social interaction, peer relations (e.g., friendships, bullying and victimization, prosocial behaviour), the development of self and social understanding, the role of play in development, and gender roles and socialization.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course examines a variety of extra-familial settings in which children and families function (e.g. child care, kindergarten, elementary school, after school programs, recreation programs, hospital settings, programs for children with special needs). Various aspects of these programs are examined such as mission statements, program philosophy, training requirements, regulations, and professional development requirements. Methods to evaluate the quality of the settings are presented. Students learn to analyze a specific program of their choosing and write a case study report. Guest lectures and field trips to different types of settings may form part of the course.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course introduces students to the topic of play with an emphasis on relating theory to practice. Historical and modern theories (e.g., psychoanalytic, cognitive, and social cognitive) of play are discussed. Various definitions and types of play that emanate from theoretical approaches and different approaches to measuring play are covered, as well as the relationship between children’s play and domains of development and culture, and curriculum and teaching. Issues related to designing developmentally appropriate play spaces and materials are examined.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course addresses major theoretical perspectives on family functioning and the nature of parenting (e.g., transitions to parenting, attachment, child rearing styles, parenting children with special needs) and family relationships (e.g., parent-child, sibling, grandparents). Issues related to the modern Canadian family are also discussed (e.g., single and adolescent parents, divorce and remarriage, parental employment, child care, transition to school, and diversity of family lifestyles).

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course examines principles and models of curriculum in relation to a range of early childhood settings, including daycare, after school programming, kindergarten, and elementary school. The focus is on analyzing current curriculum models from different perspectives as well as identifying and discussing issues related to curriculum design and implementation. Student interests and areas of study are taken into account in the selection of the readings, interactive curriculum materials, and resources.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for CHST 601 may not take this course for credit.

Description: In this course, students reflect on specific aspects of cognitive development and their impact on education. Topics are offered on a rotating basis and may include the development of language, literacy, numeracy and/or scientific reasoning. The literature on selected topics is examined, with particular emphasis on both classic and current research.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course examines theoretical issues in inclusive and special education and focuses on educational practices that provide all children with equitable access to learning. Curricula, policies and practices in educational settings are analyzed and provide students with an in-depth understanding so as to meet the needs of diverse learners.

Component(s): Lecture

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course provided that the course content has changed.

Internship and Directed Study Courses

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Permission of the Graduate Program Director is required.

Description: Students may enrol in a directed study under faculty supervision in order to undertake specialized study of theoretical or research-related topics.

Component(s): Reading

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses or equivalent must be completed previously: CHST 605 and CHST 606.

Description: The internship is designed to provide students with the opportunity to investigate an applied problem or topical issue in child studies. Course requirements include a seminar in both terms. In the first term, students are required to keep a journal, conduct on-site observations, and formulate a written proposal for the internship project. In the second term, students will conduct their project and maintain their journal. Students are required to spend a minimum of 75 hours in the field placement in the first term and an additional 125 hours (minimum) in their second term.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Description: The final report is a detailed record of the internship project and includes a description and analysis of all work produced for the field placement. In addition, all instruments, curricular materials, journal entries, and other supporting documents are included in the final report.

Component(s): Research

Thesis Courses

Description: Under the supervision of a thesis supervisor, the student writes a proposal presenting a research topic; the overall goal of which is to demonstrate that the student is capable of undertaking an independent research project.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Description: The thesis consists of the formulation and presentation of the research results which are then defended before a committee consisting of the student’s supervisor and at least two other scholars from the department and/or scholars from relevant disciplines in other departments or institutions.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Educational Studies MA Courses

Courses listed indicate the full range of offerings. They are offered subject to the availability of faculty, and (with the exception of a minimum of six core courses) not all in a given year.

Core Courses

Specific topic areas of study include: Issues of Difference: Gender, Class and Race; politics and education; class, culture and education; educational problems in historical and philosophical perspectives; minority status and learning; literacy; inter-cultural and cross-cultural education; school and society; curriculum, popular culture and education; and comparative and intercultural education. Courses listed indicate the full range of offerings. They are offered subject to the availability of faculty and (with the exception of a minimum of six core courses) not all in a given year.

Description: There are a number of important philosophical questions that lie behind the everyday practice of education research. The questions include: What does it mean to say that research in education is “scientific”? Is science (and, by extension, educational research) really value neutral and objective? What kinds of education research should count as legitimate? In the first part of the course, various definitions of science, for example, those of Karl Popper and Thomas Kuhn, and some influential critiques of the scientific enterprise are examined. In the second part of the course, some of the ongoing debates about appropriate research methods in education are analyzed.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:

Description: This course is a forum for common inquiry and reflection upon issues that have deep significance for our lives as human beings, students, and educators. Some emphasis is placed on gaining an understanding of historically significant philosophical positions and their application to problems of teaching and education. However, the primary focus is on cultivating a desire and commitment to engage in philosophical thinking as it applies to matters of concern to teachers and teaching. The course is premised on a number of questions. These include but are not limited to: What is education? How do we understand education in its moral, ethical and spiritual dimensions? What role does education play (or have the potential of playing) in personal and social transformation? What is effective teaching and how can we cultivate the courage to teach effectively?

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course acquaints students with a broad historical approach to a variety of significant educational issues. The emphasis will be placed on the examination of a number of critical components of modern educational thought and practice (comprising e.g., alternative schools of educational thought, politics and education, the changing curriculum, or the organization of schooling) as seen and presented in historical perspective.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: The course introduces the students to qualitative methods in educational research. The first purpose is to review studies of education which utilize anthropological concepts and/or methods. The second purpose is to examine the three principal foci of qualitative research in the area: a. schools and their relations with the socio-cultural milieu in which they exist; b. the description and analysis of classroom processes; c. the study of individual pupils and educators. The third purpose is to assess the strengths and weaknesses of studies focusing on these areas. This includes describing and discussing some of the systematic methodological biases apparent in the literature and suggesting directions for future research.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: The course provides a basic understanding of the ways in which psychologists examine and analyze human behaviour, collect and interpret data, develop theories and form generalizations. It is not intended as a general survey course in the area of educational psychology. Several topics in an area will be studied in order to exemplify the methods and techniques employed in the psychological analysis of behaviour in educational settings.

Description: By providing an overview of the commonly used research methods in education today, students gain the knowledge required to critique research that is reported in the education and social science literature. Topics include the nature of educational research, the different qualitative and quantitative research approaches, types of data collection, and knowledge of research ethics. Students gain experience in developing a research statement and writing a research proposal.

Description: This course is concerned with the investigation and comparison of problems of education in the context of time and society. Concentrating on concrete “case studies” chosen from the 19th century and the contemporary period, it focuses on the principles on which systems of education are constructed, and their change or retention, in the broad socio-economic and ideological context.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course is concerned with the family, the educational system, the economy and the polity, and with the relations between them. The main concern is with social institutions and the socialization process with which they are involved. Particular emphasis will be placed on the social class differentials in the conditions of socialization and educational opportunity, and on social class differentials in educational achievement.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course is designed as a survey at an advanced level, of the theory and practice of adult education through an examination of the existing literature. Emphasis will be placed on helping the student gain knowledge, understanding, and a critical perspective of the following: aims; history and philosophy; needs and characteristics of adult learners; functions and skills of adult education practitioners; settings, agencies and program areas; and planning and evaluation in adult education. A Canadian and Quebec perspective will be emphasized.

Component(s): Lecture

Topics Courses

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with ADIP 597.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with ADIP 598.

General Courses (All Options)

Thesis and Directed Study Courses

Philosophical and Theoretical Foundations of Educational Technology

ETEC 607

Psychological Aspects of Educational Technology

ETEC 613

Communication Theory

ETEC 621

Development and Evaluation of Curriculum and Educational Materials Research

ETEC 635 ETEC 636 ETEC 637

Research Methodology for Educational Technology

ETEC 640 ETEC 641

Instructional Design and Performance Technology

ETEC 650 ETEC 651 ETEC 652

Educational Computing

ETEC 660 ETEC 662 ETEC 665 ETEC 666 ETEC 669

Management of Performance and Improvement

ETEC 671 ETEC 672 ETEC 673 ETEC 676

Distance Education and E-Learning

ETEC 680 ETEC 681

Field Experience and Research in Educational Technology

ETEC 690 ETEC 691 ETEC 692 ETEC 693

Thesis and Internship in Educational Technology

ETEC 791 ETEC 792 ETEC 795 ETEC 796

Core Courses

Description: The primary goal of the course is for students to develop a critical understanding of classic and contemporary theories of learning, such as behaviourism, cognitivism, neo-cognitivism, and socio-constructivism as they inform instructional practice. Secondary course goals include enhancing students' abilities to: a) read and evaluate the primary literature in the area; b) present and write within the discipline; c) evaluate applications of theory to practice; and d) collaborate professionally including via computer conferencing.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course provides an introduction to research methodologies germane to the field of educational technology.  Students acquire competencies in analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating empirical research that employ quantitative, qualitative and mixed methodologies.  Special emphasis is placed on acquiring skills to critique and review literature in educational technology.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 548/648 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ETEC 640.

Description: The principal aims of the course are to enable students to evaluate the statistical information provided in reports of empirical research in the social sciences and use statistics in small scale studies. Emphasis is placed upon the logic of statistical tests, the assumptions underlying their use, and the interpretation of the results. The course also includes basic elements of data analysis and synthesis in research employing qualitative methodologies.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 548/648 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course introduces students to instructional design, which refers to both the systematic process for preparing learning materials as well as to the theories and principles that guide that work. Working on a real-world project, students directly engage in the process and prepare an instructional program.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 512/712 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ETEC 650.

Description: Building on the base of instructional design, this course introduces human performance technology (HPT). HPT is a set of principles and methods for identifying and solving problems that cannot be solved through instructional programs alone.  Working on a real-world project, students design a variety of non-instructional interventions.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 512/712 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course prepares students to integrate into the real-world practice of educational technology and to eventually assume leadership positions in organizations.  Through readings, experiential learning activities, and other assignments, this course introduces students to the basic themes of administering educational technology groups:  (a) business management—successfully competing for work and resources needed to complete it; (b) project management—planning work and overseeing its progress; and (c) people management—establishing and managing expectations of, and relationships with, members of the group.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 591/701 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course focuses on project management and its application to the fields of education and training.  Special attention is placed on the different components of a project, but reviews of project management as a discipline, a process and a system are also undertaken. Following the established methodology proposed by national and international project management organizations, this course introduces the processes, skills, techniques and software tools required to effectively manage a project.  Specific educational examples and cases of real-life projects are included in the course to describe how project management techniques can be used in education and training.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 594/704 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ETEC 650.

Description: This course prepares educational technologists to adopt the consultative approach that is central to the profession. Specifically, this course develops the key competencies needed in consultative work in schools, higher education, workplace learning groups and non-profit organizations. These competencies include building awareness of the client organization, supporting clients in making effective choices, developing agreements with clients that include the scope, schedule and budget of projects, managing project communications and changes throughout a project, and interacting effectively with clients.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under an ETEC 693 number may not take this course for credit.
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 573 or for this topic under an ETEC 593 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: The internship normally consists of an extensive activity (minimum 675 hours) in the university or in the field. The experience will vary with the interests of the student and the opportunities available. The objectives are: to apply skills acquired in program courses; to obtain more "real world" experience with the actual practice of educational technology; and to undertake a synthesizing process which combines the subjects studied separately within the program in a single undertaking. Students may need to fulfill French or other language training when undertaking an internship or a field experience. Language competencies are determined and assessed by the hosting organization; it is the student's responsibility to attain the competency level required.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Description: The internship report will address both the scholarly/academic and professional practice aspects of Educational Technology. Typically 10,000 or more words in length, the report should contain at least two parts: 1. A detailed description of the Internship II activities, utilizing a case study format; including relevant references to the literature. 2. A conclusions and recommendations section which outlines what was learned, what one would do differently, and what potentially generalizable principles one might recommend to fellow educational technologists encountering similar circumstances. The student completes the internship by disseminating the experiences detailed in the report in a public presentation.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Component(s): Thesis Research

Elective Courses

The department currently offers the courses listed below. The pattern of courses offered may vary from year to year. Detailed information on the courses offered in a given year is available from the department.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ESTU 601 may not take this course for credit.
  • Students who have received credit for ADIP 501 or ETEC 507 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course develops the professional instructional writing skills needed by educational technologists. Specifically, it emphasizes basic instructional writing skills and how to adjust messages for particular audiences and media, and different genres (formats) of instructional materials.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 535/ETEC 635 may not take this course for credit. Students who have received credit for this topic under an ETEC 593/ ETEC 693 number may not take this course for credit.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 606 may not take this course for credit.
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 506 may not take this course for credit.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 667 may not take this course for credit.
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 567 may not take this course for credit.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have have received credit for ETEC 655 may not take this course for credit.
  • Students who have have received credit for ETEC 555 may not take this course for credit.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ETEC 592/702 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: This course is restricted to students enrolled in the Educational Technology MA with Thesis option.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Education PhD Courses

Required Courses

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: ETEC 641 or CHST 605. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of instructor is required.

Description: This course builds students' capacity to conduct quantitative research in education at the doctoral level. It covers all topics related to experimental and quasi-experimental design and the application of univariate statistics to educational research problems. In doing so, the course addresses the basic theory underlying quantitative approaches, selection of an initial research question, the types of questions best suited to quantitative methods, managing and analyzing quantitative data, external and internal validity, reliability and objectivity. This course also provides opportunities to analyze quantitative data.

Component(s): Seminar; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for EDUC 802 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course builds students’ capacity to conduct qualitative research in education at the doctoral level. It covers various types of qualitative research, such as ethnography, case studies, content analysis, and naturalistic observation. In doing so, the course addresses the basic theory and philosophy underlying qualitative approaches, selection of an initial research question, the types of questions best suited to qualitative methods, managing qualitative data, qualitative data analysis, and assuring the credibility and trustworthiness of qualitative data.

Component(s): Seminar; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for EDUC 802 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course prepares students to report their research to various stakeholders of educational research, including funding agencies, other researchers, journal editors, policy makers, and the public. Students prepare various research-related documents, and provide peer reviews.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for EDUC 800 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This seminar explores one or more complex issues of education that has implications for Applied Linguistics, Child Studies, Educational Studies, and Educational Technology. During the course, students explore the research and popular literature on the topic, critically examine the epistemological, sociological, and theoretical bases of the literature, and relate the lessons learned to their own proposed research projects.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for EDUC 801 or EDUC 805 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Each candidate must successfully complete the comprehensive examination before being admitted to candidacy for the degree. The comprehensive consists of a written and oral examination that tests the candidate on both general and area specific research. After successfully completing the comprehensive examination, the student is admitted to candidacy for the degree.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Description: The proposal is accepted only after the student is admitted to candidacy.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Description: A doctoral thesis is expected to make an original contribution to knowledge, and be presented in acceptable literary form.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Area Tutorials

The content and format of an area tutorial may vary from year to year, depending on the number of students and the availability of faculty members. All area tutorials involve directed reading, research, seminar presentations, and discussion sessions on selected topics within that problem area.

Area tutorials offered by the Department of Education fall into the following categories:

Educational Technology Area Tutorials
Child Studies Area Tutorials
Educational Studies Area Tutorials
Applied Linguistics Area Tutorials

Child Studies Area Tutorials

Description: Area tutorials in Child Studies are selected from topics that focus on children’s typical and atypical learning and development (e.g., social or cognitive development), in a variety of settings and contexts (e.g., early childhood environments, schools, after-school programs, recreation and community settings, families and peers, special education environments).

Component(s): Tutorial

Description: Area tutorials in Child Studies are selected from topics that focus on children’s typical and atypical learning and development (e.g., social or cognitive development), in a variety of settings and contexts (e.g., early childhood environments, schools, after-school programs, recreation and community settings, families and peers, special education environments).

Component(s): Tutorial

Description: Area tutorials in Child Studies are selected from topics that focus on children’s typical and atypical learning and development (e.g., social or cognitive development), in a variety of settings and contexts (e.g., early childhood environments, schools, after-school programs, recreation and community settings, families and peers, special education environments).

Component(s): Tutorial

Educational Technology Area Tutorials

Description: Area tutorials in Educational Technology are selected from topics related to the application of technology to education and training. These include Human Performance Technology (HPT); theory, development and research in educational media; distance education; educational cybernetics, systems analysis and design; and human resources development.

Component(s): Tutorial

Description: Area tutorials in Educational Technology are selected from topics related to the application of technology to education and training. These include Human Performance Technology (HPT); theory, development and research in educational media; distance education; educational cybernetics, systems analysis and design; and human resources development.

Component(s): Tutorial

Description: Area tutorials in Educational Technology are selected from topics related to the application of technology to education and training. These include Human Performance Technology (HPT); theory, development and research in educational media; distance education; educational cybernetics, systems analysis and design; and human resources development.

Component(s): Tutorial

Educational Studies Area Tutorials

Description: Area tutorials in Educational Studies consist of philosophical, historical, social psychological, sociological and anthropological aspects of education locally, nationally, and internationally. These may include, but are not limited to, comparative study or early childhood education thought and practice, multicultural education, policy and practice in diverse school settings, curriculum issues and indigenous knowledge, mediated learning environments, curriculum theory, moral education, issues of difference in sexual orientation, class, race, and gender.

Component(s): Tutorial

Description: Area tutorials in Educational Studies consist of philosophical, historical, social psychological, sociological and anthropological aspects of education locally, nationally, and internationally. These may include, but are not limited to, comparative study or early childhood education thought and practice, multicultural education, policy and practice in diverse school settings, curriculum issues and indigenous knowledge, mediated learning environments, curriculum theory, moral education, issues of difference in sexual orientation, class, race, and gender.

Component(s): Tutorial

Description: Area tutorials in Educational Studies consist of philosophical, historical, social psychological, sociological and anthropological aspects of education locally, nationally, and internationally. These may include, but are not limited to, comparative study or early childhood education thought and practice, multicultural education, policy and practice in diverse school settings, curriculum issues and indigenous knowledge, mediated learning environments, curriculum theory, moral education, issues of difference in sexual orientation, class, race, and gender.

Component(s): Tutorial

Applied Linguistics Area Tutorials

Description: Area tutorials in Applied Linguistics consist of a variety of topics related to second-language learning and teaching. More specifically they may focus on interlanguage development; teaching of pronunciation; role of routinization in language acquisition; acquisition of second language vocabulary; teaching and learning of second language phonology.

Component(s): Tutorial

Description: Area tutorials in Applied Linguistics consist of a variety of topics related to second-language learning and teaching. More specifically they may focus on interlanguage development; teaching of pronunciation; role of routinization in language acquisition; acquisition of second language vocabulary; teaching and learning of second language phonology.

Component(s): Tutorial

Description: Area tutorials in Applied Linguistics consist of a variety of topics related to second-language learning and teaching. More specifically they may focus on interlanguage development; teaching of pronunciation; role of routinization in language acquisition; acquisition of second language vocabulary; teaching and learning of second language phonology.

Component(s): Tutorial

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