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Sociology and Anthropology Courses

Social and Cultural Anthropology MA Courses

Description:

This course explores the processes of social differentiation and identification.

Component(s):

Seminar

Description:

This course examines the roots of anthropological theory in Western culture and the decolonization of anthropology since the 1960s.

Component(s):

Seminar

Description:

This course explores the methods and ethical dimensions of ethnographic research and representation.

Component(s):

Seminar

Description:

This course examines a range of methods and styles for presenting ethnographic material, from ethnographic realism to fiction, and encourages further experimentation.

Component(s):

Seminar

Description:

This course explores emergent concepts, methods and topics in anthropology. Content changes in accordance with the research focus of the professor leading the course.

Component(s):

Seminar

Description:

This course, selected in consultation with the student’s thesis supervisor, may be taken from a cognate discipline.

Component(s):

Tutorial

Notes:


  • Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course provided that the course content has changed.

Description:

This course, selected in consultation with the student’s thesis supervisor, is offered as the occasion arises, for example, when a faculty member returns from the field, or when a visiting professor is in residence.

Component(s):

Tutorial

Notes:


  • Subject matter varies from term to term and from year to year. Students may re-register for this course provided that the course content has changed.

Description:

This seminar is designed to help students develop the professional skills needed to pursue a career in research, practice or teaching. Students are exposed to a variety of research approaches through presentations by a diversity of faculty researchers.

Component(s):

Seminar

Notes:


  • This seminar takes place every two weeks over the course of the Fall and Winter semesters.

Description:

Students enrolled in the thesis - field research option are required to demonstrate their ability to carry out independent ethnographic field research. Students develop a research proposal under the direction of their thesis supervisor, which serves as the basis for ANTH 6910 and ANTH 6920. The field research proposal serves as a basis of the written thesis. Students then orally defend the thesis - field research before an examining committee.

Component(s):

Thesis Research

Description:

This guided seminar is the first stage in the thesis- bibliographic research that is completed in ANTH 6950. Under the direction of the supervisor, students prepare a bibliographic research proposal that includes a preliminary reading list.

Component(s):

Thesis Research

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously:ANTH 6910.

Description:

The thesis - field research is required to demonstrate that the student has been able to carry out independent field research. It should be a work of near publishable quality. The thesis is evaluated by the student’s Thesis Committee and one other faculty member. The student is also required to defend the thesis orally before the above-mentioned examiners.

Component(s):

Thesis Research

Notes:


  • Students who have received credit for ANTH 692 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be taken previously or concurrently: ANTH 690.

Description:

The fieldwork requirement, which may last from three to four months, involves undertaking research in a community which differs in important respects from the student’s communities of reference, and collecting ethnographic data. This research forms the basis of the student’s thesis.

Component(s):

Fieldwork; In Person (P)

Notes:


  • Students who have taken ANTH 691 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: ANTH 693.

Description:

Under the direction of the supervisor, students review the literature (which may include both academic and grey literature sources) which forms the basis of the students' thesis - bibliographic research that is completed in ANTH 6950.

Component(s):

Thesis Research

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Description:

Students are required to write the thesis - bibliographic research under the supervision of one faculty member and are evaluated by two faculty members, including the supervisor. It can either be a literature review of a substantive nature, or a report on empirical research. Students are expected to submit work of publishable or near publishable quality.

Component(s):

Thesis Research

Sociology MA Courses

Description:

This course is designed to examine selected classical texts and analyze the work of recent interpreters and critics. During this course, we will endeavour to develop our critical understanding of the classics. In addition, we will strive to create an awareness of the diversity of readings of classical texts that will enhance our ability to make further critical appropriations, revisions, and uses of the classical tradition.

Component(s):

Seminar

Description:

This course is an in-depth study of issues in contemporary sociological theory. It is designed to foster awareness of the plurality, diversity, and divergence among contemporary readers and readings of current texts. The focus is on critical analysis of major writings representing diverse theoretical orientations in recent sociology. Attention is given to fundamental assumptions and to practical implications of given orientations and styles of sociology.

Component(s):

Seminar

Description:

This course explores quantitative research design and methodology as a whole process, from conceptualization to research questions, methods, data analysis, and results dissemination. Topics include data structures and their relation to theory; data collection; access to and use of large data sets; coding and validity and reliability issues; statistical techniques as generalized linear models; linear and logistic regression. Students apply various methods to read data. Ethical issues are also considered.

Component(s):

Seminar

Description:

This course explores research methodology, design, analysis and dissemination. Topics include focus groups, participant observation, open-ended and structured interviewing, content and discourse analysis, life histories and historical analysis. Analysis will also explore approaches to coding qualitative data and the links between data and conceptual and theoretical categories. Ethical issues as well as issues of researcher safety in the field are considered.

Component(s):

Seminar

Description:

This seminar is designed to help students develop the professional skills needed to pursue a career in research, practice or teaching. Students are exposed to a variety of research approaches through presentations by a diversity of faculty researchers.

Component(s):

Seminar

Notes:


  • This course is graded as pass/fail.
  • This seminar takes place every two weeks over the course of the Fall and Winter semesters.

Description:

Students develop a research proposal under the direction of their thesis supervisor. The research proposed here forms the basis of SOCI 691(Thesis - Primary Research).

Component(s):

Thesis Research

Description:

Students enrolled in the thesis - primary research option are required to demonstrate their ability to carry out independent research. This takes the form of a written thesis of at least article length. Students orally defend the thesis before an examining committee.

Component(s):

Thesis Research

Description:

The thesis - bibliographic research is written under the supervision of one faculty member and is evaluated by two faculty members, including the supervisor. It can either be a literature review of a substantive nature, or a report on empirical research. Students are expected to submit work of publishable or near publishable quality. The appropriate length of the thesis is approximately 40 pages.

Component(s):

Thesis Research

Sociology MA Selected Topics

The offerings for the following courses will be reviewed each year in light of the interest of students and faculty members. Five elective courses are offered each academic year from the list given below. Courses numbered “700” are advanced studies and normally will be conducted on a tutorial basis. The corresponding 600-level course is a prerequisite to the 700-level course.

Component(s):

Seminar

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as  SOCI 720. 

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 722.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 725.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 726.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 727.

Component(s):

Seminar

Notes:



Also listed as SOCI 732.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as  SOCI 733.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 735.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 737.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 738.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 739.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 740.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 742.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 744.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 745.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 746.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 747.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 748.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 749.

Component(s):

Seminar

Component(s):

Seminar

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 752.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 753.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 620.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 622.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 625.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 626.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 627.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 632.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 633.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 635.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 637.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 638

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 639.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 640.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 642.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 644.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 645.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 646.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 647.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 648.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 649.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 650.

Component(s):

Lecture; Tutorial; Reading

Also listed as SOCI 651.

Component(s):

Tutorial; Reading

Also listed as SOCI 750.

Component(s):

Lecture; Tutorial; Reading

Also listed as SOCI 751.

Component(s):

Lecture

Also listed as SOCI 652.

Component(s):

Seminar

Also listed as SOCI 653.

Component(s):

Seminar

Social and Cultural Analysis PhD Courses

Required Courses

Description:

This course focuses on orientating the common epistemological interests of sociological and anthropological approaches to social and cultural analysis in the four areas of specialization. In order to maximize interdisciplinary coverage, the seminar is led by two faculty members, one trained in sociology and one in anthropology.

Component(s):

Seminar

Description:

This course is designed as a seminar in which guest speakers orally present the results of their work and practical information on various professional skills (professionalization). Students are exposed to a variety of research conducted in the two disciplines and acquire communication and teaching skills necessary for working in the real world (defined as both academic and non-academic). Students learn how to present research results to a variety of audiences, how to address issues related to university teaching, and how to deal with ethical issues in the research context. Each week, students must submit a written report on the presentation of the previous week.

Component(s):

Seminar

Notes:


  • The course is graded as Pass/Fail.
  • This course is mandatory for all students in the program.

Description:

Designed as a preparation to the research involved in the thesis, the second general seminar focuses on the development of writing and research capacities, preparing research proposals, addressing issues in theory and method in relation to various topics, covering literature reviews. One faculty member is responsible for this seminar.

Component(s):

Seminar

Description:

Towards the end of their first year in the program, and in consultation with their thesis supervisor, PhD students form an advisory committee of three faculty members, including their supervisor, to assist in the preparation of the comprehensive exams. The core reading list consists of approximately 25 titles. The ultimate goal of the exams is to establish a candidate’s academic specialization. After completing the exam, students should have acquired sufficient background to teach a course and/or conduct advanced research in the area. This examination, as well as SOAN 860 Comprehensive Exam ll, normally take place before the end of the student’s second year in the program. Each exam takes the form of a written essay (20-25 pages) that the student has three weeks to write.

Component(s):

Thesis Research

Notes:


  • The student’s advisory committee members evaluate the exam as earning a grade of pass or fail. To constitute a successful exam, it must receive a grade of pass from all three members of the committee. Students who fail one of these exams are allowed to take it for a second time during the following term. A second failure leads to the student’s withdrawal from the program.
  • All candidates are required to write two 6-credit comprehensive exams. The topics for these exams are set at the end of the first year or beginning of the second year, and the exams completed within the second year of the program. Each comprehensive exam is assessed by a committee of three faculty members drawn from the two disciplines, and formed in consultation with the student's supervisor.

Description:

Towards the end of their first year in the program, and in consultation with their thesis supervisor, PhD students form an advisory committee of three faculty members, including their supervisor, to assist in the preparation of the comprehensive exams. The core reading list consists of approximately 25 titles. The ultimate goal of the exams is to establish a candidate’s academic specialization. After completing the exam, students should have acquired sufficient background to teach a course and/or conduct advanced research in the area. This examination, as well as SOAN 850 Comprehensive Exam l, normally take place before the end of the student’s second year in the program. Each exam takes the form of a written essay (20-25 pages) that the student has three weeks to write.

Component(s):

Thesis Research

Notes:


  • The student’s advisory committee members evaluate the exam as earning a grade of pass or fail. To constitute a successful exam, it must receive a grade of pass from all three members of the committee. Students who fail one of these exams are allowed to take it for a second time during the following term. A second failure leads to the student’s withdrawal from the program.
  • All candidates are required to write two 6-credit comprehensive exams. The topics for these exams are set at the end of the

    first year or beginning of the second year, and the exams completed within the second year of the program. Each

    comprehensive exam is assessed by a committee of three faculty members drawn from the two disciplines, and formed in

    consultation with the student's supervisor.

Description:

A candidate who has successfully completed the course requirements and the comprehensive exams must submit a thesis proposal to the Graduate Program Director and the thesis committee. The thesis committee, selected in consultation with the GPD, is composed of three members representing both Sociology and Anthropology. It may be the student’s initial advisory committee. The thesis proposal should describe the topic of the thesis, situate it in the relevant literature, and discuss the intended research methods. The written version of the proposal is approved by the members of the thesis committee and followed by an oral defense before the committee members. Following this, the PhD candidate is invited to present his thesis proposal in a departmental seminar.

Component(s):

Thesis Research

Description:

Doctoral candidates submit a thesis based on their research and defend it in an oral examination. The thesis is expected to make an original contribution to knowledge, to be based on primary sources and to be presented in an acceptable form. The thesis should normally be no more than 400 pages in length (or equivalent if a non-literary format is used).

Component(s):

Thesis Research

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