Electrical and Computer Engineering Courses

Description: Introduction to the cell and the genome. Foundations of synthetic biology and ethics. Synthetic genomes and metabolic engineering. Model organisms, such as E. coli bacteria, and synthetic cells: self-replicating cells man-made from cloned genes, a cellular membrane and the basic elements of RNA and protein synthesis. Designing computational devices for implementation in biological cells. Introduction to modelling and computer simulation of gene regulatory networks. Methods of building and testing gene regulatory networks within and without cells. Expanding functionality via inter-cellular signaling. Basic interfacing to electronic sensors and actuators. Landmark and interesting applications of synthetic biology in computer engineering and other disciplines. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course. Students who have received credit for COEN 691 or BIOL 631 (Biological Computing and Synthetic Biology) may not take this course for credit.

Description: Software life cycle, software requirements and requirement documentation. Software design: top-down and bottom-up approaches; design validation and design reviews. Software implementation, choice of a programming language and portability. Testing, debugging and verification. Design of test cases. Software documentation and its maintenance. Documentation tools and documentation portability, user interface design. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6311 or COEN 6471 or equivalent.

Description: Model-Driven Architecture (MDA), domain-based system partitioning, Platform-Independent Modelling (PIM), Platform Specific Modelling (PSM), Unified Modelling Language (UML), static and dynamic modelling with UML, UML extension mechanisms, UML profiling, Object Constraint Language (OCL), model transformation, introduction to Query/View/Transformation standard, action specification (OAL), automatic system generation. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6311.

Description: Topics include definition(s) of principles of cloud-based problem solving and programming; autonomy of cloud computing, service and business models, data centres and virtualization; CAP theorem, REST API and data models; MapReduce and programming model, distributed file systems for computer clusters, development environments and tools on clouds; cloud-based access and query; cloud application design principles; applications of cloud service concepts to the design of a real-world Internet service. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under COEN 691 (Programming on the Cloud) may not take this course for credit.

  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course COEN 424. Students who have received credit for COEN 424 may not take this course for credit.

This course is cross-listed with COEN 432. Students who have received credit for COEN 432 may not enrol in this course.

Description: Topics include heuristic learning algorithms applied to real-world problems of design, classification, prediction and abstraction. Genetic algorithms, genetic programming, evolutionary strategies, generative and developmental systems, artificial life approaches, swarm intelligence, self-modifying programs, tabu search, simulated annealing and support vector machines; introduction to deep learning architectures. Examples of practical applications and challenges focused on biological and biomedical engineering. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course. Students who have received credit for the undergraduate equivalent version may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6131.

Description: Fundamentals of artificial neural networks; rigorous analysis of and introduction to various network paradigms: perceptrons, backpropagation, counter-propagation, Hopfield nets, bi-directional associative memories, adaptive resonance theory, cognitron and neocognitron; neural network topologies, memories, learning, stability and convergence; applications to adaptive knowledge, knowledge processing, classification, pattern recognition, signal processing, communications, robotics and control; and assessment of current neural network technology. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course covers embedded systems and the foundations for cyberphysical systems design. It covers embedded hardward (HW) architectures, sensors, actuators, and processors. Other topics include input/output (I/O) and peripherals, memory architectures, and interfacing memory and peripheral. Moreover, it covers hardwaresoftware partitioning, software transformations, floating to fixed point conversion, loop transformations, code compaction, low-power design and embedded system testing. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course COEN 421.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: COEN 6311 and ELEC 6851 or COMP 6461.

Description: The course briefly reviews computer networks and protocols fundamentals including OSI model and the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) stack. Topics covered include communication protocols vs. communication services, protocol modelling techniques such as finite-state machines (FSM) models, Petri net models, hybrid models, temporal logics, protocol specification languages such as Promela, the Specification and Description Language (SDL) and real-time Unified Modeling Language (UML); protocol implementation and design techniques from specification to implementation; protocol verification techniques such as reachability analysis and model checking. The course covers also communication protocol testing including test architectures, test sequence languages and test case generation techniques. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6561.

Description: This course deals with the fundamental principles of machine learning for cyber-physical systems (CPS). The course provides the necessary background, training and information on the fast-evolving field of machine learning and CPS. The course covers machine learning techniques and tools related to applications in CPS: neural networks, deep learning networks, convolutional neural networks, and reinforcement learning as
applied to CPS. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course introduces students to VHDL language and modelling digital circuit with VHDL. Topics include: arithmetic and logic circuits. Storage devices. Finite State Machines. Algorithmic State Machines. Timing issues. Asynchronous Design. VHDL and modelling with VHDL. Synthesis and architectural models for synthesis. Project involving system design and modelling. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Physical design of digital circuits using technologies of Very Large Scale Integration. CMOS and BiCMOS logic blocks. CMOS processing technology, design rules, CAD issues, and limitation of CMOS technologies. Physical layouts and parasitic elements of CMOS circuits. Characterization and performance evaluation. Electrical simulation using HSPICE. Design and implementation of CMOS logic structures, interconnects, and I/O structures, emphasis on optimizing operation speed and/or power dissipation/distribution. Project of circuit design using a specified CMOS technology. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6501 or COEN 6511.

Description: Stuck-at faults, observability, controllability, fault coverage, test vectors, automatic test pattern generation (ATPG), statistical fault analysis, ad-hoc testing, level sensitive scan design (LSSD), serial scan, parallel scan, signature analysis and BILBO, boundary scan, built-in-self-test (BIST), IDDQ testing. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: CIVI 6501 or COEN 6511.

Description: Introduction to high level synthesis; synthesis models. The synthesis process; High Level Description Languages; scheduling; chaining and pipelining; clock optimization and synthesis; I/O synthesis. Behavioral synthesis; architectural trade-offs in power, area and delay. Design flow with FPGAs; design flow with full-custom and semi-custom ASIC’s. A project is required.

This course is cross-listed course with undergraduate course COEN 413. Students who received credit for COEN 413 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6501 or equivalent.

Description: Review of hardware design languages. Definition of functional verification. Design for verification. Writing testbenches, simulation engines, and coverage metrics. Introduction to verification languages. Verification plan: strategies, testcases, testbenches. Modelling verification environments. Modelling input relations, intervals, events. Introduction to formal verification tools. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for COEN 413 may not enrol in this course.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6501.

Description: Design verification technology. Introduction to mathematical logic (propositional, first-order, higher-order). Formal methods. Formal specification and validation. Combinational equivalence checking. Binary decision diagrams: BDD, automata theory, sequential equivalence checking, model theory, temporal logics, model checking, proof theory, predicate logic, theorem proving, formal verification CAD tools. Practical case studies. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for COEN 7501 (Hardware Formal Verification) may not take this course for credit.

Description: Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) consist of interacting networks of physical and computational elements. This course covers the fundamentals of modeling, specification, analysis and design of CPS. Models for computation and physical systems including discrete event dynamic models, finite-state machines (FSMs), extended FSMs, statecharts, Petri nets and continuous variable models are studied. Scheduling and optimization of process networks and hybrid models are covered. Specification, simulation and performance analysis of CPS and the relationship of program execution with physical
time constants are discussed. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course.
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course COEN 422.

Description: Taxonomy of real-time systems; Scheduling algorithms for static and dynamic tasks; Fault-tolerance and reliability; Resource and resource access control; Multiprocessor scheduling, resource access control, and synchronization; Real-time communication, Case studies in distributed real-time systems (e.g., HARTS, MARS, Spring, etc.). A project is required.

Description: Introduction to microprocessors and their architectures. Examples of various microprocessors. Bus and I/O Organizations. Addressing modes. Timing. Software related issues. Memory and its hierarchy. Static and dynamic memory interfacing. Synchronous and asynchronous interfacing. Interrupts. DMA. Use of Co-processors. Single chip Micro-controllers. Examples of microprocessor applications at the system level. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Fundamentals of the design and analysis of fault-tolerant systems, Models for distributed systems, Fault/error models, Techniques for providing hardware/software redundancy, Fault-detection in multi-processors, Stable storage, Recovery strategies for multi-processors (checkpointing), System diagnosis, Software design faults, Experimental validation techniques, Case studies in fault-tolerant distributed systems. A project is required.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6311 and ELEC 6851.

Description: The course covers the distributed system programming paradigms such as threads and input and output (IO) concurrency, data modeling and communicating
techniques, distributed algorithms such as MapReduce and system fault tolerance. Topics include multi threading, I/O concurrency, Remote Procedure Calls (RPC), HTTP/RESTful and ProtocolBuffer, Pub-Sub, message and queue, event-driven, distributed software system design and patterns, distributed file systems, replication, consistency and fault tolerance. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have taken COMP 6231 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Review of basic computer architecture designs. Fundamentals of computer design and performance. Cost issues. Instruction set design principles. Memory hierarchies: registers, caches and virtual memories. Basic processor implementation issues. High performance computing issues such as pipelining, superscalar and vector processing. Input/output subsystem designs. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6561.

Description: The course reviews the various Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) modeling formalisms such as finite-state machines (FSMs), Petri nets, timed automata, discrete and
continuous time models and hybrid models. It also covers advanced modeling languages such as systems modeling language (SysML), unified modeling language (UML) and CPS related profiles. Topics include CPS specification, requirements engineering and analysis for CPS, CPS architectures, design, simulation, integration and synthesis techniques, as well as controller synthesis. The course also explores existing platforms for CPS modeling and design. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6311.

Description: The course covers software testing process and software testing methods and techniques. Topics include overview of software process, software verification and software validation, inspection and reviews, pair programming, software version control, validating testing vs defect testing, test driven development, development testing (including unit testing, component testing, integration testing), regression testing, release testing, user testing, acceptance testing, performance testing, software metrics for testing purpose, configuration management and an introduction to formal methods. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course COEN 448.
  • Students who have taken SOEN 7481 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6851.

Description: This course covers the paradigm change from the Internet and devices to Internet of Things ( IoT) and IoT business models and applications, including health monitoring and smart cities. It also covers the IoT characteristics, constraints and requirements, protocols stack and contrast with the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) protocol stack. Other topics include physical, link and networking layer protocols. Moreover, it covers the message queueing telemetry transport (MQTT) and constrained application (CoAP) application layer protocols, and efficient XML interchange (EXI). The course provides an introduction to security threats and privacy in IoT systems, IoT analytics, platforms and tools. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course ELEC 446.
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under COEN 691 (Internet of Things) may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6851.

Description: The course starts with the review of the concepts of layered architectures, Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) and Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) stacks. Topics covered include cross-layered protocol architectures, advanced transport layer protocols (e.g. Quick UDP Internet Connections (QUIC), Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP), Datagram Congestion Control Protocol (DCCP), Domain Name Server (DNS) architecture, peer-to-peer communications and architectures, Electronic Mail protocols (i.e. Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP), Post Office Protocol (POP), Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP), World Wide Web (WWW) architecture, programming, and technologies (e.g. browser, Web server, Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), static/dynamic pages, Java servlet, Representational State Transfer (REST), the Web of Things (e.g. Constrained Application Protocol (CoAP)), and content delivery over the Web (e.g. Content Delivery Network (CDN) architecture, Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) framework). A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under ELEC 6861 may not take this course for credit.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students may re-register for this course, providing that the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated b changes to the course title in the graduate class schedule.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6741.

Description: Multiprocessing, Parallel processing, Vector processing, MIMD, SIMD, ILP (Instruction Level Parallelism), Superscalar, VLIW, Multithreading, Systolic processors, etc. A project is required.

Notes:
  • Students may re-register for this course, providing that the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by changes to the course title in the graduate class schedule.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6131.

Description: This course deals with the fundamental principles of fault tolerance and resilience control for cyber-physical systems (CPS). This course covers model-based
techniques for fault diagnosis, fault detection and isolation, reliable system design, control over packet-dropping channel, information dissemination in distributed systems, networked control systems, multi-agent systems, vulnerability of large-scale systems, and various applications related to CPS. It deals with the underlying mathematical theory, analysis, and design of fault- and attack-tolerant systems. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6131 or equivalent.

Description: Introduction to large-scale systems and applications. Model-order reduction and minimal realization. Centralized and decentralized fixed modes (CDMs and DEMs). Characterization and computation of DEMs and approximate DEMs. Structured and unstructured DEMs. Quotient fixed modes and stabilizability of decentralized systems by means of linear time-varying control law. Effects of sampling on decentralized control systems. Centralized and decentralized robust servomechanism problem. Decentralized controller design using pole assignment technique and optimization method. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Challenges of IC techniques and of VLSI, BJT and MOS processes. Passive components; network models and simulations. Layout design rules and CAD packages. Switch, active resistor, current mirror and voltage references; differential amplifiers, comparators, operational amplifiers, transinductance amplifiers, voltage to current transducers. Noise considerations. Offset and precision techniques. Applications: RF amplifiers, filters, oscillators, current mode IC networks. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Introduction to real-time computer control systems; a review of discrete-time signals and systems, difference equations, z-transform; sampled data systems, sample and hold, discrete models; discrete equivalents of continuous-time systems; stability analysis; design specifications; design using root locus and frequency response methods; implementation issues including bumpless transfer, integral windup, sample rate selection, pre-filtering, quantization effects and computational delay; scheduling theory and priority assignment to control processes, timing of control loops, effects of missed deadlines; principles and characteristics of sensors and devices, embedded processors, processor/device interface. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Topics include overview of wireline communication links, mechanisms of signal degradation, modulation formats, TX/RX synchronization options, IC technology limitations, transmitter front-end circuits, receiver front-end circuits, decision circuits, clock and data recovery systems, phase-locked loops, jitter, continuous-time and discrete-time equalizers, system metrics. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course.
  • Students who have received credit for ELEC 691 (Mixed-Signal VLSI for Communication Systems) may not take this course for credit.

Description: Review of network analysis. Magnitude and frequency scaling. Magnitude and phase approximation in synthesis of filter functions. Second order active RC filters. Synthesis of all-pole LC ladder filters. Second order switched capacitor filters. Integrated circuit filters. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Introduction to discrete-event systems (DES). Modelling (languages, automata and Petri nets). Supervisory control (controllability, modular control and control under partial observation). Architecture (decentralized and hierarchical schemes). Petri nets (modelling and analysis). Timed models. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENCS 6161.

Description: Basic hypothesis testing, cost functions, Bayes and Neyman Pearson tests, the power of a test, sequential tests; estimation, Bayes estimates, maximum a posteriori estimates; the Cramer-Rao inequality, maximum likelihood estimates; composite hypothesis testing, application of estimation theory to phase locked loops, vector representation of signals in noise, application of the Kharhunen-Loeve expansion, complex analytic representation of signals; detection and estimation of signals in white and non-white noise, the matched filter, composite hypothesis testing, random amplitude and phase, multi-path channels, waveform estimation, Wiener filters, Kalman filters. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENCS 6161 or ELEC 6831.

Description: This course covers Information Theory and Error Control Coding. The content of the course related to information theory includes entropy, discrete memoryless channels, channel capacity and channel coding theorem. In the area of Error Control Coding the course covers an introduction to abstract algebra linear block codes including Hamming, Bose–Chaudhuri–Hocquenghem (BCH), and Reed-Solomon codes; convolutional codes; introduction to iterative based codes; turbo codes, low-density paritycheck (LDPC) codes; trade-offs between power, bandwidth, data rate and system reliability. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6831.

Description: Topics include wireless radio link analysis; receiver sensitivity and receiver noise sources; path loss, shadowing, and fading models; area coverage and range calculation; introduction to cellular systems: frequency reuse, trunking and grade of service, sectoring and cell splitting, coverage and capacity. Modulation techniques for mobile communications, spread-spectrum techniques; multiplexing and multiple access techniques; wireless standards from first generation to fourth generation; OFDM: an architecture for the fourth generation. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENCS 6161.

Description: Entropy of a source, rate distortion functions, source coding, analog to digital conversion, effects of sampling and quantization, vector quantization, discrete memoryless channels and their capacity, cost functions, channel coding theorem, channel capacity, fundamental concepts of information theory with applications to digital communications, theory of data compression, broadcast channels, application to encryption, DES, public key encryption, computational complexity. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENCS 6161.

Description: Application of queuing theory to the analysis of the performance of telecommunication systems; Poisson arrival process and its properties; Birth-death processes applied to queuing, service distributions; performance measures of a queuing systems; examples of queuing systems in equilibrium; finite and infinite server and population models; Erlang blocking formulae; method of stages.; Networks of queues; product-form solution for open and closed queuing networks; computational algorithms for queuing networks; the imbedded Markov chain technique applied to queues with general service distribution, analysis of multiple access techniques, TDMA, FDMA, polling, CDMA, ALOHA and CSMA. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6851.

Description: Review of Internet architecture and protocols. Network impairments: jitter and delay. RTP: transport protocols for real-time data. Packet scheduling, QoS in the Internet: differentiated services, integrated services, Resource reservation protocol (RSVP), Multi protocol label switching (MPLS). Voice/Fax/Video over IP. Internet-to-PSTN. Protocols and standards - H.323, Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) and Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP). Internet telephony signaling. Interoperability issues. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6851.

Description: This course covers wireless sensor and actuator networks (WSAN) platforms in different domains including underwater, ground, and aerial networks. It covers sensors, actuators, and other hardware components in WSANs. Other topics include graph theory, connectivity and coverage, time synchronization and localization, power management, WSAN protocols, and quality of service (QoS). The course provides overview of tools
relevant to WSANs. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Junction theory (PN junctions, Schottky and ohmic contacts, heterojunctions). Structures and characteristics of diodes, solar cells, bipolar transistors, and fundamentals of MOSFETs. Planar silicon junctions and transistors will be designed, fabricated and evaluated in the laboratory, including resistivity measurements, semiconductor cleaning, oxidation, diffusion, photolithography, etching, metallization, and the comparison of design with experimental results. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course.
  • This course is cross-listed. Students who have taken the undergraduate equivalent version may not take this course for credit.

Description: The structure, characteristics, and design of MOS capacitors and MOSFETs, FinFETs, SOI FETs, velocity-modulation transistors, and HFETs. Role of strain in operation of modern FETs. Planar MOS devices, including capacitors and MOSFETs will be designed, fabricated and evaluated in the laboratory. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course. Students who have taken the undergraduate equivalent version may not take this course for credit.

Description: Introduction to basic VLSI technologies; crystal growth, thermal oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, chemical vapour deposition, wet and dry etching, and lithography. Layout, yield, and VLSI process integration. The lab demonstrates a semiconductor device fabrication process. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course. Students who have taken the undergraduate equivalent version may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6231 or ELEC 6241.

Description: Overview of micromachining process. Bulk-micromachined structures and devices. Anisotropic etching of silicon; phenomena, processes, geometry, crystal physics. Surface-micromachined structures, devices, processes. CMOS-compatible micromachining. Case-study examples. A project is required.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6221 or equivalent.

Description: Overview of optical properties of semiconductors. The fundamental principles for understanding and applying optical fiber technology, fundamental behaviour of the individual optical components and their interactions with other devices. Lasers, LED’s, optical fibers, light detectors, optical switches. Concepts and components of WDM and DWDM. A comprehensive treatment of the underlying physics such as noise and distortion in optical communications, light polarization, modulation and attenuation. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course covers the fundamental principles of nanoscience and nanotechnology which include principles of quantum mechanics and quantum properties of solid state materials. Properties of metal and semiconducting nanoparticles and their synthesis; Carbon nanostructures and nanotubes; bulk nanostructured materials; Solid disordered nanostructures and nanostructured crystals; quantum wells, quantum wires, and quantum dots and their physical properties; preparation of quantum nanostructures, Introduction to NanoElectroMechanical Systems (NEMS), nanomachining and fabrication of nanodevices. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6271 or equivalent.

Description: Theoretical basis of nanodevices. Overview of fundamental quantum phenomena in semiconductors. Electronics in low-dimensional structures (two-dimensional electron gas, quantum wire and dots, electron scattering, transport). High-speed electron devices based on quantum structures (nanoscale MOSFETs, high-electron-mobility transistors, resonant-tunneling diodes and transistors, superlattice-based transistors). Logic gates based on quantum devices. Quantum optoelectronics (optical transitions in quantum structures, quantum well, quantum dots photodetectors and lasers, quantum cascade lasers). Single electron devices. Carbon nanotube transistors, molecular electronics and spintronics. Nanodevice technology and characterization. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ELEC 691 (Principles of Solid State Nanodevices) may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course covers ionizing radiation and its sources; interactions of ionizing radiation with matter; principles and types of radiation detectors; semiconductor radiation detectors; X-ray imaging modalities and Flat-panel image sensors; photoconductor requirements; image quality metrics and cascaded system model; noise in imaging sensors and detective quantum efficiency; imaging detectors for nuclear medicine. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under ELEC 691 (Radiation Detectors for Medical Imaging) may not take this course for credit.

Description: Maxwell's equations and boundary conditions. Theorems: uniqueness, reciprocity, surface and volume equivalence. Vector potentials and solution of the homogeneous and inhomogeneous wave equations. Waveguides and scattering formulations in rectangular and cylindrical coordinates. Dielectric waveguides. Physical optics. Selected topics in integral and differential equations, ray-optical techniques, and computational methods. Applications to antennas and microwaves. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Description: Construction of Green’s functions. Canonical problems – waveguide, cylinder, wedge, dielectric slab. Sommerfeld integrals. Impedance boundary conditions. Surface and leaky waves. Asymptotics, method of steepest descent, method of stationary phase. High-frequency uniform asymptotic methods. Geometrical theory of diffraction. Edge diffraction, creeping waves. Applications to problems in antennas, computational electromagnetics, electromagnetic compatibility, propagation, and scattering. A project is required.

Component(s): Reading

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6341.

Description: Helmholtz equation, Green’s function, current element, the ideal dipole, radiation impedance, gain directivity, reciprocity, polarization. Half-wave dipole, antennas above ground, small loop antenna, arrays of antenna, array factor, pattern multiplication array synthesis, mutual impedance, aperture antenna. Hallens integral equation, Pocklingons equation, numerical solution by the method of weighted residuals, and by the moment method, wire grids. Magnetic field integral equation and solid surfaces. Aperture antennas, aperture integration, geometrical optics, physical optics. Geometrical theory of diffraction, wedge diffraction coefficients, applications, multiple diffraction and diffraction by curved surfaces. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ELEC 7341 may not take this course for credit.

  • This is a cross-listed course. Students who have taken the undergraduate equivalent version may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6341.

Description: Helmholtz equation, Green’s function, current element, the ideal dipole, radiation impedance, gain directivity, reciprocity, polarization. Half-wave dipole, antennas above ground, small loop antenna, arrays of antenna, array factor, pattern multiplication array synthesis, mutual impedance, aperture antenna. Hallens integral equation, Pocklingons equation, numerical solution by the method of weighted residuals, and by the moment method, wire grids. Magnetic field integral equation and solid surfaces. Aperture antennas, aperture integration, geometrical optics, physical optics. Geometrical theory of diffraction, wedge diffraction coefficients, applications, multiple diffraction and diffraction by curved surfaces. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ELEC 7341 may not take this course for credit.


Description: Sound generation and propagation in elastic media; conversion between acoustical, electric and mechanical energy. Lumped-parameter approximations, sound in rooms, underwater acoustics, microphones; loudspeakers and audio communications problems; noise and vibration control problems. A project is required.

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course. Students who have taken the undergraduate equivalent version may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6391.

Description: Introduction to wireless systems. Noise and distortion in microwave systems. Antennas and propagation. Amplifiers. Mixers. Transistor oscillators and frequency synthesizers. Modulation techniques. Receiver design. Use of RF CAD tools. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Introduction to EMC procedures, control plans and specifications. Radiated and conducted susceptibility and emission testing. Introduction EMC antennas, antenna concepts, electric and magnetic dipoles, biconical dipoles, conical log spiral antennas, setting up fields for susceptibility testing, measuring radiation from equipment. Coupled transmission lines, pulse propagation, closely spaced parallel transmission lines, capacitive coupling, inductive coupling, shielding against magnetic fields. Shielding and enclosures, electric and magnetic field screening mechanisms, shielding effectiveness, grounding considerations. EMC test facilities, screened rooms, TEM cells. Signals and spectra, intermodulation, cross-modulation, the spectrum analyzer. Noise and pseudo-random noise, noise performance of measurement/receiving systems, noise equiv Lecture. alent bandwidth, noise figure, antenna noise temperature and S/N ratio. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

This course is cross-listed course with ELEC 453.

Description: Properties of waveguides, striplines and microstrips. Scattering parameters. Butterworth and Chebyshev impedance transformers. Microwave couplers, cavities, and Fabry-Perot resonators. Periodic structures. Microwave filter design. Faraday rotation and non-reciprocal devices. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed course with undergraduate course ELEC 453. Students who have received credit for ELEC 453 may not enrol in this course.

This course is cross-listed course with ELEC 433.

Description: Introduction to power electronic systems. Semiconductor switches. Basic power converter configurations. Line commutated controlled and uncontrolled ac-dc rectifiers. Basic dc-dc converters. Pulse width modulation techniques. Basic dc-ac converters. Switching power supplies. Applications to industrial power supplies and motor drives. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed course with ELEC 433. Students who have received credit for ELEC 433 may not enrol in this course.

  • Students who have received credit for ELEC 433 may not enrol in this course.

This course is cross-listed course with ELEC 438.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6411.

Description: This course covers electrical basics and models of solar energy (photo-voltaics); electrical power from wind energy (including turbine operation); electrical power from wave and tidal energy; electrical power from micro-hydro and biomass waste to energy. Fundamental energy equations will be derived from physics and the electrical power equations developed. Engineering design implications will be discussed. Design assignments are given to reinforce the engineering design based on fundamental physics. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture; Tutorial

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed course with ELEC 438. Students who have received credit for ELEC 438 may not enrol in this course.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6471 or ELEC 6491.

Description: Transient modelling of electrical machines. ABC, Park’s transform and d,q, two axis modelling of synchronous and induction machines. Application of the advanced models to machine transients, for example, direct on line starting or reclosing operation. Vector control of AC machines including permanent magnet machines. Differences between permanent magnet AC and brushless DC machines. Switched reluctance motor modelling and operation. Modelling of losses in machines. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under ELEC 691 (Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives) may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6411.

Description: Circuits and operating principles of self commutated dc-dc and dc-ac converters. One and four quadrant dc-dc converters. Single-phase and three-phase voltage source and current source inverters. Pulse width modulation strategies. Resonant converters. Soft switching techniques. Isolated dc-dc converters. Application to switch-mode power supplies, uninterruptible power supplies and ac motor drives. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6411.

Description: Introduction to Electric Vehicles (EV), Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV). Vehicle design fundamentals. Traction motors for EV/HEV propulsion. On-board energy sources and storage devices: high-voltage traction batteries, fuel cells, ultra-capacitors, flywheels. Power electronic converters and control. Various EV/HEV/Fuel Cell Vehicle topologies and modelling. Energy management strategies. Practical design considerations. Engineering impact of electric, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed course with undergraduate course ELEC 439. Students who have received credit for ELEC 439 may not enrol in this course.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6411.

Description: This course uses machine design software to aid in the analysis and design of electrical machines, which is offered in a computer aided design (CAD) environment. The emphasis is on the design of electrical machines for renewable energy and electric vehicle applications. Emphasis is placed on permanent-magnet and switched reluctance machines, although machines of importance, like the induction machine, are also discussed. Magnetic equivalent circuits for a magnet and a typical machine radial field geometry are developed which lead naturally to sizing equations. Other geometries and Eddy current and hysteresis core loss models are presented. The torque angle curves of the switched reluctance machine are developed, which lead to design concepts. The synchronous reluctance machine is introduced. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6411.

Description: Elements of a drive system; characteristics of common mechanical systems; drive characteristics; operation in one, two or four quadrants. Fully controlled rectifier drives; braking of DC motors; control of DC motors using DC/DC converters. Control of polyphase induction motors; voltage-source and current source inverter drives; frequency-controlled induction motor drives; introduction to vector control of induction motor drives; field oriented control (FOC); sensor-less operation. Control of synchronous motors; permanent magnet motors. Switched reluctance motor (SRM) drives; stepper motors. Brush-less DC (BLDC) motor drives; low-power electronic motor drives. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Discrete-time signals and systems, difference equation; the discrete Fourier series and transform; the Z-transform and LTI systems; sampling of continuous-time signals. Reconstruction of signals using interpolation, sampling of discrete-time signals, discrete-time decimation and interpolation, changing the sampling rate by integer and non-integer factor; multirate signal processing, polyphase decomposition, multirate filter banks; digital processing of analog signals, A/D and D/A converters; linear phase and non-linear phase systems, all-pass and minimum phase systems; recursive and non-recursive digital filters, common digital filter structures, common design approaches for digital filters; random signals; linear adaptive filters, Weiner and Least-Mean-Square filters. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6601.

Description: Approximation and design of recursive and non-recursive digital filters. Transformations. Stability. Digital filter structures including wave and lattice structures. Effect of quantization, noise and limit cycles. Hardware implementation. Digital filter applications. A project is required.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: ELEC 6601; ENCS 6161.

Description: Numerical representation of waveform information; common waveform communication systems; statistical models used for waveforms; visual psychophysics. Differential PCM, motion estimation/compensation for video compressions. Transform coding: run length coding, Huffman and arithmetic coding, control of Q factor and Q table, segmentation/contour/edge based coding; pre-processing and post-processing strategies. Vector quantization. Sub-band coding and Wavelet Transform. Zero trees. Channel concerns: robustness, error recovery, masking video/image bit rate source models. Coding of two-level graphics. Review of standards: JPEG, MPEG, H.261. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6601.

Description: Topics include frequency analysis video signals, colour video models; TV and video capture and display, spatial-temporal basic operations, elementary visual features; vector matrix video notation; frequency response of human vision; theory of video sampling, video quality assessment; motion modelling and estimation; temporal frame prediction, video filtering, high-dynamic-range video; fundamentals of video compression, transform coding, predictive coding, recent video compression standards, digital TV, advanced topics. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6601.

Description: Two-dimensional signals and systems: linear system fundamentals, Fourier analysis of two-dimensional signals, discrete Fourier transform, two-dimensional FIR and IIR filter design and implementations. Image enhancement and restoration: smoothing and sharpening, noise reduction, order statistics filtering, inverse filtering, Wiener filtering, constrained least-square filtering. Wavelets and filter banks: multiresolution concept, perfect reconstruction, one- and two-dimensional wavelet transforms. Introduction to image compression: lossy and lossless compression, image compression standards. Introduction to image segmentation and edge detection. Color image processing: color image representation, color space conversion, pseudo and full color image processing. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have taken ELEC 7631 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: ELEC 6601; ENCS 6161.

Description: Optimal filtering; adaptive filter structures; linear prediction; lattice structures; Levinson recursion. The LMS-based algorithms; basic LMS and properties; mean-square error surface; stability and convergence behavior; normalized LMS; affine projection. Recursive least-square methods; method of least-squares; block least-squares methods. Frequency-domain and sub-band adaptive filters. Kalman filtering. Applications of adaptive filters. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have taken ELEC 7601 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Topics include principles and techniques used in the processing and analysis of medical images; image quality metrics, denoising medical images, quantification, rigid and deformable registration; similarity metrics such as mutual information (MI); images from the most common medical imaging modalities (X-ray, CT, MRI and ultrasound) will be used. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have taken ELEC 691 (Medical Image Processing) may not take this course for credit.

  • This course is cross-listed course with ELEC 444. Students who have received credit for ELEC 444 may not enrol in this course.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6601.

Description: This course covers signal processing through discussion of current bioengineering activities which rely on signal processing and include assessment of neural function with simultaneous collection of electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional MRI data; the noninvasive assessment of cardiac autonomic regulation using electrocardiography; assessment of neural function using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS); assessment of muscle activity using electromyography (EMG). Topics include modern spectral analysis, time-frequency analysis (short-time Fourier transforms and wavelets); signal modelling; multivariate analyses and adaptive filtering. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ELEC 691 (Biological Signal Processing) may not take this course for credit.

  • This is a cross-listed course with the undergraduate course ELEC 445. Students who have received credit for ELEC 445 (Biological Signal Processing) may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6851

Description: This course covers fundamental topics in network security and management, such as basic cryptography, authentication, message integrity, firewalls, security protocols, virtual private networks (VPNs), Management Information Bases (MIBs), and Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). It will also address emerging trends such as decentralized ledger techniques (blockchain and IOTA), and federated network management. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course ELEC 465.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6601.

Description: Topics include random processes and linear systems; baseband modulation/demodulation, optimal receivers in AWGN, correlation and matched-filter receivers, pulse shaping for band-limited channels; bandpass modulation techniques such as PAM, PSK, DPSK, FSK, QAM; synchronization, timing and carrier recovery, maximum-likelihood carrier phase and symbol timing estimation; error control coding, linear block codes, syndrome-based decoding, system bit error rate and coding gain. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: ELEC 6831; ENCS 6161.

Description: Digital signaling over band-limited channels: signal design for band-limited channels, maximum likelihood sequence detection, equalization techniques, e.g., zero-forcing, minimum mean squared error, adaptive equalization. Advanced coding and modulation: concatenated coding with iterative decoding, coded modulation techniques. Diversity techniques for fading channels. Synchronization techniques: carrier and timing recovery, frequency estimation techniques, frame and network synchronization, maximum-likelihood estimation and Cramer-Rao bounds. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Communication Networks and Services; Introduction to Layered Network Architectures; Transmission systems and the Telephone Network: multiplexing circuit switching, routing and signaling; Peer-to-Peer Protocols: ARQ protocols, data link controls, packet multiplexing, Multiple Access Communications: Aloha, CSMA, reservation schemes, polling, token-passing ring, LAN standards, LAN Bridges; Packet-switching Networks: Datagrams and virtual circuits; TCP/IP Architecture: Internet protocol, transmission control protocol. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Overview of the basics of optical transmitters, optical receivers, optical fibers, optical amplifiers, and SDH/SONET. Design of optical fiber amplifiers: fiber Raman amplifiers and Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA), theories, configurations, simulation, designs, applications, requirements for optical networks. Optical transmitters: characteristics and requirements for optical networks. Optical receivers: characteristics, requirements, noise analysis. Optical systems and performance: system architectures, design guidelines, long-haul systems, dispersion management. Coherent optical systems: ASK, FSK, DPSK, system performance. DWDM systems and networks: WAN and MAN system performance, TDM, subcarrier multiplexing, CDMA, WDM network design, network survivability. Optical solition systems: fiber solitions, loss-managed solitions, dispersion-managed solitions, impact of amplifier noise, high-speed solition system. Photonic packet switching: OTDM synchronization, header processing, burst switching. Access optical networks: architectures, PON. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6141 or ELEC 6841.

Description: Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) communication systems and wireless channel models; Diversity techniques and array processing; MIMO channel capacity; Space-time black and trellis codes; Spatial multiplexing and layered space-time architectures, diversity-versus-multiplexing tradeoff; Differential and unitary space-time coding; MIMO OFDM and space-frequency coding; Concatenated coding and iterative decoding for MIMO systems; Applications of MIMO in wireless systems. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

This is a cross-listed course.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6831.

Description: This course covers signal definition, human eye limitations, pixel representation schemes, serial digital interface (SDI); image formats (1080i, 720i, 4k, 8k); compression schemes: H.264/265; modulation and coding techniques used in broadcasting. This course also covers terrestrial transmission standards such as DVB-T2, ATSC-3; satellite broadcasting standards such as DVB/S2; MPEG transport stream (MPEG-TS), program specific information (PSI), program ID (PID), program association tables (PAT), program map table (PMT), conditional access, program clock reference (PCR); multiplexing and IP encapsulation, single program transport stream (SPTS) and multiple program transport stream (MPTS); video storage and retrieval. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course.

  • Students who have received credit for ELEC 691 (Transmission in Broadcast Signal) may not take this course for credit.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Notes:
  • Students may re-register for this course, providing that the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by changes to the course title in the graduate class schedule.

Description: Students identify a technical topic in the field of Electrical and Computer Engineering and after getting approval from the instructor of the course, prepare a presentation about the topic. The topic is based on one or a small number of articles in reputed journals in the field. Students present their technical topic in the class and answer oral questions from other students and the instructor. Students are expected to attend a significant number of presentations by other students and get involved by asking questions.

Component(s): Seminar

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENCS 6171.

Description: Characterization of traffic sources, data, voice and video; ATM protocol architecture, ATM switching architectures, performance evaluation of the ATM multiplexer; Call admission control in ATM networks; Traffic management in ATM, TCP/IP over ATM and wireless ATM Fluid flow approximation, z-transform techniques, and blocking for multiclass flows. A project is required.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENCS 6461.

Description: Design driving factors. Characteristics of basic converter topologies, including resonant and soft switching circuits. Characteristics and limitations of power semiconductors as switching devices. Design considerations for gate drives, snubbers, power filters and protection circuits. Printed circuit board and thermal design. Application to the practical design of typical power converter systems. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ELEC 6411.

Description: Steady state and dynamic characteristics of transmission systems. Theory of line compensation and reactive power control; series and shunt passive compensation. Principles of operation of static compensators and basic configurations; series, shunt and shunt-series. Flexible ac transmission systems (FACTS). Line and self commutated controllers; configurations and control aspects. Applications to distribution systems. Performance evaluation and practical applications of static compensators. A project is required.

Notes:
  • Students may re-register for this course, providing that the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated b changes to the course title in the graduate class schedule.

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