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Engineering and Computer Science Courses

Description: Fundamentals of English composition and argumentation: grammar, reasoning and persuasion; persuasive proofs; argumentation; structuring and outlining: the problem statement; the body; and the conclusions. Language and persuasion for effective communication in professional engineering. Cultivation of a writing style firmly based on clear and critical thinking skills. Lectures: three hours per week.

Component(s): Lecture three hours per week

Notes:
  • This course cannot be taken within the credit requirements of the program.

Notes:
  • Students may re-register for this course, providing that the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by changes to the course title in the graduate class schedule.

Description: Functions of one variable, Taylor’s series expansion, review of differentiation, integration and solution of ordinary differential equations. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, introduction to partial differential equations, wave equation and diffusion equation. Matrix and vector analysis, characteristic value problems, orthogonal functions; introduction to statistics and numerical methods. Lectures: three hours per week.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Sturm-Liouville problem; orthogonal functions; ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients and power series solutions; integral transforms; partial differential equations; boundary value problems; applications to engineering problems. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Topics include historical emergence of engineering throughout the world; cross-cultural dimensions of contemporary engineering practice; qualitative research methods for cultural analysis; technical communication across cultures. Case studies and a project are required.

Description: Explanations of innovative and creativity thinking; approaches to problem solving, psychology of invention; diffusion of innovation; leadership through critical thinking; design creativity; modern and historical examples of innovation; and cognitive approaches to scientific and technological thinking. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course introduces theories of client-centred design. Topics and skills covered include qualitative data collection, customer development communication, and user interview techniques. Students will have hands-on experience in customer validation, audience appropriate message creation, and advanced presentation techniques for the innovation process. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously or concurrently: ENCS 6041 and ENCS 6042.

Description: Registration is restricted to students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Innovation, Technology and Society. The seminar integrates theoretical concepts in innovation and communication processes in preparation for projects in the certificate practicum.

Component(s): Seminar; Reading

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: ENCS 6041, ENCS 6042 and ENCS 6043. Registration is restricted to students enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Innovation, Technology and Society.

Description: The practicum takes place in the Concordia District 3 Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. Students develop innovation projects under the supervision of academic advisors and District 3 instructional personnel.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Description: Numerical solution of partial differential equations; weighted residuals techniques with emphasis on finite differences and finite elements; convergence, stability and consistency analysis; solution of integral equations; boundary value problems; discrete Fourier series and fast Fourier transform. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENCS 6011 or equivalent.

Description: Elements of probability theory, decision models, expected costs and benefits, models from random occurrences, extreme value statistics, Monte Carlo simulation, reliability analysis, general applications to engineering design problems. A project is required.

Description: Axioms and rules of probabilities, Bayes’ Theorem, binary communication systems, Bernoulli trials and Poisson Theorem, random variables, distributions and density functions, moments, correlation, Chebyshev and Markov’s inequalities, characteristic functions, Chernoff inequality, transformation of random variable, random processes, stationarity, Bernoulli, Random Walk, Poisson, shot noise, random telegraph, and Wiener processes, stopping time; Wald’s equation, elements of Renewal Theory, Mean-Ergodic Theorem, auto and cross-correlation functions, correlation time, auto-correlation receiver, Wiener-Khinchin Theorem, power spectral density, linear system with stochastic inputs, matched filtering. Project: two hours per week.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ELEC 6161 may not take this course for credit.

Description: The optimization problem; classical optimization; one dimensional search techniques; unconstrained gradient techniques; quadratically convergent minimization algorithms; constrained optimization; constrained gradient techniques; penalty-function methods; applications. Project: two hours per week.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course ELEC 482. Students who have completed ELEC 482 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Fuzzy sets, operations on fuzzy sets, fuzzy relations; fuzzy logic: connectives, implication functions, representation of fuzzy rules and fuzzy logic based reasoning; fuzzy logic in planning and control: Zadeh’s Generalized Modus Ponens type reasoning, Mamdani type reasoning, fuzzy clustering based system identification and Sugeno type reasoning; case studies. Projects on selected applications.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course provides graduate students with the research writing and presentation skills that are essential in academic and professional contexts. Students develop expertise and confidence in research methods, critical reading, crafting thesis statements, leading and participating in discussions, revision/editing and peer review, maintaining research dossiers and report writing.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course cannot be taken within the credit requirements of any graduate Engineering and Computer Science program, with the exception of the Diploma in Computer Science, the Master of Engineering and the Master of Applied Computer Science.

  • Students who have taken ENCS 591 (Technical Writing and Research Methods) may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course introduces advanced concepts and protocols of modern telecommunication networks based on Photonic technology. The basics of optical communications networks will be introduced, including the enabling technology, and the main emphasis will be on network architectures and associated protocols. This includes: orientation of transport networks and their evolution (Ring and Mesh topologies); Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM); wavelength-routed networks; wavelength conversion; lightpath routing protocols (static, dynamic, adaptive routing and traffic grooming) and optimization problems; control and management protocols and distributed provisioning; survivable network design (proactive and reactive); fault-management and various network restoration protocols; convergence of optical networks and the Internet (IP/WDM) and Generalized Multi Protocol Label Switching (G-MPLS). There will be various assignments in which students will be involved in research projects. Knowledge of telecommunication systems and a background in network simulation is needed. Project.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Description: This is an introductory course in international development and global engineering for graduate students. Topics may include evolution of development, globalization, development projects, planning and analysis, and participatory data gathering. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Subject matter will vary from term to term and from year to year.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Notes:
  • Students may re-register for this course, providing that the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by changes to the course title in the graduate class schedule.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed at least twenty credits in the program prior to enrolling and must have an internship placement offer. Permission of the Department Co-op Program Academic Director is required.

Description: This course must be completed under the supervision of an experienced engineer/computer scientist in the facilities of a participating company. Each student receives an assessment from the Departmental Co-op Program Academic Director in consultation with the industry supervisor and the faculty advisor.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. The student obtains 9 credits once all academic requirements are completed satisfactorily in compliance with the program requirements
  • A Canadian work permit is required

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENCS 8511 Doctoral Research Proposal.

Description:

The PhD Seminar is designed to train students to communicate the results of their research projects to the community and participate in research discussions. The student’s evaluation is based upon attendance in all seminars, a report on the student’s thesis research under the direction of the thesis supervisor(s), and a presentation.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • This course is assessed on pass/fail basis.
  • Students should enrol in this course once they have sufficiently progressed into their research, normally after 6 months (12 months for part-time students) of being admitted to candidacy, which is normally after 24 months (48 months for part-time students) of residency, and must be completed before the submission of the thesis.

Description: Students must take a comprehensive examination, which may be both written and oral. Students will be assessed on the basis of written and oral examinations of fundamentals related to their field of research. The comprehensive examination will normally be administered by a committee (the Comprehensive Examination Committee) consisting of the supervisory committee, at least one member external to the candidate’s program and other members appointed at the discretion of the supervisory committee. Students should consult the program regarding specific examination procedures and requirements.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Notes:
  • Normally the comprehensive examination is taken when course work has been completed and within 12 months (24 months for part-time) after the first registration as a full-time or part-time student in a PhD program. Students who fail this examination are permitted to take it a second time in the following term. Students failing a second time are withdrawn from the program.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Successful completion of ENCS 8501 Comprehensive Examination is required.

Description: The goal of the doctoral research proposal is to focus the student’s PhD research for the dissertation. The proposal includes an extensive critical review of previous research on the subject of the thesis, and a detailed research plan of action and expected milestones. Students defend their doctoral research proposal before a committee that will normally be comprised of the same members as the comprehensive examination committee.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Notes:
  • The proposal may be accepted, returned for modifications, or rejected. The rejection of a proposal will result in the student’s withdrawal from the program. Students must pass the doctoral research proposal within 24 months (48 months for part-time) after the first registration as a full-time or part-time student in a PhD program.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6131 or equivalent.

Description: Review of linear control design techniques for nonlinear systems and their limitations; introduction to Lyapunov stability, Lyapunov functions and LaSalle’s invariance principle; introduction to switched and hybrid systems using piecewise-affine systems as a motivating example; modelling and simulation of switched and hybrid systems; switching policies, hybrid automata and executions; Lyapunov stability analysis of switched and hybrid systems; stability as a convex optimization problem; Lyapunov-based control of switched and hybrid systems; controller design as a non-convex problem; stability analyses and the controller design problems; dynamic programming and optimal control techniques; extensive examples from simplified models of industrial problems in the aeronautical, automotive and process industries. The course includes a computer aided controller design project.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: State-space representation of dynamic systems, canonical realizations, solutions, modal decomposition, stability. Controllability and observability, minimal realizations, state feedback, pole placement, observers, observer-based controllers. Introduction to optimal control, linear quadratic regulator, the Kalman filter. Limitation on performance of control systems, introduction to robustness. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course.

Description: State-space representation of dynamic systems, canonical realizations, solutions, modal decomposition, stability. Controllability and observability, minimal realizations, state feedback, pole placement, observers, observer-based controllers. Introduction to optimal control, linear quadratic regulator, the Kalman filter. Limitation on performance of control systems, introduction to robustness. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed course with the undergraduate course ELEC 481. Students who have received credit for ELEC 481 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6131.

Description: Dynamic systems: definitions and notations; nonlinear differential equations; Lipschitz continuity; linearization; describing functions; phase plane analysis; Lyapunov stability; Popov and circle criteria; limit cycles. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course presents the macroscopic mechanical behaviour of continuously distributed solid and fluid materials. This is a fundamental graduate course in the field of mechanical or aerospace engineering, which covers basic principles of continuum mechanics and their engineering applications. All laws of continuum mechanics are formulated in terms of quantities that are independent of coordinates. Thus, in this course, first the concept of tensors is presented in detail as the linear transformation. This is followed by the formulation of the kinematics of very small and large deformation and the description of stresses and the basic laws of continuum mechanics common to all materials. Finally, constitutive equations governing the behaviours of idealized materials, including the elastic, hyperelastic and viscous materials, are presented as applications of these laws. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Elements of smart sensors and systems and their structures; properties of various smart materials including piezoelectric, pyroelectric, shape memory alloys, Rheological fluids, piezoresistive and magnetostrictive; physical and mathematical basis of smart materials; characterization of smart multi-functional materials; sensors and actuators in mechatronics; design and fabrication of sensors and actuators by micromachining; survey of classical system theory; design of sensors and actuators for applications in industrial and medical robotics, haptics, and other systems such as aerospace and smart structures. The students are required to undertake a project work involving design of smart sensors/actuators for specific applications.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: The origin and characteristics of biological potentials: nerve, muscle, heart, brain; the measurement of biological events; instrumentation systems: electrical safety, biomechanics, biomaterials, orthopaedic engineering; biomedical engineering applications/implications in industry. Project on a current topic.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Fundamental concepts of fluid mechanics; transport phenomena; stress-strain relation; equations of motion; exact solutions; dynamic similarity; specialized equations; laminar boundary layers; flow over immersed bodies; introduction to turbulent flow. Projects on selected topics.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6201 or equivalent.

Description: Introduction to microfluidics: continuum fluid mechanics, non-continuum regimes, molecular approach. Review of classical fluid mechanics: gas flows, liquid flows, two-phase flows. Microfluidic effects: low Reynolds number flows and chaotic mixing, electrokinetics, surface tension effects and electrowetting. Electrostatic/electromagnetic/piezoelectric actuation of microfluidic systems. Methods in microfluidics: computation, experimentation. Microfluidic components: microchannels, micromixers, micropumps, microvalves, microsesors. Overview of microfluidic applications: lab-on-chip devices, microstructured fuel cells. A project is required.

Component(s): Reading

Description: Topics include introduction to microfluidic components (pumps, valves, automation), programming microfluidics, fabrication techniques, microfluidic paradigms, and applications for chemical and biological analysis; introduction to synthetic biology, biological parts and their properties, network structure and pathway engineering, synthetic networks, manipulating DNA and measuring responses, basic behaviour of genetic circuits, building complex genetic networks; integration of mircofluidics and synthetic biology; economic implications. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGR 691 (Microfluidic Devices for Synthetic Biology) may not take this course for credit.
  • This course is cross-listed with the undergraduate course COEN 434. Students who have received credit for COEN 434 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6201.

Description: Fundamental concepts of ideal flow; irrotational flow patterns; kinematics of flow; potential theory; standard flow patterns; conformal transformation; Cauchy-Riemann condition; complex operator; simple engineering applications. A project is required.

Component(s): Reading

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6201.

Description: Classification of second order partial differential equations, boundary conditions. Finite difference discretization of equations, truncation error, explicit and implicit formulations. Numerical stability, consistency and convergence. Time dependent (parabolic) equations, explicit and implicit discretization, stability, convergence. Steady state (elliptic) equations, explicit and implicit discretization, iterative and direct solution methods. Hyperbolic equations. Formulation of flow problems and applications to incompressible, compressible and transonic inviscid and viscous flows are interspersed throughout the course. Project on specific topic or applications.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6201.

Description: Classification of second order partial differential equations, boundary conditions. The finite element method, simple examples, assembly rules, solution of linear systems of equations. Forming the modules of a general FEM computer code. The variational approach, variational principles and stationary functions. Elements and interpolation functions. The weighted residual approach Rayleigh-Ritz, least squares, subdomain and collocation, weak Galerkin formulation. Formulation of flow problems and applications to incompressible, compressible and transonic inviscid and viscous flows are interspersed throughout the course. Project on specific topic or applications.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Description: Computational methods in fluid mechanics, the Reynolds-averaged equations, scales of turbulence, two-point correlation tensors, algebraic models, one equation and two equation models, Boussinesq approximation, nonlinear constitutive relations, types of turbulent flows, multiple time scales and stiff differential equations, solution convergence and grid sensitivity, brief introduction to advanced models. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGR 691 (Modelling Turbulent Flows) may not take this course for credit.

Description: Viscoelasticity, standard flows and material functions, relationships between material functions, generalized Newtonian fluid, the Maxwell model, finite linear viscoelasticity, continuum constitutive equations, effects of material, temperature and pressure on viscoelasticity behaviour, rheometry issues in viscoelastic flow simulations, industrial applications of rheology. A project is required.

Component(s): Reading

Notes:
  • Basic understanding of fluid mechanics is required.

Description: Dynamics of rigid bodies; generalized coordinates; D’Alembert’s principle; Lagrange’s equations; energy methods, Hamilton’s theory; Euler-Lagrange equations; variational principle of mechanics. Phase space canonical transformation. Language multipliers methods. Hamilton-Jacobe equation. Project on specific topic or applications.

Component(s): Lecture


Description: Vibrations of discrete systems: Single-Degree of Freedom (SDOF) and Multi-Degree of Freedom (MDOF) systems; continuous systems: bars, beams, membranes and plates with various boundary conditions; mode superposition; energy methods; Rayleigh-Ritz Method; condensation techniques; applications to machine components, rotor bearing systems, vehicle and aerospace structures. Project on selected topics is an integral part of the course.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course.

This is a cross-listed course with the undergraduate course MECH 424.

Description: Introduction to microsystems and devices; mechanical properties of materials used in microsystems; microfabrication and postprocessing techniques; sacrificial and structural layers; lithography, deposition and etching; introduction and design of different types of sensors and actuators; micromotors and other microdevices; mechanical design, finite element modelling; design and fabrication of free-standing structures; microbearings; special techniques: double sided lithography, electrochemical milling, laser machining, LIGA, influence of IC fabrication methods on mechanical properties; application examples in biomedical, industrial and space technology areas; integration, bonding and packaging of MEMS devices. This course includes a project.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed course with the undergraduate course MECH 424. Students who have completed MECH 424 may not take this course for credit.


Description: Types of industrial robots and their applications. Mathematical analysis for robot manipulation: homogeneous transformations; definition and solution of kinematic equations governing the position and orientation of the hand. Force analysis and static accuracy; forces and moments of inertia, dynamic equation of equilibrium, differential equations of motion of robotic arms. Robotic actuators. Project on specific topic or applications.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course.

Description: Topics include application of autonomous wheeled robots: autonomous cars, indoor robots, (off-road) unmanned ground vehicles; robot motion models, robot odometry; robot sensor models: beam models of range finders, feature-based measurement models; occupancy grid mapping; the Bayes Filter; the Kalman filter; the particle filter; robot localization: particle filter localization, Kalman filter localization; introduction to simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM). A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ELEC 691 (Autonomy for Mobile Robots) may not take this course for credit.

  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course ELEC 473. Students who have completed ELEC 473 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Overview of DoT and other international (FAA, etc.) aviation standards, regulations and certification procedures; regulatory areas, namely, pilot training/testing, air traffic procedures, aircraft systems design and airworthiness; development process for new regulations and criteria for certification. Projects on selected topics.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Fundamentals of materials engineering and processing with special emphasis on aerospace engineering materials and protection against failure; microstructures, phase equilibria for aerospace materials, dislocations, deformation, strain hardening and annealing, recovery, recrystallization; hot and cold metal forming (aircraft fabrication), solidification, castings (process and defects); welding and non-destructive testing, solid solution and dispersion strengthening; ferrous alloys and super alloys, light alloys (AL, MG, TI), ceramic materials, polymers, composite materials (polymer matrix/metal matrix); corrosion, fatigue and creep failure; fracture and wear. Projects on selected topics.

Component(s): Reading

Description: Introduction: history of air navigation; earth coordinate and mapping systems; international navigation standards; airspace and air traffic control structure; basics of flight instruments and flight controls; fundamental concepts of navigation. Classification of modern avionic navigation systems. Basics of air traffic communication: radio wave propagation; VHF and HF systems. Short range, long range, approach/terminal area avionic navigation systems and radar systems: principles; design; advantages/disadvantages; errors; impact of global positioning system and future trends. Introduction to advanced integrated avionic systems. Projects on selected topics.

Component(s): Lecture

This is a cross-listed course with undergraduate course AERO 483.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6461.

Description: Introduction to the basic principles of integration of avionics systems; review of Earth’s geometry and Newton’s laws; inertial navigation sensors and systems (INS); errors and uncertainty in navigation; global positioning system (GPS); differential and carrier tracking GPS applications; terrestrial radio navigation systems; Kalman filtering; integration of navigation systems using Kalman filtering; emphasis on integration of GPS and INS using Kalman filtering. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course AERO 483. Students who have received credit for AERO 483 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Plane stress and strain; analysis of stress and strain in three dimensions; Airy’s stress function; solution of two-dimensional problems by polynomials and Fourier series; effect of small holes in bars and plates; torsion and bending of prismatic bars; Membrane analogy; thermoelasticity; rectangular, circular, ring-shaped flat plates; applications in civil and mechanical engineering. A case study or a project is required.


Description: Topics include matrix formulation of the force and of the displacement methods of analysis; direct stiffness approach, finite element methods for structural analysis; truss, beam, plane strain, plane stress, shell and solid elements; computer applications. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course BCEE 452. Students who have completed BCEE 452 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6511.

Description: Displacement analysis of structures; finite elements of a continuum; applications of the method to stress analysis of two-and three-dimensional structures; stability problems; vibrations and heat transfer; digital computer applications. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6511.

Description: Dynamic behaviour of structures; lumping of masses; motion of elastic framed structures caused by arbitrary disturbances; analytical and numerical methods of solution; approximate determinations of natural frequencies in elastic systems; dynamic response of framed structures in the inelastic range; continuous systems, introduction to approximate design methods. A case study or a project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Analysis of elastic and inelastic stability of columns; frame buckling; beam-columns, strength of plates, shear webs and shells; torsiona; flexural buckling of thin-walled, open sections; snap-through; critical discussion of current design specifications; applications to structures. A case study or a project is required.

Description: Analysis of deformation and stress in plates and flat slabs under transverse loads; various boundary conditions; numerical methods; membrane stresses and displacements in shells under various loading; bending theory of shells; limit analysis of rotationally symmetric plates and shells; applications to shell type structures such as folded plate structures; sandwich plates; shell roofs and pressure vessels. A case study or a project is required.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6511.

Description: Principles of virtual work, total potential and complementary energy. Reisner’s Principle. Introduction to calculus of variations. Ritz and Galerkin’s methods. Applications to frame, plate and shell structures. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Theory of vibrations. Dynamic response of simple structural systems. Effects of blast, wind, traffic and machinery vibrations. Basic concepts in earthquake resistant design. Computer applications. A case study or a project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course BCEE 455. Students who have completed ELEC 455 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: BLDG 6541.

Description: Magnitude and availability of the solar energy input, including seasonal and diurnal variations of direct beam radiation; spectral distribution of sunlight; scattering and absorption processes; diffuse radiation; influence of cloud cover. Magnitude and time variation of typical loads, including space heating and cooling water heating; dehumidification. Principles of passive and active methods of solar collection, thermal conversion, and energy storage. Analysis of systems and components, including treatment of thermal and turbulent losses; efficiency calculations; electrical analogies; impedance matching and system optimization. Economics of systems. A case study or a project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6201.

Description: This course emphasizes the mechanical design of solar heating and cooling systems and consists of the following topics: thermodynamic analysis of radiation, collection and conversion of solar energy, selection and manufacturing of components such as collectors, piping, line insulation, heat exchangers, etc., solar cooling and dehumidification, control of solar energy systems, case studies and project experiences. A case study or a project is required.

Description: The place of organisms and materials in the solar energy cycle; physical, chemical and optical phenomena. Selective absorbers: surfaces and films, emissivity, thermal conversion, role of crystal defects and phase interfaces in metals and semiconductors. Reflector characteristics and damage modes. Optical and mechanical properties of glass, polymer and composite windows. Photovoltaic: physics and materials. Chemical, thermal and photo stability. Thermal transfer and storage media: gaseous, aqueous, organic; phase change and particulate systems; stability and corrosive effects. A case study or a project is required.

Description: Depletion of conventional energy sources. Emission of greenhouse gases from conventional power production systems. Principles of renewable energy systems; cogeneration of electrical and thermal energy, photovoltaic systems, wind power, fuel cells, hybrid systems. Hydrogen and other forms of energy storage for renewable power production. Integrated and small-scale renewable energy systems; independent versus grid-connected systems. A case study or a project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: See Note in Topic Area E02

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Students complete a case study and submit a report on a topic related to the students’ discipline, supervised by a professor, and approved by the Graduate Program Director in students' home department. The case study and report must present a current engineering problem or practice related to the students' research interest.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course cannot be taken by students enrolled in the SOEN program.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Permission of Instructor is required.

Description: Introduction to the science and technology of spaceflight; remote sensing; human factors in space; automation and robotics; space law; space transportation systems; the space station; the Moon-Mars initiative; space utilization; interplanetary travel. Project on selected topic.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Enrolment in an MEng program is required. Before registration for a project course, a student must obtain written consent of a faculty member who will act as advisor for the report. A form for this consent is available in the Office of the Dean of Engineering and Computer Science.

Description: The purpose of the project report is to provide students in the MEng program with an opportunity to carry out independent project work and to present it in an acceptable form. The project may consist of the following: 1. A theoretical study of an engineering problem. 2. A design and/or development project conducted at Concordia. 3. A design and/or project conducted as part of the student’s full-time employment, providing the student’s employer furnishes written approval for the pursuit and reporting of the project. 4. An ordered and critical exposition of the literature on an appropriate topic in engineering. A four-credit report is due on the last day of classes of the term (fall, winter, summer) in which it is registered. Students are expected to have a preliminary version of their report approved by their advisor before its final submission. On or before the submission deadline, students must submit three copies of the report to their advisors, who will grade the report. One copy of the report will be returned to the students, one retained by the advisors, and one by the department. The report, including an abstract, must be suitably documented and illustrated, should be at least 5000 words in length, must be typewritten on one side of 21.5 cm by 28 cm white paper of quality, and must be enclosed in binding. Students are referred to “Form and Style: Thesis, Report, Term Papers, fourth edition by Campbell and Ballou,” published by Houghton Migglin. Project: 8 hours per week.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Enrolment in the MEng Program is required. Permission of the Department; and approval by the faculty member who has accepted to supervise the work is required prior to enrolling.

Description: Students may register for this project course if they wish to carry out a more extended project, or if they wish to complete further projects. The report will be evaluated by the advisor and at least one other Engineering and Computer Science member of the Gina Cody School. Project: 8 hours per week.

Notes:
  • Students working on a multi-course project must register for the corresponding project courses in successive terms.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Enrolment in the MEng Program is required. Permission of the Department; and approval by the faculty member who has accepted to supervise the work is required.

Description: Students may register for this project course if they wish to carry out a more extended project, or if they wish to complete further projects. The project report is due on the last day of classes of the last term in which students are registered. Three copies of the report must be submitted to the advisor on or before this deadline, and students are also required to make an oral presentation to the evaluators, and other members of the community. The report will be evaluated by the advisor and at least one other Engineering and Computer Science member of the Gina Cody School. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students working on a multi-course project must register for the corresponding project courses in successive terms.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6131.

Description: Representation of linear multivariable systems. Controllability, observability and canonical forms; poles and zeroes; multivariable system inverses; the linear quadratic regulator problem; the robust servomechanism problem; the minimal design problem; frequency-domain design techniques. Project: 2 hours per week.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: ELEC 6061; ENGR 6131.

Description: Real-time parameter estimation; least-squares and regression models; recursive estimators; model reference adaptive systems (MRAS); MRAS based on gradient approach and stability theory; self-tuning regulators (STR); adaptive prediction and control; stability and convergence results, robustness issues; auto-tuning and gain scheduling; alternatives to adaptive control; practical aspects; implementation and applications. Project: 2 hours per week.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: ELEC 6061; ENGR 6131.

Description: Review of discrete-time and sampled-data systems; discrete input-output and state-space equivalents; controllability and observability of sampled-data systems; controller design using transform techniques, design using state-space methods; generalized sample-data hold functions; optimal control; quantization effects; multi-rate sampling; robust control; discrete-time non-linear systems; discrete-time multivariable systems. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGR 6181 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6201.

Description: Forces and accelerations in space environment; zero-gravity simulation, free falling capsules, flights in Keplerian trajectories, sounding rockets, and the space station; surface tension; main non-dimensional parameters; Laplace-Young equation; contact angle; Dupre’s equation; Neumann’s triangle; minimization principle associated with Laplace’s equation; equilibrium shapes of a liquid, small oscillations of ideal and viscous fluids, liquid handling problems at low gravity, liquid positioning and control, vortexing capillary; numerical simulations of liquid dynamics in microgravity environment. Projects on selected topics.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6311.

Description: Mathematical descriptions of stochastic processes; spectral density and correlation functions; Gaussian and non-Gaussian random processes; Markov processes and Fokker/Planck equation; response of linear and nonlinear oscillatory systems to random excitation; non-stationary and narrow-band random processes. Project on selected research topic or applications.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6411.

Description: Control of a single link manipulator; position, velocity and acceleration errors; control of a multiple link manipulator sensor: vision, proximity, touch, slip, force, compliance and force controlled robots. Computer control of robots, command languages. Introduction to intelligent robots. Project on selected topics of current interest.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6461.

Description: Definitions, purpose, history and evolution of avionic systems; cockpit displays configurations, classifications, and design considerations; ARINC communication bus system standards; air data computer system; navigation systems; automatic flight control systems; monitoring/warning/alert systems; flight management systems; system integration; advanced concepts and future trends. Projects on selected topics.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6511 or equivalent.

Description: Topics include finite elements of a continuum; applications of the method to stress analysis of two- and three-dimensional structures; stability problems; vibrations and heat transfer; non-linear methods; computer applications. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have taken ENGR 6531 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Subject matter will vary from term to term and from year to year.

Notes:
  • Students may re-register for this course, providing that the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by changes to the course title in the graduate class schedule.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must have completed at least twelve credits in the composite option and at least twenty-one credits in the aerospace program. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the program director is required.

Description: This is an integral component of the aerospace program and the composites option in the Mechanical Engineering program that is to be completed under the supervision of an experienced engineer in the facilities of a participating company (Canadian work permit is required). The topic is to be decided by a mutual agreement between the student, the participating company and the program director.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Notes:
  • The course is graded on the basis of the student’s performance during the work period, which includes a technical report. There may be some restrictions placed on students chosen for the industry sponsored “stage”. For those students who are unable to obtain an industrial stage, it is possible to take this course for a project carried out at the university. Such students must obtain the approval of the program director.

Description: The thesis represents the results of the student’s independent work after admission to the program. The student submits a thesis based upon this work and defends it in an oral examination. The thesis is evaluated by an Examining Committee which consists of the student’s supervisor(s), and two (2) examiners, one of whom may be external to the student’s department. The Committee must be approved by the Graduate Program Director of the student's department.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Description: Students are required to plan and carry out a suitable research, development, or design project, which leads to an advance in knowledge. The thesis involves a literature review of the field of research, and reports on the planning and execution of innovative and original research conducted under supervision of a faculty member. The thesis is the object of an oral defense, under the guidelines of the School of Graduate Studies. Theses will be examined by a committee consisting of the student’s supervisory committee, an external examiner, and other examiners as approved by the GCS Dean of Graduate Studies.

Component(s): Thesis Research

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