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Mechanical, Industrial and Aerospace Engineering Courses

Description: This course introduces the fundamentals of convex analysis such as polyhedral sets and the representation theorem. Advanced topics in linear optimization are also covered, such as state-of-the-art solution methods (revised and dual simplex methods, path following interior point methods), duality theory and parametric analysis, Farkas lemma, and KKT optimality conditions. An introduction to other advanced topics (Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition, dynamic programming, and stochastic decision processes) is given. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Topics include model building in optimization, model validation, economic interpretation, sensitivity analysis, algorithms and commercial optimization software for problem solving. Mathematical models in deterministic and nondeterministic settings with linear, integer, and nonlinear programming formulations are developed. Applications of optimization models in production, transportation, finance, scheduling, and healthcare systems are presented. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Basic concepts; trees, circuits and cutsets; Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs; directed graphs; matrices of a graph, graphs and vector spaces; planarity and duality; connectivity, matching and colouring; flows in networks: max-flow min-cut theorem, minimum cost flows; optimization on graphs: minimum-cost spanning trees, optimum branching and shortest paths. Project: two hours per week.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have taken ENGR 6111 may not receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: INDU 6121.

Description: This course covers the following wide range of operational issues in the transportation and logistics industry. Different analytical models and their solution strategies are also introduced. Overview of transportation systems including airlines, railways, ocean liners, cargo, energy transportation and pipelines; Supply chain characterization; Site location; Distribution planning; Vehicle routing; Fleet scheduling; Crew scheduling; Demand management; Replenishment management; Revenue management; Geographic information systems; Real-time network control issues. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course INDU 342. Students who have completed INDU 342 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Introduction to service strategy and operations. Service demand forecasting and development of new services. Service facility location and layout planning. Applications of decision models in service operations and service quality control. Cost analysis, queuing models, risk management and resource allocation models for service decisions. Service outsourcing and supply chain issues. Efficiency and effectiveness issues in different service sectors such as emergency force deployment, municipal resource allocation and health care. Case studies using operations research, operations management, and statistical techniques. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course INDU 466. Students who have completed INDU 466 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INDU 6121.

Description: This course analyzes various supply chain operation issues from an engineering point of view. The course covers topics such as: supply chain issues and opportunities; performance evaluation of supply chains; supply chain planning and optimization; collaborative decision making in supply chains; transportation planning in supply chains; capacity planning in supply chains; designing global supply chains; risk management in supply chains; sustainable supply chain management. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INDU 6121.

Description: This course covers various operational and planning issues in manufacturing industry: Integrated production planning and control. Large scale model development for demand forecasting, materials requirements planning and manufacturing resource planning (MRP/MRPII), production-inventory systems, production planning; models for line balancing, lot sizing, dispatching, scheduling, releasing. Models for inventory control, determination of order quantities and safety stocks, inventory replenishment systems. Supply chain management. Just-in-Time systems, lean and Agile manufacturing. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course covers topics that are necessary to establish a lean culture at the system level in various organizations: Introduction to principles of the lean enterprise, process management, waste elimination and process variation, five S’s and workplace organization, lean analysis tools and performance measurements, Lean Six Sigma, enterprise value stream mapping, visual workplace, lean product development, lean business administration. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INDU 6121.

Description: This course covers models for sequencing and scheduling activities, including: static and dynamic problems; deterministic and stochastic models; single machine processing, parallel machine processing, multistage problems including flow-shops and job-shops; complexity issues; exact and heuristic solution methods; average and worst case performance analysis of heuristic methods; applications in manufacturing environments; current research trends. Project: two hours per week.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Notes:
  • Students who have taken ENCS 6201 may not receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INDU 6211.

Description: Introduction to the basic principles and concepts of lean manufacturing; tools of lean manufacturing, including value stream mapping, standardized work, setup reduction; mapping the current state; mixed model value streams; mapping the future state; Takt time, finished goods strategy, continuous flow, level pull, pacemaker, pitch, interval; implementing the future state. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course is designed to provide advanced concepts, theory and procedures for the study of facilities location, physical layouts, material flow, and material handling, warehouse operations planning and management systems, warehouse design, automation and control. Analytical procedures are developed to enhance the decision-making process in the design, rationalization and improvement of manufacturing or service facilities. The knowledge learned in this course is integrated with knowledge from related courses to develop a design project. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course introduces probability and statistics concepts frequently used in engineering applications. Probability theory, randomness, conditional probability, joint probability, independence and probability distributions are covered. Data collection, sampling, confidence intervals, hypothesis formulation, errors, estimation topics are given. Linear and non-linear regression, analysis of residuals and remedial measures, transformation of data, multiple, polynomial and weighted regression, model selection techniques, and joint confidence regions concepts are taught with relevant industry applications. Statistical packages are introduced. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course may not be taken by MASc and PhD students for credit.

Description: Probability theory and queuing theory; discrete and continuous variables and their distributions; deterministic and stochastic models; building valid and credible models. Computer simulation of discrete-change systems subject to uncertainty techniques to verify quality of input data; analysis of output data; determination of simulation run-length and number of replications; random number generations, variance reduction techniques, transient and steady state behaviour; comparison of alternative systems. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have taken ENGR 6491 may not receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INDU 6310.

Description: This course offers an overview of the Six Sigma concept; Six Sigma deployment practice; Six Sigma methodologies for process improvement and process (DMAIC) and for product design (DMADV); Integration of Lean techniques in Six Sigma (Lean Six Sigma); Overview of different quality management tools applied in Six Sigma; Application of Designed of Experiments in Six Sigma; Design for Six Sigma through the application of the Robust Parameter Design; Six Sigma project management. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course INDU 441. Students who have completed INDU 441 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Introduction to advanced quality control and improvement concepts. Fundamentals of statistical methods and theoretical basis for quality control methods. Advanced and newly developed quality control and improvement methods such as modified and acceptance charts, multiple stream process control, control charts with adaptive sampling and engineering process control for quality. International standards of acceptance sampling. Economic design and implications of quality control and improvement procedures. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: The foundations of modern quality improvement, scientific basis of quality engineering, statistical experimental design issues such as randomized blocks, factorial designs at two levels, fractional factorial designs at two levels, applications on factorial designs, building models, and explanation and critique of Taguchi’s contributions. A project on selected topics is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course.
  • Students who have taken MECH 6461 may not receive credit for this course.

Description: Review of probability theory; definition of various measures (reliability, availability, MTTF, etc.) and related probability distributions; reliability evaluation of redundant systems (series, parallel, series-parallel, bridge network, etc.); two and three parameter Weibull analysis; failure data analysis; trend analysis; goodness of fit test (Kolmogorov/Smirnov test); introduction of stress-strength modelling; homogeneous Markov models; reliability evaluation of cold, warm, and hot standby systems; introduction to reliability testing; case studies. Knowledge of a first course in probability theory is assumed. Project: two hours per week.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have taken ENGR 6451 may not receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Permission of the instructor is required.

Description: Topics include mathematical modelling of industrial and service systems by integer programming (IP); choices in model formulations; optimality, relaxations and bounds; well-solved problems in IP; computational complexity; branch-and-bound methods; polyhedral theory and cutting plane algorithms; Lagrangean duality; software for solving IPs; other optimization techniques. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INDU 6111.

Description: Topics include an overview of stochastic optimization models; two-stage and multi-stage stochastic programming; algorithms for solving large-scale stochastic programming models, including sample average approximation (SAA), L-shaped method and scenario decomposition algorithms; robust optimization approach. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for the course INDU 691 (Stochastic Optimization) may not take this course for credit.

Description: Topics include an introduction to reliability function; reliability program; failure; requirement allocation and design optimization; painless risk management; design optimization by test; validation; durability; stressstrength; nuisances and no fault found (NFF); operating with failure; fail-safe and operating with failure; real-time health monitoring. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have taken INDU 691 (Application of Reliability Engineering) may not receive credit for this course.

Description: Topics include fundamentals of product design and system validation methodologies to establish maintenance programs; design of experiment, test for design validation, pass/fail analysis, reliability growth models, reliability centred maintenance, test for manufacturing; accelerated life and stress tests; failure reporting, analysis and corrective action systems (FRACAS), maintenance programs, lifecycle analysis, end-of-life analysis and industrial approach for reliability; concepts and topics will be covered through real-life case studies. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have taken INDU 691 (Reliability and Maintenance for Design and Manufacturing) may not receive credit for this course.

Description: Elements of anatomy, physiology and psychology; auditory and visual display engineering; engineering anthropometry; human capabilities and limitations; manual material handling: design of work places, human-machine system design; shift work and jet lag; acquisition and retention of skill; toxicity and hazard; human reliability. A project on a current topic is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course INDU 412. Students who have completed INDU 342 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INDU 6310.

Description: This course covers a variety of topics in safety engineering that provide the necessary knowledge and skills in order for engineers to design and manage systems where life-critical components will perform as expected, even when sub-components fail. Design concepts for safe operation with failure, design for human error and design for availability are introduced. Generic and safety dedicated engineering techniques are taught. Common safety management architectures for service and manufacturing systems, existing safety standards, guidelines in different industries, and their impact on the design processes across the life cycle of a product from initial concept to continuous certification are included. A project is required.

Component(s): Reading


Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INDU 6121.

Description: Topics include mathematical modeling and optimization methods in healthcare problems, healthcare staff planning and scheduling, operating room management, and appointment scheduling in clinics. Other operational issues such as production and delivery of radio-pharmaceuticals, resource allocation and capacity planning in hospitals, ambulance redeployment and dispatching are discussed. Finally, system-level healthcare planning and management tools and methods such as routing and scheduling of caregivers in home-health industries, healthcare facility location, inventory management of blood products, kidney exchange optimization and optimization in radiation therapy (intensity-modulated radiation - IMRT and volumetric modulated arc therapy - VMAT) are introduced. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course INDU 431. Students who have completed INDU 431 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: INDU 6121; INDU 6310.

Description: The course covers Analytics as it is divided into three categories according to functional classification of analytics methods: descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive. By taking a hands-on teaching approach, graduate students are taught a set of techniques of descriptive and predictive analytics, which emphasizes extensive analysis of real (or realistic) data sets from a variety of organizations such as manufacturing, service and healthcare using statistical packages. Students are also taught techniques for proper visualization and presentation of the results of their analysis. Specific analytics methods such as logistic regression, time series, decision trees, support vector machines, k-nearest neighbors, k-means are covered. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Subject matter will vary from term to term and from year to year.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students may re-register for these courses provided that the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by changes to the course title in the graduate class schedule

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of 16 credits in the program prior to enrolling.

Description: A supervised design, simulation or experimental capstone design project in the students’ area of specialization. Students may work in groups to undertake: a. A project with a company, governmental organization, or an NGO, supervised jointly by a faculty member and a member of the partner organization; b. An engineering design that has potential to be commercialized, where a faculty member or District 3 representative supervises the project. Students may also opt to tackle a research problem under the supervision of a faculty member. A written report and a public presentation is required. Final report must include a detailed description of the industry experience or the research problem and clearly outline the engineering analysis.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students cannot take this course for credit towards MASc or PhD degrees.

  • This is a two-term course (Fall and Winter only).

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must have completed a minimum of 16 credits in the program prior to enrolling.

Description: The Industrial Stage I is designed to provide students with the opportunity to complete an engineering management project in a company, governmental organization, or a NGO under the supervision of an organization partner and a faculty member. Students are required to provide a written report and give a seminar.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Notes:
  • Students cannot take this course for credit towards MASc or PhD degrees.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INDU 6991.

Description: The Industrial Stage II is designed to provide students with the additional opportunity to complete the second engineering management project in a company, governmental organization, or a NGO under the supervision of an organization partner and a faculty member. Students are required to provide a written report and give a seminar.

Notes:
  • Students cannot take this course for credit towards MASc or PhD degrees.

Description: Principles and operating characteristics of fluidic elements; modelling of wall attachment; beam deflection; turbulent and vortex amplifiers; design and analysis of microdiaphram and diaphram ejector amplifiers; methods of evaluation performance characteristics of fluid devices; passive fluidic elements; digital and analog fluidic circuit theories and their applications; case studies of fluidic systems. A project on selected topics is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6101 or equivalent.

Description: Analog and digital control system design. Analog controller design methods: lead and lag compensators, pole placement, model matching, two-parameter configuration, plant input/output feedback configuration. Introduction to state-space control system. State estimator and state feedback. Introduction to digital control system. Z-transform. Difference equations. Stability in the Z-domain. Digital implementation of analog controllers. Equivalent digital plant method. Alias signals. Selection of sampling time. PID controller. A project on specific topic or applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with MECH 473. Students who have received credit for MECH 473 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Permission of the instructor is required.

Description: Theory and application of virtual systems with an emphasis on virtual prototyping of mechanical systems. Virtual system modelling: particle systems, rigid body systems, lumped parameter models, and multi-domain system modelling. Non-real-time simulation methods: numerical integration methods, stiff systems and implicit methods. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HIL): Real-time simulation, multi-rate simulation and scheduling. Stability, invariance, and robustness. Virtual environments. Distributed simulation and time delay analysis. Design and analysis of virtual engineering systems: specification, design, verification, validation and prototype testing. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Dynamics of mechanical and chemical processes: linear and nonlinear system capacity, resistance, piping complexes; characteristics and dynamics of control valves; process time constants; proportional, reset and derivative control actions; feed forward and cascade control, direct digital control case studies on design of level control; p-4 control and heat exchanger control; analysis of industrial hazards and security. A project on selected topics of current interest is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course. Students who have received credit for the undergraduate equivalent version may not take this course for credit.

Description: Introduction to fluid power control technology; fundamentals of fluid transmission media; basic hydraulic control system components and circuits; hydraulic servosystems; modelling and dynamic analysis of hydraulic systems – design examples; basic pneumatic control system components and circuits – design examples. A projects on selected topics is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course. Students who have taken the undergraduate equivalent version may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6201.

Description: Introduction to fuel control systems for combustion engines with fuel injection. Dynamics of fuel injection for steady-state and transient process; injection characteristics for different combustion patterns; speed and power control in relation to engine characteristics; design principles of fuel systems; special requirements for starting, shut-down, schedule modulation; testing methods; wear and reliability problems. Case studies include: multicylinder in-line injection pump, rotary distributor injection pump, mecano-pneumatic fuel control unit. Full term project work on alternative fuel delivery systems and emissions control for combustion engines. Modelling and simulation. Demonstration of alternative fuel injection system on diesel engine in lab.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6101 or equivalent.

Description: Basics of flight dynamics modelling: axes systems and notation; equations of motion; aerodynamic forces and moments, airplane stability, aircraft on the ground; simulator flight model design. Flight instruments: classification; principles of operation, cockpit displays. Flight controls basics: configuration; control forces; primary and secondary controls. Introduction to automatic flight control: stability augmentation; autopilots; flight guidance and flight management systems; design examples. Flight simulation: classification; standards and regulations; system configuration and components. Projects on selected topics are required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Equations of state for gases; molecular explanation of equations of state; introduction to quantum mechanics; the molecular theory of thermal energy and heat capacity; molecular velocity distribution, molecular collisions and the transport properties of gases, introduction to chemical kinetics. A project on specific topic or applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Combined effects in one-dimensional flow; multidimensional flow; method of characteristics; one-dimensional treatment of non-steady gas dynamics; shock wave interactions; instability phenomena of supersonic intake diffusers; shock-boundary layer interactions. Projects on unsteady gas dynamics and on shock wave propagation and interactions are required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with MECH 461. Students who have received credit for MECH 461 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6201.

Description: Flow conservation equations, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, inviscid irrotational and rotational flows: the Euler equations, the potential and stream function equations. Kelvin, Stokes and Helmholtz theorems. Elementary flows and their superposition, panel method for non-lifting bodies. Airfoil and wing characteristics, aerodynamics forces and moments coefficients. Flow around thin airfoils, Biot-Savart law, vortex sheets. Flow around thick airfoils, the panel method for lifting bodies. Flow around wings, Prandtl’s lifting line theory, induced angle and downwash, unswept wings, swept compressibility correction rules, the area rule. Transonic flow: small disturbance equation, full potential equation, supercritical airfoils. A project on specific topic or applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have completed AERO 464 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Solutions by analytical, numerical, and analogue methods of steady and transient temperature fields with and without heat sources; introduction to convection. Basic concepts and relations of radiation heat transfer, radiation of strongly absorbing media, and radiation of weakly absorbing media. A project on selected topics is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Review of heat transfer and flow losses; design consideration of heat exchangers; double pipe exchanger; shell and tube exchanger; extended surfaces; condenser, evaporator, regenerator, cooling tower. A project on selected topics is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MECH 6171.

Description: Study of practical criteria which influence the design of a gas turbine engine including relevant mechanical and aerodynamic constraints. The aerodynamics of each of the three major components of a modern turbo-fan engine, namely the compressor, the combustor and the turbine is considered. Air system acoustics, engine aerodynamic matching of components and modern performance testing methods. A design project is assigned for each of these components. A project on specific topic or applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course AERO 465. Students who have completed AERO 465 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6201.

Description: Review of the gas turbine engine cycle and components arrangement. Types of turbo-propulsion for aircraft: turboprop, turbofan and turbojet. Energy transfer in incompressible and compressible turbomachines: the Euler equation, velocity triangles. Axial-flow compressors; mean-line analysis. Mechanisms of losses in turbomachines. Three-dimensional motion in turbomachines; the radial equilibrium equation and its numerical solution by finite difference methods. Dimensional analysis of incompressible and compressible flow in turbomachines, compressor and turbine performance maps; surge and stall. Centrifugal compressors. Axial-flow turbines. Prediction of performance of gas turbines, components matching. Projects on selected topics are required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course AERO 462. Students who have completed AERO 462 may not take this course for credit.

Description: The effect of air temperature, humidity and purity on physiological comfort; overall heat transmission coefficients of building sections, air infiltration, ventilation and solar radiation loads; heating and air conditioning load calculations; heating, air conditioning and ventilating systems, equipment and controls; design of hot water piping and air distribution systems, pressure drop calculations; selection and specifications of mechanical equipment for heating, ventilation and air conditioning applications. A project on selected applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course MECH 453. Students who have completed MECH 453 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MECH 6111.

Description: Chemical thermodynamics; review of chemical kinetics; conservation equations for multicomponent reacting systems; detonation and deflagration of premixed materials; premixed laminar flames; gaseous diffusion flames, droplet combustion; turbulent flames; two-phase reacting systems; chemically reacting boundary layers. Projects on selected topics are required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously or concurrently: MECH 6311 and MECH 6121.

Description: Fundamental aspects of helicopter technology; rotary wing aerodynamics; aeromechanical stability; hover and forward flight performance; ground and air resonance; introduction to vibration and structural dynamic problems in helicopter; case studies in the rotorcraft field. Case studies and projects on selected topics are required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MECH 6121.

Description: Introduction to fixed-wing aircraft operation. Flying environment and its measurement by aircraft instrumentation. Computation of lift and drag, effects of viscosity and compressibility. Review of piston, turboprop, turbojet and turbofan powerplants. Operational performance of aircraft in climb, cruise, descent and on ground. Advanced aircraft systems. Operational considerations in aircraft design. Projects on selected topics are required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MECH 6111. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the instructor is required.

Description: Classification of space propulsion systems; Tsiolkovskij’s equation; ideal rocket and nozzle design; flight performance; basic orbital mechanics; chemical propellant rocket performance analysis; fundamentals of liquid and solid propellant rocket motors; electric, solar, fusion thruster. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6311.

Description: Torsional vibrations critical speeds, rotors driven by reciprocating machines, finite element modelling, whirling of shafts, gyroscopic effects, rotors on fluid film bearings, instability in torsional and bending vibrations, balancing, response to support excitations, condition monitoring. Projects on selected applications are required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6311.

Description: Introduction to noise and vibration, measurement units. Review of wave theory, noise control criteria and standards, sources and nature of mechanical equipment noise, devices for noise control such as silencers, baffles and acoustic enclosures. Machinery vibration sources, radiation of noise from vibrating structures, devices and methods for vibration control such as isolators, dampers, absorbers and in-situ balancing. Active control of noise and vibration. Projects on selected applications are required.

Description: Survey of practical methods for optimum design of mechanical systems; optimal performance criteria and selection of design variables. Introduction to analytical and numerical optimization methods for single- and multi-variable unconstrained problems: direct search and gradient methods. Constrained optimization. Optimality criterion techniques for mechanical systems. Case studies in the area of machine tools, structural systems, machine element design, vehicle design, and hydraulic control systems. Discussion on commercial software packages, their capability, availability and limitations. An optimization project on selected topics is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Topics include introduction to smart materials and structures; overview of mathematical models for mechanical and electrical systems; mathematical representation of smart systems; piezoelectric materials and their constitutive equations; electromechanical coupling in piezoelectric based systems and structures and their governing equations; shape memory alloys and their constitutive models; electrical activation of shape memory alloys and their dynamic modelling; electrorheological (ER) and magnetorheological (MR) fluids and elastomers; constitutive models for ER and MR fluids and elastomers; dynamic modelling and vibration analysis of ER and MR based adaptive devices and structures; application of smart materials as energy dissipating elements in structural systems for passive, semi-active and active vibration control; application of smart materials in motion control. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6311.

Description: Natural frequencies and normal modes of multi-degree-of-freedom systems; orthogonality of normal modes; eigenvalue and eigenvector extraction methods; vibration response using normal mode analysis; complex natural frequencies and complex modes in damped systems, modal damping random response considerations; nonsymmetric systems using biorthogonality relations; modal parameter identification from tests, application of modal analysis to mechanical systems. Projects on selected applications are required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: The course deals with mechanical behaviour of tissues in human body such as bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendons, blood vessels, muscles, skin, teeth, nerves. Classification of biological tissues; mechanical properties in vivo and in vitro testing; constitutive relationships, viscoelastic behaviour and rate/time dependency; remodelling and adaption due to mechanical loading; analogous mechanical systems. A project on current topic is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Theoretical and practical aspects of mechanics and dynamics of metal machining; tool geometry in machine and working reference systems with their transformation matrices; machinability; wear; cutting forces; temperature distribution; tool material unconventional machining; machining economics; optimizing techniques for cutting conditions; surface mechanics and application of random processes. A project on selected topics is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Contact between stationary surfaces; dry friction; rolling contract; wear; boundary lubrication; lubricating oils and greases; hydrodynamic journal bearings; case studies in Tribology as applied to design and manufacturing problems. A project on specific topic or applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Stress analysis for design of elastic and visco-elastic mechanical components subject to thermal, fatigue, vibrational and chemical environments; buckling and creep; cumulative damage. Case studies, and project from selected applications are required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Concept of value and decision theory in design; design application and case studies in the implementation of digital computer-oriented design of engineering systems. Examples include design of specific machine elements, design of vehicle suspension, hydraulic positioning systems, ship propulsion system, multi-speed gear box, and cam drives. Introduction to identification, optimization, and parameter sensitivity. Implementation of these methods uses remote terminals and graphic display units. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MECH 6441 or equivalent.

Description: Aero/performance aspects of aircraft structures; Airworthiness and design considerations; Materials; Static, vibratory and aeroelastic loadings; Propulsion-induced loadings; Functions and fabrication of structural components; Stress analysis of wings, fuselages, stringers, fuselage frames, wing ribs, cut-outs in wings and fuselages, and laminated structures; Buckling of aircraft structures: local buckling, instability of stiffened panels; flexural-torsional buckling; Fracture and fatigue failures. Case studies.

Component(s): Lecture


Description: Aerodynamic loading of elastic airfoils; phenomenon of divergence; effect of flexible control surface on divergence of main structure; divergence of one- and two-dimensional wing models; phenomenon of flutter; flutter of two- and three-dimensional wings; approximate analysis techniques; flutter prevention and control; panel flutter in high speed vehicles; flutter of turbomachine bladings; vortex induced oscillations; bridge buffeting. A project on specific applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course AERO 431. Students who have completed AERO 431 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Introduction to metrology, linear and geometric tolerancing, non-optical and optical methods in form measurement, fundamentals of optical metrology, interferometry - theory and overview, Moiré and phase shifting interfereometry, speckle interferometry and holography, light sources, detectors and imaging systems. Applications to precision measurement, Doppler vibrometry and dynamic characterization, applications to MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems), and special topics include: nanometrology, X-ray interferometry and interference spectroscopy. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Advanced composites. Polymer matrix composites. Resins and fibers. Metal matrix composites. Ceramic matrix composites. Interfaces. Mechanical properties. Applications. A project on selected topics of current interest is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Mechanisms of plastic deformation at ambient and elevated temperatures; plasticity theory; mechanical forming processes; forging; rolling; extrusion; wire drawing; deep drawing; bending; results of processing; mechanical properties; residual stresses; fibrous textures and preferred orientations; effects of annealing. Process modelling by shearline or finite element analysis. A project on current research topics and selected applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course MECH 421. Students who have completed MECH 421 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Hand lay-up. Autoclave curing. Compression molding. Filament winding. Resin transfer molding. Braiding. Injection molding. Cutting. Joining. Thermoset and thermoplastic composites. Process modelling and computer simulation. Nondestructive evaluation techniques. A project on selected topics of current interest is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course MECH 425. Students who have completed MECH 425 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Phase equilibrium diagrams; mechanisms of solidification; design of castings for various moulding processes, section sizes, dimensional accuracies and surface finishes; continuous casting; control of grain size; segregation and porosity. Defects in castings. A project on current research topic and selected applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Principles of joining; fusion welding; arc, torch, plasma, electron beam, resistance, etc; solid state welding; heterogeneous hot joining (brazing, soldering); heterogeneous cold joining; metallurgy of joints; joint properties; nondestructive testing processes; radiography, ultrasonic, magnetic particle, die penetrant, etc. A project on current research topic or selected applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Fracture mechanisms; ductile and cleavage; brittle fracture; notch effects; propagation of cracks; ductile-brittle transition; inter-granular fracture; hydrogen embrittlement; fatigue initiation mechanisms; crack propagation; preventive design; creep failure, mechanisms maps, fatigue; pore formation; grain boundary sliding; high temperature alloys, testing techniques; fractography. A project on current research topics and selected applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Studies of the microstructures responsible for high strength and of the thermomechanical treatments producing these microstructures; dislocation theory; strain hardening; strengthening by solid-solution, massive hard phases, precipitation, dispersed particles, and martensitic and bainitic structures; fibre and particulate composites; surface treatments; residual stresses of thermal or mechanical origin. A project on current research topics and selected applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Electrochemical corrosion and preventative measures. Stress corrosion, corrosion fatigue. Oxidation at low and high temperatures and protective measures. Selection of alloys and coatings. A project on current research topic or selected applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Description: General applications of polymer composite materials in the aircraft, aerospace, automobile, marine, recreational and chemical processing industries. Different fibres and resins. Mechanics of a unidirectional lamina. Transformation of stress, strain, modulus and compliance. Off-axis engineering constants, shear and normal coupling coefficients. In-plane and flexural stiffness and compliance of different laminates including cross-ply, angle-ply, quasi-isotropic and general bidirectional laminates. Strength of laminates and failure criteria. Micro-mechanics. Projects on selected applications are required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course MECH 422. Students who have completed MECH 422 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Theory and practice for the determination of tensile, compression and shear properties of composite materials; techniques for the determination of physical and chemical properties; non-destructive techniques such as ultrasonics, acousto-ultrasonics, acoustic emission, infrared and lasers for evaluation of composite structures. A project on selected topics of current interest is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MECH 6451 or equivalent.

Description: Positioning and contouring NC machines, typical NC applications; analysis of typical NC systems and design considerations; components. A design project on multi-surface machine parts is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: A course in industrial electronics must be completed prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the instructor is required.

Description: Introduction to the concepts and practices of using microprocessors and micro-computers in such applications as instrumentation, manufacturing, control and automation; architecture and programming techniques; interface logic circuits; I/O systems; case studies of mechanical engineering applications. A project on specific topic or applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course MECH 471. Students who have completed MECH 471 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Introduction to mechanization of industrial processes such as machining, material handling, assembling, and quality control; selection of actuators and sensors for mechanization; design of sequential control circuits using classical methods, ladder diagram, travel-step diagram and cascade method; specifying control sequences using GRAFCET and FUP; special purpose circuits such as emergency circuits, timers, and programmable logic controllers (PLCs); case studies dealing with typical industrial manufacturing processes and computer simulation. A project on specific topic or applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Fracture mechanics and fatigue of machine elements and structures; Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM); Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM); Finite Element Analysis for fracture; LEFM and EPFM Testing; Fracture mechanics approach to fatigue crack growth problem; Constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude and stochastic loading cases; Industrial applications to mechanical design and fracture and fatigue control in machine elements and structures; Damage tolerance design. A case study or project on selected applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Analysis for design of beams, columns, rods, plates, sandwich panels and shells made of composites; anisotropic elasticity; energy methods; vibration and buckling; local buckling in sandwich structures; free edge effects and delamination; joining; and failure considerations in design. A project on selected applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Thermodynamic laws and relationships. Partial and relative state functions: Activities in multicomponent systems, reference and standard states, solution thermodynamics. Thermodynamics of phase transformations and chemical reactions in engineering materials. Calculation of thermodynamic functions and properties. Experimental methods of determining thermodynamic properties. Multicomponent and multiphasic systems. Generalized phase rules, phase diagrams, stability diagrams and other diagram types. Computational thermodynamics for developing engineering materials. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MECH 6441.

Description: Role of Finite element method in machine design. Variational principles. Formulation of the finite element problem in stress, vibration and buckling analyses of machine components. Different elements and interpolation functions. Application in machine design; fracture. A case study or project on selected applications is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Kinematics of nonholonomic systems; dynamics of nonholonomic systems, including d’Álembert principle, Euler-Lagrange equations; equations of motion of nonholonomic systems with Lagrangian multipliers; the reaction of ideal nonholonomic constraints; nonholonomic Caplygin systems; Bifurcation and stability analysis of the nonholonomic systems. Analysis and design of nonlinear control of nonholonomic systems, including kinematic control and dynamic control as well as force control. Controller designs with uncertain nonholonomic systems. Application examples including control of wheeled mobile robots and walking robots. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Microfabrication and micromachining required for optical microsystems; optical microsystem modelling, simulation, sensitivity analysis. Properties of materials suitable for optical MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems). Measurements, sensing and actuation suitable for optical microsystems. Introduction to micro-optical components; optical waveguide-based systems. Design of different optical MEMS devices. Chemical and biochemical sensing with optical microsystems. Assembly, packaging and testing of optical MEMS devices. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Introduction to mechatronics; basic elements of mechatronic systems. Measurement systems: including principles of measurement systems; sensors and transducers; signal conditioning processes and circuits; filters and data acquisition. Actuation systems: mechanical actuation systems and electrical actuation systems. Controllers: control modes; PID controller; performance measures; introduction to digital controllers and robust control. Modelling and analysis of mechatronic systems; performance measures; frequency response; transient response analysis; stability analysis. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course MECH 474. Students who have completed MECH 474 may not take this course for credit.


Description: This course focuses on analytical methods for analyses of ride, handling, stability and rollover dynamics of road vehicles. The course introduces mechanics of tires, and tire models for estimating traction/braking and cornering characteristics. Objective methods for assessing vehicle ride are defined and ride dynamics models of vehicles are formulated together with modeling of the passive, semi-active and active suspensions. Analytical methods are introduced for analyses of steady-state and transient handling, tripped and untripped roll dynamics, and directional response characteristics of road vehicles, including articulated vehicles. The course also introduces concepts in active safety and driver-assist technologies such as yaw moment and vehicle stability control systems. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course MECH 448. Students who have completed MECH 448 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course focuses on analysis and design principles surrounding the mechanical design of vehicular engines. The specific topics covered include: basic thermodynamic cycle analysis, gas exchange and combustion engine processes, combustion chambers design, fuels and fuel supply, ignition and control systems, cooling and lubrication of engines, emissions formation and control, engine operational characteristics - matching with vehicles, enhancement of engine performance, engine testing, environmental impact of vehicular engines, hybrid systems, and new developments and new trends in internal combustion engines. Students simulate a real internal combustion engine using models of the different processes covered. Students complete a project on the design of a vehicular engine.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course MECH 454. Students who have completed MECH 448 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Definition and classifications; case studies of major industrial and research vehicle prototypes; applications; kinematic modelling for feedback control of a driverless vehicle as a planar rigid body; vehicle motion and its relation to steering and drive rates of its wheels; co-ordinate systems assignment; transformation matrices; condition for rolling without skidding and sliding; sensor models and sensor integrations; dead-reckoning control; global and local path planning; introduction to dynamic modelling of driverless vehicle with and without the dynamics of wheel assemblies; design of optimal controllers; introduction to adaptive neuro-morphic controller. Projects are an integral part of the course for which the following may be used: TUTSIM, FORTRAM, or C. A project on selected topics is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This is a cross-listed course. Students who have taken the undergraduate equivalent version may not take this course for credit.

Description: Definition and classification of guided transportation systems; track characterization: alignment, gage, profile and cross-level irregularities; wheel-rail interactions: rolling contact theories, creep forces; modelling of guided vehicle components; wheelset, suspension, truck and car body configurations, suspension characteristics; performance evaluation: stability/hunting, ride quality; introduction to advanced guided vehicles. A project on selected topics is an integral part of the course.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course MECH 444. Students who have completed MECH 444 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6201.

Description: This course focuses on design principles and sizing of the following aircraft systems: hydraulic system, primary and secondary flight control actuation systems, landing gear systems, and fuel system. Traditional and new technology implementations in aircraft, helicopters and other aerospace vehicles are considered. Associated standards and regulations are described. Principles of architecture development and integration, as well as engineering tools for system sizing and simulation are covered. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course MECH 471. Students who have completed MECH 471 may not take this course for credit.


Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6201.

Description: This course focuses on design principles and sizing of the following aircraft systems: electrical power system, auxiliary and emergency power systems, environmental control system, ice and rain protection system, and pneumatic power system. Traditional and new technology implementations in aircraft, helicopters and other aerospace vehicles are considered. Associated standards and regulations are described. Principles of architecture development and integration, as well as engineering tools for system sizing and simulation are covered. A project is required, including a laboratory component.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is cross-listed with undergraduate course AERO 472. Students who have completed AERO 472 may not take this course for credit.

Component(s): Lecture; Reading

Notes:
  • Students may re-register for this course, providing that the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by changes to the course title in the graduate class schedule.

Description: Introduction: objectives, definitions, impact on product development; process modelling and optimization; forming of engineering team; selection of techniques, methodology and tools; market design focus vs. quality design focus; development time management; process integration; aerospace case studies/projects, future trends.

Component(s): Lecture

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • MECH 6961 and MECH 6971 are restricted to students registered in aerospace engineering programs at Concordia or participating universities.
  • These courses cover topical case studies drawn from aerospace industrial experience. They are conducted in a modular form by experienced engineers who specialize in one or more facets of this industry. They are given in collaboration with the other participating universities and may be conducted at any of the Montreal universities in the language of convenience to the instructor.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: MECH 6021; MECH 6061.

Description: Review of hydraulic control system technology and the need for dynamic analyses. Conventional techniques for assuring good response by analysis. Power flow modelling, power bond graphs, and digital simulation techniques. Obtaining dynamic relationships and coefficients. Phenomena which can affect dynamic response. Projects on selected topics are required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: ENGR 6201.

Description: Heat transfer in laminar flow, review of the differential and integral forms of the general energy equation for boundary layer regimes; solution of the energy equation for free convection, forced convection and heat transfer in entrance regions. Heat transfer in turbulent flow; review of the energy equation for turbulent flow; momentum-heat transfer analogies; experimental results for forced convection, free convection, and combined free and forced convection. Project or term paper required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MECH 6581.

Description: General concept involving design using composite materials. Integral approach to design. Selection of materials. Selection of fabrication techniques. Computer-aided design tools. Consideration for fracture, fatigue, buckling and impact. Joining consideration. Design of tubes, beams, columns. Design of aircraft components. A project on selected topics is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Dynamic modelling of ground vehicles for analysis of ride performance; ride comfort and safety criteria; modelling of human body; characterization of road inputs; modelling and design of vibration isolators: primary suspension, secondary suspension; active, semi-active and passive isolators; kinematic and dynamic analysis of suspension linkages; laboratory methods for performance evaluation of vehicle suspension systems; software packages and case studies. Projects on selected applications are required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MECH 6751 or equivalent.

Description: Mathematical methods in vehicle dynamics; tire and suspension modelling and design for handling; static roll; steady turning and off-tracking analysis of straight and articulated road vehicles; directional stability and braking analysis; directional response of articulated vehicles with steerable axles; software packages and case studies. Project on selected topics is an integral part of the course.

Component(s): Lecture

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students may re-register for this course, providing that the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by changes to the course title in the graduate class schedule.

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