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Religions and Cultures Courses

Religions and Cultures MA and Judaic Studies MA Courses

Required Courses (Judaic Studies MA)

Description: The guided research paper (GRP) is 11,000-12,500 words (about 40-50 pages) in length, exclusive of footnotes and bibliography. The GRP is usually undertaken in a student’s third or fourth semester (after the completion of coursework). The research paper develops themes or subjects that the student engaged during coursework. Students in the MA in Judaic Studies write on an aspect of Jewish history or culture.

Component(s): Research

Description: In this initial phase of the research preparation, students, under the guidance of their supervisor, develop and submit a statement describing the scope and content of their intended research.

Component(s): Research

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Description: This course continues to prepare students for the Guided Research Paper (GRP). Students develop and submit an annotated bibliography to the supervisor.

Component(s): Research

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Description: The proposal for the Guided Research Paper (GRP), prepared under the guidance of the supervisor, outlines the nature of the student's paper, contains a bibliography, and specifies the timeframe for completing the paper.

Component(s): Research

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Description: This is the first major step in completing the Guided Research Paper (GRP). Students submit an initial draft to the supervisor. The precise nature of this first draft is determined by the supervisor.

Component(s): Research

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Description: The Guided Research Paper (GRP) is the capstone project in which students apply the themes, methods, approaches, and material with which they have engaged during their coursework and in preparation for their project. It presents original research and is typically 10,000 - 14,000 words in length. For further specific information concerning the GRP, students should consult the departmental guidelines.

Component(s): Research

Description: Students must submit a thesis proposal on a topic chosen in consultation with the thesis supervisor and the proposal must be approved by the Department's Graduate Studies committee. The proposal for the thesis is 2,500-3,000 words in length. A thesis proposal outlines the student’s proposed research paper, locates their research in relation to existing scholarship, clarifies their methodology and research questions, and includes a bibliography of at least ten academic sources, and any primary materials (such as editions of critical texts), which the students use.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Description: Students in the MA in Judaic Studies write on an aspect of Jewish history or culture. The thesis is a work of primary research that normally runs to 18,000-24,000 words, exclusive of footnotes and bibliography. Students are expected to have the requisite language skills to undertake their proposed research, for instance in Yiddish or Hebrew.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Required Courses (Religions and Cultures MA)

Description: The guided research paper (GRP) is 11,000-12,500 words (about 40-50 pages) in length, exclusive of footnotes and bibliography. The GRP is usually undertaken in a student’s third or fourth semester (after the completion of coursework). This research paper develops themes or subjects that the student engaged during coursework.

Component(s): Research

Description: In this initial phase of the research preparation, students, under the guidance of their supervisor, develop and submit a statement describing the scope and content of their intended research.

Component(s): Research

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Description: This course continues to prepare students for the Guided Research Paper (GRP). Students develop and submit an annotated bibliography to the supervisor.

Component(s): Research

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Description: The proposal for the Guided Research Paper (GRP), prepared under the guidance of the supervisor, outlines the nature of the student's paper, contains a bibliography, and specifies the timeframe in which students complete the paper.

Component(s): Research

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Description: This is the first major step in completing the Guided Research Paper (GRP). Students submit an initial draft to the supervisor. The precise nature of this first draft is determined by the supervisor.

Component(s): Research

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Description: The Guided Research Paper (GRP) is the capstone project in which students apply the themes, methods, approaches, and material with which they have engaged during their coursework and in preparation for their project. It presents original
research and is typically 10,000 - 14,000 words in length. For further specific information concerning the GRP, students should consult the departmental guidelines.

Component(s): Research

Description: Students must submit a thesis proposal on a topic chosen in consultation with the thesis supervisor and the proposal must be approved by the Department's Graduate Studies committee. The proposal for the thesis is 2,500-3,000 words in length. A thesis proposal outlines the student’s proposed research paper, locates their research in relation to existing scholarship, clarifies their methodology and research questions, and includes a bibliography of at least ten academic sources, and any primary materials (such as editions of critical texts), which the students use.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Description: The thesis is a work of primary research that normally runs to 18,000-24,000 words in length, exclusive of footnotes and bibliography. Students are expected to have the requisite language skills to undertake their proposed research.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Topics in Judaic Studies (MA)

Description: This course analyzes the sacred texts of Judaism and its interpretation through the ages. It enables students to comprehend the historical contexts and transitions of text as shifts and adjustments prevail. Topics may also include contemporary literature and popular transmissions of foundational texts into the present.

Component(s): Seminar

Description: This course covers the history, literature and ethnography of Canada's Jews. Exploring both the experiences and expressions of Canadian Jewry, the course examines lived religion and scarcely explored communal documents. Students are exposed to a variety of methodological approaches, such as literary criticism, ethnography and historiography.

Component(s): Seminar

Description: This course examines Jewish philosophy in various historical periods. Topics may include ethics, metaphysics, cosmology, Jewish thought post-Holocaust, and reflections on the State of Israel. The course may focus on select Jewish thinkers or particular philosophical corpora.

Component(s): Seminar

Description: This course explores the study of Jewish history and communities through material and popular culture. Topics may include the production and use of objects, images, ornament, iconography, epigraphy, and sacred space, art, film, and music. It considers how attention to material and popular culture allows for a nuanced understanding of the complexity and variety of Jewish cultures.

Component(s): Seminar

Description: This course examines Jewish communities in particular historical and cultural regions, notably the Middle East and Israel, North America, and Eastern Europe. It emphasizes how Jewish communities have interacted with outsiders, constructed intercommunal boundaries, responded to patterns of migration and immigration, and been shaped by changing social and political circumstances in these particular locations.

Component(s): Seminar

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Permission of the Graduate Program Directoris required.

Description: In this course, students work in a local Jewish community organization or institution in order to apply their training in religions and cultures to address real-world problem solving around religious tolerance, diversity, or issues of social justice. Examples include, working as a religious educator inside or alongside a particular religious community; organizing and supporting grassroots of Jewish communities, or organizations working with these, in regards to social issues, such as sustainability, racism and Islamophobia, anti-Judaism, disability, LGBTQ, or Indigenous rights.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Topics in Religions and Cultures (MA)

Description: This course provides students with an understanding of the major approaches to the academic study of religion. It introduces students to key theories of religion as a social and cultural phenomenon, as well as contemporary methodologies and the ways in which they colour, control, and reflect the representation of religious experience and expression. Students develop a critical theoretical orientation for their research and a familiarity with the skills that they apply in their coursework and final paper.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for RELI 609 or 610 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course analyzes literature or sacred writings in their historical context. It addresses contemporary literature and popular written media, or alternatively, focuses on foundational corpora of a community. Emphasis is placed on familiarizing students with literary and textual critical approaches to the materials under study.

Component(s): Seminar

Description: This course familiarizes students with theoretical approaches drawn from anthropology and ethnography to the study of religions and cultures. It focuses primarily on contemporary forms of lived religion, and examines topics such as mission and conversion, ritual practice, sacred space and pilgrimage, constructions of public and private, and conceptions of the secular.

Component(s): Seminar

Description: This course examines ethical, philosophical, and natural scientific approaches to religious studies. Topics may include religious ethics, constructions of the sacred, the self and the body, cosmology and metaphysics, religion and the natural world as well as the evolutionary and cognitive study of religion.

Component(s): Seminar

Description: This course explores how the history of religions can be understood through material and popular culture. Topics may include the production and use of objects, images, ornament, iconography, epigraphy, and sacred space, art, film, and music. It considers how attention to material and/or popular culture can enhance the study of religious and cultural concepts and practices.

Component(s): Seminar

Description: This course familiarizes students with perspectives on gender and sexuality within particular cultural contexts and/or religious traditions. It also introduces students to theoretical approaches drawn from feminist, gender, and/or queer studies.

Component(s): Seminar

Description: This course  focuses on a particular historical and cultural region, for instance, Tibet/East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, or North America. Its goal is to give students a nuanced and deeper understanding of an area of the world. Courses emphasize the coexistence and interdependence of traditions and communities over time, migration and immigration, responses to and conceptions of difference, and responses to changing social and political circumstances.

Component(s): Seminar

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Permission of the Graduate Program Director is required.

Description: In this course, students work in a local community organization or institution in order to apply their training in religions and cultures to address real-world problem solving around religious tolerance, diversity, or issues of social justice. Examples include working on programming with Concordia’s Multi-faith and Spirituality Centre; working as a religious educator inside or alongside a particular religious community; organizing and supporting grassroots efforts related to ethics and social justice, such as sustainability, racism and Islamophobia, disability, LGBTQ, or Indigenous rights.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Religion PhD Courses

Required Courses (Religion PhD)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: All course work must be completed prior to enrolling.

Description: Graduate students in Religion at the doctoral level are expected to pursue a program of independent study and research in their chosen field. The comprehensive examination will consist of three written exams followed by an oral examination which reviews these exams. In most cases, two of these written exams focus on topics from two distinct religious traditions; the third written exam will be on a topic related to a student’s proposed thesis. One of the three exams should include a focus on theory and methodology. Credits are not distributed among these four examinations.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Notes:
  • The thesis research is graded as pass/fail.

Description: Each candidate will prepare a doctoral thesis which is to be an original contribution to scholarship. Although the topic should be provisionally chosen and serve as a coordinating factor throughout the student’s doctoral program, a written proposal must be formally submitted and approved by the Graduate Studies Committee after the successful completion of the comprehensive examination.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Enrolment in the Religion PhD is normally required.

Description: This seminar will deal with general and methodological issues in the study of religion.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Discussion and readings will be both in English and in French.
  • All PhD students must register for this course in their first or second or equivalent year of study. This course will be held in common with UQAM and Université Laval.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Enrolment in the Religion PhD, Religions and Cultures Specialization is required.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • All PhD students must register for this course in their first or second or equivalent year of study.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Enrolment in the Religion PhD, Judaic Studies Specialization is required.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • All PhD students must register for this course in their first or second or equivalent year of study.

Topics in Judaic Studies (PhD)

A student is required to register for a minimum of 18 credits of directed reading. These courses are offered according to the resources of the department and the needs of the students. They are grouped into RELI 800-818 (Topics in Judaic Studies) and RELI 820-839 (Topics in Religions and Cultures). Some of the courses at the Master of Arts level are open to PhD candidates, with the requirement of additional work and higher standards of performance.

Description: A student is required to register for a minimum of 18 credits of directed reading. These courses are offered according to the resources of the department and the needs of the students. They are grouped into RELI 800-818 (Topics in Judaic Studies) and RELI 820-839 (Topics in Religions and Cultures). Some of the courses at the Master of Arts level are open to PhD candidates, with the requirement of additional work and higher standards of performance.

Component(s): Seminar

Topics in Religions and Cultures (PhD)

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