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Information Systems Engineering Courses

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Permission of the CIISE is required.

Description: This course emphasizes the architecture and the inner workings of the Java virtual machine; 3 distributions of the Java Platform: the micro-addition, the standard addition and the enterprise addition; the JCP process and the Java standards purposed as API extensions; semantic foundations of Java: static semantics and dynamic semantics. Introduction of technologies that are used to accelerate (performance analysis, hardware accelerators, ahead-of-time, just-in-time, selected dynamic compilation and component-based acceleration) and secure (virtual machines, such as vulnerability analysis, Java security models, byte-code verification, access controllers, security managers, policy files, and certified compilation) Java. Semantic correctness of acceleration and security techniques will also be addressed. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Introduction to cryptography and cryptanalysis, classical ciphers, number-theoretic reference problems, the integer factorization problem, the RSA problem, the quadratic residuosity problem, computing square roots in Zn, the discrete logarithmic problem, the diffie-hellman problem, pseudorandom bits and sequences, stream ciphers: feedback shift registers, LFSRs, RC4. Block Ciphers: SPN and Fiestel structures, DES, AES, linear cryptanalysis, differential cryptanalysis, side channel attacks, ciphertext indistinguishability, attack analysis, IND-CPA, IND-CCA, IND-CCA2, public key encryption: RSA, Rabin, ElGamal, elliptic curves cryptography, hash functions: Un-keyed hash functions, MACs, Attacks, Digital signatures: RSA, Fiat-Shamir, DSA, public key infrastructure, key management, efficient implementation of ciphers, zero-knowledge proof. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INSE 6110 or equivalent.

Description: Cryptographic protocols, authentication protocols, key distributions protocols, e-commerce protocols, fair-exchange and contract-signing protocols, security protocol properties: authentication, secrecy, integrity, availability, non-repudiation, atomicity, certified delivery, crypto-protocol attacks, design principles for security protocols, automatic analysis, public key infrastructure, models and architectures for network security, authentication using Kerberos and X.509, email security (PGP, S/MIME), IP security, SSL/TLS protocols, virtual private networks, firewalls intrusion detection, host-based IDS, network based IDS, misuse detection methods, anomaly detection methods, intrusion detection in distributed systems, intrusion detection in wireless ad hoc networks botnet detection, analysis and mitigation, darknet traffic analysis, prediction and forecast of network threats, network security monitoring. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INSE 6110 or equivalent.

Description: System security, Windows security, Linux security, Unix security, access control matrix, HRU result, OS security mechanisms, security administration, access control list, capability list, role-based access control, security policy, mandatory and discretionary access control, multi-level security, BLP policy, Biba model, conflict of interest, Chinese Wall policy, secure booting, authentication, password security, challenge response, auditing and logging, system kernel security, threat analysis, security attacks, security hardened operating, host-based intrusion detection, securing network services, firewalls and border security, registry security, embedded and real-time OS security, information flow control. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INSE 6110 or equivalent.

Description: Malicious code, taxonomy, viruses, worms, trojan horses, logical and temporal bombs, infection process, security properties of applications, safety, high level security, detection approaches, ad hoc techniques: scanning, anti-virus technology, obfuscation, dynamic analysis for security: passive and active monitoring, in-line and reference monitors, sandboxing, static analysis for security: data and control flow analysis for security, type-based analysis for security, anti-reverse-engineering protection, software fingerprinting, self-certified code: certifying compilers, proof carrying code, efficient code certification, typed assembly languages, certificate generation, certificate verification and validation, C and C++ security, java security, byte-code verification, access controllers, security managers, permission files, security APIs, critical APIs, protection domains, security profiles, mobile code security. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Security evaluation of information systems, security evaluation of software, security evaluation of products. Security code inspection, security testing, security standards, preparation of a security evaluation: impact scale, likelihood scale, severity scale. Vulnerability analysis, risk analysis, security plan elaboration. ITSEC, MARION, and MEHARI methods, OCTAVE, common criteria, target of evaluation, protection profile, security functional requirement, security factors, errors, accidents, assurance requirements, assurance levels, evaluation process, compliance with the protection profile, IT security ethics, privacy, digital copyright, licensing IT security products, computer fraud and abuse, incident handling, business records, security forensics, security evaluation case studies. Information security governance: risk management, business strategy, standards, COBIT. Situation awareness. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INSE 6110 or equivalent.

Description: Access control in relational databases; grant/revoke model; security by views; query modification; Oracle VPD; auditing in databases; information warfare in databases; multi-level database security; polyinstantiation and covert channel; statistical database security; inference control; security by auditing; microdata security; random perturbation; outsourced database security, encrypted databases; SQL injection attack; anomaly detection in databases; data privacy, P3P; Hippocratic databases; perfect secrecy-based privacy; k-anonymity model; l-diversity; data utility measure, data release with public algorithms, multi-party privacy preserving computation; privacy in OLAP. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for INSE 691 (Database Security and Privacy) may not take this course for credit.

Description: Security architecture and management, risk and threats, security attributes and properties, security design principles, security standards, security defence toolkit, and security building blocks, corporate VoIP, residential IPTV, IMS, cloud services, security functions and their implementation, operational considerations of deployment and management of security, configuration, vulnerability management and updates, incident management, emerging challenges and innovative solutions. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Introduction to data mining and its applications; privacy legislations security and privacy threats caused by current data mining techniques; risks and challenges in emerging data mining applications; attacks and prevention methods: web privacy attacks, data mining-based intrusion detection; privacy-preserving data mining; privacy-preserving data publishing. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for INSE 691 (Security Implications of Data Mining) may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INSE 6110 or equivalent.

Description: Introduction to wireless network security; security issues in cellular networks; authentication/key management in wireless LAN; secure handover; security in mobile IP; security issues in mobile ad-hoc networks: trust establishment, secure routing, anonymity; anonymous sensory data collection; privacy for smartphone applications. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for INSE 691 (Wireless Security) may not take this course for credit.

Description: Methodologies for quality engineering: six sigma, ACE (Achieving Competitive Excellence), Lean engineering, ISO9000 series; comparative study, quality clinic process charts, relentless root cause analysis, mistake proofing, market feedback analysis, process improvement and waste elimination, visual control, standard work and process management, process certification, setup reduction, total productive maintenance, DMAIC and DMADV processes, define phase, project charter, project scoping and planning, measure phase, critical to quality requirements, quality functional deployment, analyze phase, functional and process requirements, design requirements, design concepts, high-level design capability elaboration and evaluation, design phase, detailed design capability elaboration and evaluation, failure mode and effects analysis, control and verification plans, verify phase, pilot-scale processes, pilot testing and evaluation, implementation planning, full-scale processes, start-up and testing, performance evaluation, turnover to operations and maintenance, transition to process management, project closure. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Introduction to quality control and total quality, statistical concepts and techniques in quality control, graphical methods for data presentation and quality improvement, statistical basis for control charts, pattern analysis in control charts, control charts for variables, control charts for individual measurements, control charts for attributes, process capability analysis, CUSUM charts and EWMA charts, acceptance sampling by attributes, acceptance plans by variables, reliability models, reliability and life testing plans, multivariate quality control, multivariate methods, aspects of multivariate analysis, multivariate normal distribution, multivariate tests of hypotheses, multivariate analysis of variance, principal components analysis, factor analysis, discrimination and classification, multivariate quality control, multivariate linear regression, design of experiments (DOE), Taguchi method, completely randomized design (CRD), randomized complete block design (RCBD), incomplete block designs, latin square designs, graeco-latin square designs, factorial designs, fractional factorial designs, split plot designs, and nested designs (compared to cross-over designs), quality in the service sector, service industries and their characteristics, model for service quality and applications. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Role of a project manager, learning and applications, project management processes, project management in quality initiatives, intellectual property protection, customer project management and critical-to-quality requirements, project planning and execution, team formation, goals, roles, procedures and interpersonal relationship, types of teams, creating a project plan, project tracking, project compliance requirements, sourcing and supplier qualification, government contract data rights, government property, risk management process, action planning, project communication, customer, team and stakeholder communications, communication planning and strategy, web-based collaboration, project management software tools. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Communication plan elaboration, preparing presentations, developing a sound strategy, organizing for effectiveness, capturing the audience, the impromptu speech, introducing a speaker, reading a paper, leading a conference, interpersonal communication, use of voice, active listening, assertive speaking, giving and receiving feedback, assertive techniques, work styles, conflict and dispute resolution, negotiation, managing difficult situations, writing skills, interpersonal communications, business letters, formal reports, communication technology. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: INSE 6210 or equivalent; COMP 5541 or equivalent.

Description: Quality methodologies for software, calculating sigma values, graphical analysis, quality processes for software, MAIC, DMADV, define overview, project context, initial analysis and design, lifecycle and multi-generational planning, project management, risk analysis, measure overview, customer needs, quality functional deployment for software, software metrics and requirements, scorecards, meta-models, specification languages (SDL, B, Z, etc.), software modelling (UML, Core, IDEF, etc.), graphical languages, design and verify overview, failure mode and effect analysis for software, defensive programming, smart and simple design, peer reviews, performance analysis, statistical tools, software testing, software verification. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: INSE 6210 or equivalent; COMP 5541 or equivalent.

Description: Quality assurance, quality factors, components of a software quality assurance system, contract review, software development and quality plans, activities and alternatives, integration of quality activities in a project lifecycle, reviews, software inspection, software verification, testing processes, static analysis, control-flow analysis, data-flow analysis, control-flow testing, loop testing, data-flow testing, transaction-flow testing, domain testing, type-based analysis, dynamic analysis, usage models, operational profiles, result and defect analysis, reliability, performance analysis, maintenance and reverse engineering, case tools and software quality assurance. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INSE 6210 or equivalent.

Description: System engineering, quality-based system development process, acquisition and specification of system requirements, system design and prototyping, system implementation and testing, modelling languages for system engineering (SysML, IDEF, CORE, etc.), exchange mechanisms for system engineering data (AP233, XMI, etc.) gathering, specification, formulation, and refinement of system requirements, customer requirements, market requirements, technical requirements, implementation requirements, eco-requirements (scenario-based requirements gathering and refinement, affinity diagram, analytic hierarchy analysis), conflict resolution (TRIZ), management of system requirements in the design process (axiomatic design, decision tree, morphology matrix, systematic design), management of system requirements in the implementation process (six-sigma, ACE, Lean, ISO 9000, ERP, SAP, CMMS), case studies. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: INSE 6210 or equivalent.

Description: Introduction to quality assurance and quality factors in systems engineering, components of a quality assurance system, principles of verification, validation and accreditation of systems, Vvsystem modelling languages, model semantics, techniques for V principles of system simulation (types of problems, simulation systems and their classification, principles of simulation system design and implementation), verification and validation techniques for simulation models (problem entity, conceptual model, and computerized model), development of simulation platforms, standards for system simulation, high level architecture (HLA). A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Evolution of supply chain, lingo, notation, master planning, role in business, performance analysis, activity profiling, strategic quality planning for supply chain, inventory planning and management (IP&M), perfect order percentage, inventory turns, fill rates and substitutions, purchase and customer order cycle times, customer service and order processing (CS&OP), network planning, supply contracts, distribution strategies, coordinated product and supply chain design, quality and innovation in product design, design for maintainability, designing for reliability, environmental considerations in supply chain design, designing quality services, make, buy, and sourcing analysis, supplier partnerships, global sourcing active assembly, supply chain management systems, efficient transportation, efficient warehousing, impact of e-commerce on supply chains, information technology and decision support systems, e-business strategies, e-business transactions, e-commerce platforms for supply chain. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Supply chain management, definition, models, evolution and evaluation, quality attributes, evaluation criteria, key supply chain management issues, supply chain cost reduction opportunities, sales and operating planning hierarchy, gathering data required for sales and operation planning, inventory management techniques, effective supply chain management, supply and demand synchronization, aligning customer demands to order fulfillment, management of supply chain constraints, supply chain performance measurements, supply chain Information, communication, security, information flows, security measures, global supply chain quality and international quality standards, customer driven quality, managing supplier quality in the supply chain, the tools of quality; statistically based quality improvement for variables and attributes; managing quality improvement teams and projects. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Maintenance concepts in engineering systems; component replacement; optimal component preventive replacement intervals; age-based replacement models for components; spare parts provision; optimal inspection decisions; condition based maintenance systems; proportional hazards model; capital equipment replacement; maintenance resource planning; reliability centered maintenance; equipment degradation analysis; degradation prediction; maintenance information system; maintenance software. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for INSE 691 (Systems Engineering Maintenance Management) may not take this course for credit.

Description: This multi-disciplinary course will provide the basic knowledge for developing advanced information systems that can be used to systematically plan and manage infrastructure (e.g. roads and bridges) throughout its lifecycle, including environmental impact assessment. The course will cover the following topics: Definition and history of Infrastructure, Types and functions of Infrastructure, Infrastructure Planning, Performance Modelling, Failure Analysis and Reliability Issues, Infrastructure Inspection and Monitoring, Maintenance and Rehabilitation Strategies, Environmental Management and Sustainability Issues, and Integrated Infrastructure Management Systems. Projects.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Introduction to risk analysis theory. Risk assessment methodologies, risk assessment techniques and standards for information systems, review of probability theory, hazard identification, fault tree analysis, event tree analysis, sensitivity analysis, qualitative risk analysis, quantitative risk analysis, case studies on information systems, value analysis and integrated risk management. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for INSE 691 (Risk Analysis for Information and Systems Engineering) may not take this course for credit.

Description: Origins of systems engineering; modern engineering systems; structure of complex systems; systems life cycle; systems engineering management; system decomposition and architecture; systems with uncertain and imperfect information; structural and dynamics modelling; integration and evaluation: production, operation and support; systems engineering decision tools; special topics: systems of systems, sustainability, mass collaboration. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:

Description: This course introduces main design theories and methodologies for the conceptual and configuration design of mechanical/manufacturing systems. It includes the following topics: general design process; introduction to design theory and methodologies; user requirements analysis; structure of design problem; design concept and product configuration generation methods; evaluation of design concepts and product configuration; sources and resolution strategies of design conflicts; computer-assistance of all these tasks; and case studies of product design. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Introduction to integration and testing of complex systems; fundamentals of project planning; process analysis; workflow modelling; six sigma tools and methodologies for systems integration; formulation of systems operational assessment and concept; systems architecture, functions and capabilities composition and packaging into high-level system architecture; modelling and analysis methods for representing system functionality and capability; interface description and management; testability and interoperability testing; management issues pertaining to integrated product teams, vendors, suppliers, and subcontractors. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: ELEC 6851; COMP 6461 or equivalent.

Description: Design, provisioning and management of ad hoc wireless networks. Concepts, architectures and protocols related to the efficient design and high performance of ad hoc wireless networks. Medium access control schemes; mathematical analysis. Analysis of access protocols in multihop networks; derive the system capacity. Study of various control knobs for improving the network capacity; power control, physical carrier sense turning, rate control, interference mitigation, and channel diversity. Study emerging issues such as supporting quality of service in wireless networks; security issues in wireless networks, broadband wireless access; wireless mesh networks; their integration with wired networks; vehicular ad hoc networks and related protocols. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Fundamentals of game theory; equilibrium concepts; strategic games; extensive games; Bayesian games; game strategies in network security; game theory for trust and reputation; fundamentals of mechanism design; optimal mechanisms; efficient mechanisms; incentive compatibility; incentives and information security; revelation principle and trust; analysis tools; applications: security protocols, supply chain, trust and reputation, social networks. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: COMP 5511 or equivalent.

Description: This course is part development and part technology, and will cover the process of commercial video game development, and software design patterns used for game design. The course provides an in-depth understanding of how the game design process works. Students work with a game engine software framework to design and implement several kinds of games. Video game history. Basic Building blocks of a game. Elements of game design. Game Maker: objects, sprites, events. Space Shooter. Developing games with Games Factory. Real Time Strategy game development. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: COMP 6761 or equivalent.

Description: Application of 3D graphics and animation topics to non real-time rendered media. Current research topics in computer animation such as dynamic simulation of flexible and rigid objects, automatically-generated control systems, and evolution of behaviours. History of Animation. Animation Basics. Keyframe Animation. Path Animation. Non-Linear Animation. Modelling Concerns for Animation. Rigging for Forward and Inverse Kinematics. Morphing. Expressions. Particle Systems. Dynamics. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Introduction to cybercrimes: unauthorized access, mischief to data, possession of hacking tools, possession of child pornography; Legal aspects: Canadian judicial system, computer crime laws, charter of rights, common law, mutual legal assistance treaty, search warrants, production and assistance orders, international laws, upcoming legal changes; Investigation process: search planning, acquisition methods, environment recognition, evidence identification; Reporting process: investigation and analysis reports, notes taking; authority of seizure; forensic interviews; Computer crime trials: witness preparation, court sentencing, rebuttal witness, cross-examination, testimony, credibility attacks; in-depth case studies. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for INSE 691 (Cybercrime Investigations) may not take this course for credit.

Description: The course covers blockchain technology with an emphasis on its application to finance. Starting with the Bitcoin cryptocurrency, it covers the requisite cryptographic primitives (hash functions, digital signatures, commitments, accumulators, Merkle trees, proof of work) and explains the Bitcoin protocol (including transactions, blocks, network and software). It then focuses on programmable currency and contracts, explaining Bitcoin’s scripting feature and the Ethereum blockchain. It covers the Solidity programming language, highlighting specific features that were added for the blockchain context (and don’t exist in other object-oriented programming languages). Finally, the course covers blockchain use-cases in including financial technology and government use. Assignments will include deploying an actual contract to Ethereum’s testnet. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: INSE 6110 or equivalent.

Description: Cloud computing concepts, SOA and cloud, virtualization and cloud, cloud service delivery models, cloud storage models, cloud deployment scenarios, public/ private/ hybrid/ community cloud, cloud computing architectures, SaaS, PaaS, IaaS, agility, scalability and elasticity of cloud, cloud security, cloud privacy, homomorphic encryption, searching encrypted cloud data, secure data outsourcing, secure computation outsourcing, proof of data possession / retrievability, virtual machine security, trusted computing in clouds, cloud-centric regulatory compliance, business and security risk models, cloud user security, identity management in cloud, SAML, applications of secure cloud computing.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: any two of INSE 6110, INSE 6120, INSE 6130, or INSE 6140.

Description: Security and privacy legislations. New security threats and solution on personal computers, enterprise computers, personal information, confidential information, identity fraud, financial fraud, and social networking. Recent developments in trusted computing for critical cyber infrastructure, privacy-aware information sharing, cybercrime, and cyber forensics techniques. Cyber espionage, cyber terrorism, and cyber war. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Overview of electric grid operation, evolution to the smart grid, smart grid components, dynamic pricing, promotion of “green” resources, governmental regulation, network standards, consumer privacy, risks to the smart grid, physical security and protections against tampering for smart grid environments, device level security, authorization and access control, consumer privacy protection, cryptographic mechanisms for smart grid environments, secure key management, communication security in smart grid, privacy of user data for Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), security standards for smart grid, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), SCADA architecture, SCADA Security, SCADA monitoring, SCADA systems for smart grids, distributed control systems (DCS), communication infrastructure. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Hardware and software root of trust; establishing and attesting trust of software systems; Trusted Platform Module (TPM); CPU support for trusted computing, including existing technologies such as Intel Trusted Execution Technology (TXT), AMD Secure Virtual Machine (SVM), ARM TrustZone; secure crypto processors such as Hardware Security Modules (HSMs); bank HSM APIs and their weaknesses; attestation protocols; OS support for trusted computing; security tokens (e.g., second factor of authentication, smartcards, transaction verification code); trusted user interface; use cases: digital rights management (DRM), authentication, protected execution of security sensitive code, trusted kiosk computing, full disk encryption, malware exploiting trusted computing infrastructure; hardware and software attacks; privacy issues. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Topics include fundamentals of secure programming; string-related vulnerabilities and defence. Pointer-related vulnerabilities and defence; memory management-related vulnerabilities and defence. Integer-related security issues; formatted output-related security issues; concurrency-related security issues; security vulnerabilities and linking; security in sockets programming; security vulnerabilities and signals; file I/O security; best practices and coding standards; design principles for secure programming; model-based secure programming; static analysis for secure programming. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Topics of this course include embedded and real-time embedded systems; embedded systems security and trust; monitoring of embedded systems; security and protection objectives for hardware; adversaries, attacks; trusted integrated circuits (TIC); hardware assisted security and trust; process reliability and security; secure program execution on embedded processors; networks on chip; secure memory access; hardware trusted platforms; secure processors; efficient security processing; energy efficient security; cryptographic processors; physical one-way functions (POWF); PUF-based security; FSM model of computation; hiding information in FSM/IC piracy protection by active hardware metering; remote enabling and disabling of ICs; watermarking for intellectual property protection (IPP); physical and invasive attacks, side-channel attacks; zero knowledge proofs; FPGA security; FPGA fingerprinting and access; hardware trojan horses. Applications (automotive domain, internet of things, cyber-physical systems, SCADA, sensor networks). A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Topics of this course include identifying potential security threats and vulnerabilities, threat and risk assessment; security equipment and systems (access control and biometrics technology, surveillance systems, network infrastructure supporting security technology); physical security of information systems; maximizing the value of security systems; securing transported materials; emergency management and risk mitigation; critical infrastructure protection. Overview of the Canadian Operational Standard on Physical Security, Policy on Government Security and U.S. National Response Framework. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Federated learning is a privacy-preserving machine learning paradigm, which enables the collaborative training of machine learning models from decentralized datasets in users’ devices such as mobile phones, wearable devices and smart sensors without uploading their privacy-sensitive data to a central server or service provider. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of federated learning with case studies in healthcare, smart cities, Internet of Things, and blockchain technology. Topics include centralized versus decentralized learning systems, local model training and global model aggregation, federated averaging algorithms, federated learning protocols, differential privacy and secure multi-party-computation, homomorphic encryption, privacy-preserving protocols, adaptive aggregation and incentive mechanisms, data and model poisoning attacks. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course provides a comprehensive overview of cyber-physical systems (CPS), including characterization, evolution, basics and fundamental concepts. The application domains of CPS include manufacturing, healthcare, smart grid, transportation and smart cities. The course also covers modelling, control issues in CPS, machine-type communications, research trends for supporting CPS applications, data reliability challenge of CPS, localization in CPS, application of game theory to CPS, and ethical issues in CPS. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Subject matter will vary from term to term and from year to year.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students may reregister for these courses, providing that the course content has changed. Changes in content will be indicated by the title of the topic.

Description: Students must attend a set of seminars identified by the Concordia Institute for Information Systems Engineering and submit a comprehensive report on the topics presented in three of the seminars.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6311 or equivalent.

Description: The primary objective of this course is to present the methods used in the design and analysis of modern security protocols, introduction to existing cryptographic protocols. The most important security proprieties (such as authentication, secrecy, integrity, availability, atomicity, certified delivery and other properties), flaw taxonomy (such as freshness attacks, type attacks, parallel session attacks, implementation dependent attacks, binding attacks, encapsulation attacks and other forms of attack). Cryptographic protocol specification (general-purpose formal languages, logical languages, operational languages and security calculi). Cryptographic protocol analysis (security logics analysis, model-based and algebraic analysis, process algebra analysis, type based analysis). Limitations of formal methods and ad-hoc techniques, project will be offered in analyzing a number of published cryptographic protocols. The focus of this course will be on the design and the analysis of security protocols. A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6861 or equivalent.

Description: Telecommunications service engineering, or more simply service engineering, is the discipline that addresses the technologies and engineering process for the specification, implementation, testing, deployment, usage of value added services in telecommunication networks, value added services, or more simply services, can be defined as anything that goes beyond two party voice calls. They are either call related (e.g. call diversion, multiparty gaming, conducted conferences) or non-call related (e.g. customized stock quotes, web surfing from a cellular phone). Some services may combine call related and non-call related features (e.g. call centres). This course will cover the basics of service engineering (such as basic concepts, value added services, service life cycle, service engineering, intelligent networks, WAP/Imode/TINE-C). The basics of next generation networks (such as session initiation protocol (SIP), H.323, Megaco, H.248, 3GPP/3GPP2 architecture, softswitch). Signaling protocol-specific approaches (such as H.232 supplementary services, SIP CGI, SIP servlet API). Signaling protocol neutral approaches (such as CPL, JAIN JCC/JCAT, PARLAY; web services). Approaches at the research stage (such as context awareness; mobile code-based approaches). A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COEN 6861 or equivalent.

Description: Network management – basics (history and basic definitions, management frameworks, functional areas). The simple network management protocol framework (history, protocol architecture, functional architecture, information architecture, RMON, management by delegation, distributed management and JASMIN NIB, case studies). OSI systems management, TNM and other frameworks (OSI communication, information and functional models, TMN functional, physical and information architecture, case study, CORBA based management, web based management, DTMF, JMX). Interoperability issue and in-depth study of a specific functional area overview of known techniques (e.g. dual MIBs), alarm filtering techniques (e.g. artificial intelligence), alarm correlation techniques (e.g. artificial intelligence, coding theory). Approaches still a research level (mobile agent based network management, active network based network management, policy based artwork management, use of SML/web services). A project is required.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Students must complete a 29-credit thesis as part of their degree requirements. The thesis must represent the results of the student’s independent work after admission to the program. The proposed topic for the thesis, together with a brief statement outlining the proposed method of treatment, and the arrangement made for faculty supervision, must be approved by the GCS Graduate Studies Committee. For purposes of registration, this work will be designated as INSE 8901. The thesis will be evaluated by the student’s supervisor(s), and at least two examiners appointed by the GCS Graduate Studies Committee, one of whom may be external to the student’s department.

Component(s): Thesis Research

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