Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema Courses

Film and Moving Image Studies MA Courses

Description: This is a mandatory course in the Film and Moving Image Studies Program. Course materials examine the ways that moving image history, theory, criticism, and analysis have been and can be written, encompassing established ways of seeing, interpreting and understanding cinema and related media.

Notes:
  • Although these courses are not sequenced, it is strongly recommended that students enroll in this course prior to enrolling in FMST 602.
  • Students who have received credit for FMST 600 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Although these courses are not sequenced, it is strongly recommended that students enroll in FMST 601 prior to enrolling in this course.

Description: This is a mandatory course in the Film and Moving Image Studies MA Program. Students develop advanced research, writing and presentation skills. In addition to technical and practical matters, students develop productive and original research questions reflecting traditional and emergent approaches to cinema and related media.

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for FMST 600 may not take this course for credit.
Also listed as  FMST 805.

Description: This seminar explores the spectrum of Canadian cinema and video produced in English, and features screenings of historical and contemporary works within fiction, documentary and experimental areas, and in some instances, video and television as well. The culture, political and institutional contexts of production and reception are emphasized, with textural analysis at the core.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 605 may not take that same topic under FMST 805 for credit.

Also listed as FMST 810.

Description: The course explores Québécois cinema culture. Emphasis is placed on the cultural and political contexts of production and reception. Topics may include the structure of the film industry in Québec, the role of the NFB and other institutions, avenues of distribution and exhibition, also particular groups of films, such as cinema direct, or on specific time periods, or the work of specific filmmakers.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 610 may not take that same topic under FMST 810 for credit.

Also listed as  FMST 815.

Description: This course covers topics in Russian, German, French, Italian, British, Spanish and Eastern European Cinemas. Questions of national culture, patterns of film production, distribution and reception, and aesthetic histories are covered. The course incorporates future experimental and documentary films as well as readings in specific cultural histories.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 615 may not take that same topic under FMST 815 for credit.

Also listed as FMST 820.

Description: This course focuses on Asian, African and South American filmmaking, film cultures and film industries, and comparative studies of issues pertinent to more than one of these cultures.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 620 may not take that same topic under FMST 820 for credit.

Also listed as  FMST 825.

Description: This course explores specific problems and methods of film historiography, and examines the practices associated with one or more of these methods. Course topics emphasize various historiographic methods and theories, problems of methodology and analysis.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 625 may not take that same topic under FMST 825 for credit.

Also listed as  FMST 830.

Description: This course is devoted to close readings of key tests in film theory, examining their background, intellectual histories, and analyzing their significance. Topics may concentrate on historical developments in film theory, or they may address a given method or approach.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 630 may not take that same topic under FMST 830 for credit.
Also listed as FMST 835.

Description: This course examines the broader cultural and aesthetic histories relevant to film theory and practice. These theories are studied in depth, beyond the limits of film studies, in order to situate film history and theory within other interdisciplinary perspectives. Topics may include postmodernism, modernism, philosophical aesthetics, sexual representation, Frankfurt School theory, postcolonialism, Marxism, deconstruction, and psychoanalysis.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 635 may not take that same topic under FMST 835 for credit.
Also listed as  FMST 840.

Description: This course provides an opportunity to contextualize a range of historical and theoretical feminist positions, and women’s film practices. Sample course topics include pornography, experimental feminist praxis, gender and race, or constructions of gender in specific historical periods or countries.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 640 may not take that same topic under FMST 840 for credit.
Also listed as FMST 845.

Description: This course explores specific narrative film genres, such as the musical, the western, comedy, horror, melodrama and film noir. In each case, the history of the genre and its socio-historical dimensions is explored. Questions of genre transformation, popular mythology, cultural sources and parallel media, institutional analysis (studio practices) and spectatorship are addressed.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 645 may not take that same topic under FMST 845 for credit.
Also listed as  FMST 850.

Description: This course examines the history, aesthetics, theory and practice of experimental/avant-garde film and video, and may be organized around specific bodies of work, or theoretical issues such as the politics of representation, pure cinema, poetic structures, reflexivity, or documentary representation. Questions of medium specificity, modernism/postmodernism, performance art and theory, exhibition, distribution, canonization and criticism are addressed.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 650 may not take that same topic under FMST 850 for credit.
Also listed as  FMST 855.

Description: Documentary history, aesthetics and theory are addressed in this course. Questions of ideology, narrative and style in the context of specific groups of films are studied. Topics may relate to specific countries, histories, methods, institutions and cultural issues and methodological and theoretical problems arising from the concomitant evolution of television journalism, rapidly evolving technology, and changing patterns of exhibition and reception are examined.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 655 may not take that same topic under FMST 855 for credit.
Also listed as  FMST 860.

Description: This course examines the work of one or more specific directors from stylistic, aesthetic, cultural and historical perspectives. Directors that may be studied include Welles, Dreyer, Eisenstein, Hitchcock, Lang, Pasolini, Godard, Von Sternberg, Akermann and Arzmer, have been the foundation of extensive film studies scholarship.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 660 may not take that same topic under FMST 860 for credit.
Also listed as  FMST 865.

Description: This course covers special topics related to an instructor’s research project. Students study limited and more specialized aspects of film and moving image studies.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 665 may not take that same topic under FMST 865 for credit.

Component(s): Independent Study

Description: A student may receive credit for work at film institutions (e.g. festivals, archives), periodicals, educational or production establishments and for academic professional internships. Each internship must be approved in advance by the Program Director and the student must consult with an academic supervisor. The duties will be supervised by an individual within the sponsoring organization, in consultation with an academic adviser, to ensure that the student’s responsibilities are in keeping with aims of the MA program.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Notes:
  • The academic advisor will determine the credit value of the internship, which will be evaluated on the basis of the student’s written report. The report should demonstrate the student’s understanding of the organization’s social and cultural role as well as an analysis of the activities and functioning of the organization. This 3-credit practicum should involve at least 135 hours at the host institution.

Description: A student may receive credit for work at film institutions (e.g. festivals, archives), periodicals, educational or production establishments and for academic professional internships. Each internship must be approved in advance by the Program Director and the student must consult with an academic supervisor. The duties will be supervised by an individual within the sponsoring organization, in consultation with an academic adviser, to ensure that the student’s responsibilities are in keeping with aims of the MA program.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Notes:
  • The academic advisor will determine the credit value of the internship, which will be evaluated on the basis of the student’s written report. The report should demonstrate the student’s understanding of the organization’s social and cultural role as well as an analysis of the activities and functioning of the organization. This 3-credit practicum should involve at least 135 hours at the host institution.

Description: A student may receive credit for work at film institutions (e.g. festivals, archives), periodicals, educational or production establishments and for academic professional internships. Each internship must be approved in advance by the Program Director and the student must consult with an academic supervisor. The duties will be supervised by an individual within the sponsoring organization, in consultation with an academic adviser, to ensure that the student’s responsibilities are in keeping with aims of the MA program.

Component(s): Practicum/Internship/Work Term

Notes:
  • The academic advisor will determine the credit value of the internship, which will be evaluated on the basis of the student’s written report. The report should demonstrate the student’s understanding of the organization’s social and cultural role as well as an analysis of the activities and functioning of the organization. This 6-credit internship has the same requirements and provisions as the 3-credit internships, except that the student is expected to do twice the work (270 hours). This may occur in a concentrated period of time (one semester), or may be taken over two consecutive semesters.

Description: The examination committee will consist of three faculty members, and will be chaired by the Graduate Program Director, who will remain a neutral member of the committee. The GPD may appoint an alternate chair if he or she is a supervisor or reader of the thesis. Theses must be submitted to the department at least six weeks prior to the submission deadline given in the graduate calendar.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Film and Moving Image Studies PhD  Courses

Core and Cluster Courses

Core Courses

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Enrolment in Film and Moving Image Studies PhD is required. If prerequisites are not satisfied, written permission of the Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema Programs is required.

Description: Proseminar I is designed to give students a broad introduction to advanced film and moving image research by putting different periods, research methodologies, theories, and genres into dynamic relation. Written assignments are required as well as an oral presentation.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for FMST 800 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: FMST 806. If prerequisites are not satisfied, written permission of the Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema Programs is required.

Description: Proseminar II is designed to give students a broad introduction to advanced film and moving image research by putting different periods, research methodologies, theories,and genres into dynamic relation. Written assignments are required as well as an oral presentation.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for FMST 800 may not take this course for credit.

Cluster Courses (Topics Clusters)

The specific content of the seminars in each of the four topics clusters will be decided by the doctoral program joint committee on a yearly basis, based on course proposals made by accredited faculty.

Cluster A

Description: Advanced study and research in problems and issues related to film and moving image history and historiography. Topics for seminars in this cluster may include: Methods in Film Historiography; Methodological Aspects of Film-Archival Research; History of Film Technology; History of Film Institutions; History of Pre-Cinema and Early Cinema; History of Silent Cinema; History of Film Movements; History of Documentary Film; History of New Media.

Component(s): Seminar

Cluster B

Description: Advanced study and research in problems and issues of film aesthetics. Students examine the style associated with certain films, directors, genres, and national cinemas, or investigate film criticism and taste cultures. Topics for seminars in this cluster may include: Topics in Film Style and Form; Topics in Film Criticism; Topocs in Film and the Other Arts: Topics in Aesthetic Theory; Topics in Directors; Topics in Moving Image and New Media Art: New Media Aesthetics; Performance.

Component(s): Seminar

Cluster C

Description: Seminars in this cluster offer an in-depth investigation of a theory or a theoretical tradition in Film and Moving Image Studies. The course may focus on the work of a single theorist, or a particular approach or methodology. Topics for seminars in this cluster include: Interpretation and Hermeneutics; Reception Theory; Narrative Theory; Topics in Classical Film Theory; Topics in Contemporary Film Theory; Topics in Film and Philosophy; Psychoanalysis and Film; Genre Theory; Semiotics; Topics in Cognitive Theory; Textual Analysis.

Component(s): Seminar

Cluster D

Description: Seminars in this cluster investigate film and the moving image from social and cultural perspectives. Topics for seminars in this cluster may include: Cinema and Modernity; Postmodernity and Globalization; Film, New Media, and Visual Culture, Queer Theory; Feminist Theory; Post-colonial Theory; Topics in Social and Political Theory; Topics in Cultural Studies; Film in the Context of Television and Consumer Culture.

Component(s): Seminar

Elective Courses (Joint MA/PhD seminars)

Students take a maximum of six credits of elective coursework. Students are entitled to enrol in PhD seminars that are cross-listed with MA seminars, provided they do not repeat seminars taken at Concordia during their MA degree. (Doctoral students registered in these courses will be expected to perform at PhD level).


Note: The focus of any given topics course in a given year determines the cluster to which it belongs. For example, “Topics in Cinéma Québécois” may belong to Cluster A when the focus is on historiography or it may belong to Cluster B when the course centers on aesthetic issues in Quebec cinema.

Also listed as FMST 605.

Description: This seminar explores the spectrum of Canadian cinema and video produced in English, and features screenings of historical and contemporary works within fiction, documentary and experimental areas, and in some instances, video and television as well. The culture, political and institutional contexts of production and reception are emphasized, with textural analysis at the core.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 605 may not take that same topic under FMST 805 for credit.
Also listed as FMST 610.

Description: The course explores Québécois cinema culture. Emphasis is placed on the cultural and political contexts of production and reception. Topics may include the structure of the film industry in Québec, the role of the NFB and other institutions, avenues of distribution and exhibition, also particular groups of films, such as cinema direct, or on specific time periods, or the work of specific filmmakers.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 610 may not take that same topic under FMST 810 for credit.
Also listed as FMST 615.

Description: This course covers topics in Russian, German, French, Italian, British, Spanish and Eastern European Cinemas. Questions of national culture, patterns of film production, distribution and reception, and aesthetic histories are covered. The course incorporates future experimental and documentary films as well as readings in specific cultural histories.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 615 may not take that same topic under FMST 815 for credit.
Also listed as FMST 620.

Description: This course focuses on Asian, African and South American filmmaking, film cultures and film industries, and comparative studies of issues pertinent to more than one of these cultures.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 620 may not take that same topic under FMST 820 for credit.
Also listed as FMST 625.

Description: This course explores specific problems and methods of film historiography, and examines the practices associated with one or more of these methods. Course topics emphasize various historiographic methods and theories, problems of methodology and analysis.

Component(s): Lecture; Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 625 may not take that same topic under FMST 825 for credit.
Also listed as FMST 630.

Description: This course is devoted to close readings of key tests in film theory, examining their background, intellectual histories, and analyzing their significance. Topics may concentrate on historical developments in film theory, or they may address a given method or approach.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 630 may not take that same topic under FMST 830 for credit.
Also listed as FMST 635.

Description: This course examines the broader cultural and aesthetic histories relevant to film theory and practice. These theories are studied in depth, beyond the limits of film studies, in order to situate film history and theory within other interdisciplinary perspectives. Topics may include postmodernism, modernism, philosophical aesthetics, sexual representation, Frankfurt School theory, postcolonialism, Marxism, deconstruction, and psychoanalysis.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 635 may not take that same topic under FMST 835 for credit.
Also listed as FMST 640.

Description: This course provides an opportunity to contextualize a range of historical and theoretical feminist positions, and women’s film practices. Sample course topics include pornography, experimental feminist praxis, gender and race, or constructions of gender in specific historical periods or countries.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 640 may not take that same topic under FMST 840 for credit.

Also listed as FMST 645.

Description: This course explores specific narrative film genres, such as the musical, the western, comedy, horror, melodrama and film noir. In each case, the history of the genre and its socio-historical dimensions is explored. Questions of genre transformation, popular mythology, cultural sources and parallel media, institutional analysis (studio practices) and spectatorship are addressed.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 645 may not take that same topic under FMST 845 for credit.
Also listed as FMST 650.

Description: This course examines the history, aesthetics, theory and practice of experimental/avant-garde film and video, and may be organized around specific bodies of work, or theoretical issues such as the politics of representation, pure cinema, poetic structures, reflexivity, or documentary representation. Questions of medium specificity, modernism/postmodernism, performance art and theory, exhibition, distribution, canonization and criticism are addressed.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 650 may not take that same topic under FMST 850 for credit.

Also listed as FMST 655.

Description: Documentary history, aesthetics and theory are addressed in this course. Questions of ideology, narrative and style in the context of specific groups of films are studied. Topics may relate to specific countries, histories, methods, institutions and cultural issues and methodological and theoretical problems arising from the concomitant evolution of television journalism, rapidly evolving technology, and changing patterns of exhibition and reception are examined.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 655 may not take that same topic under FMST 855 for credit.

Also listed as FMST 650.

Description: This course examines the work of one or more specific directors from stylistic, aesthetic, cultural and historical perspectives. Directors that may be studied include Welles, Dreyer, Eisenstein, Hitchcock, Lang, Pasolini, Godard, Von Sternberg, Akermann and Arzmer, have been the foundation of extensive film studies scholarship.

Component(s): Seminar

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 660 may not take that same topic under FMST 860 for credit.

Also listed as FMST 665.

Description: This course covers special topics related to an instructor’s research project. Students study limited and more specialized aspects of film and moving image studies.

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for a topic in FMST 665 may not take that same topic under FMST 865 for credit.

Thesis, Research and Comprehensive Examinations

Description: The thesis proposal consists of a 25-30 page document outlining the object of study of the thesis, its objectives, the research hypothesis, and the methodology that will be used or developed. A detailed bibliography must accompany the document as well as a preliminary table of contents. The thesis proposal must be defended orally before a jury consisting of the student’s supervisor and two faculty members (the student’s dissertation committee), which ideally is the same as his/her examination committee. The proposal is submitted by the student to then supervisor within three months of successful completion of the comprehensive exam, and approved by the supervisor no later than April of the student’s second year in the program. Upon approval of the proposal, an oral defense takes place no later than the following May.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Description: Upon completion of at least 12 credits of coursework, the student begins preparing the reading list and filmography (where appropriate) for the comprehensive examination, which pertains to the student’s major subfield of research. A reading list of approximately 50 books and essays along with an appropriate and relevant filmography will be prepared by the student with the assistance of his/her supervisor. The reading list and essay are evaluated by an examination committee comprising three faculty members, including the student’s supervisor. The reading list and filmography are first approved by the supervisor and then by the other members of the examination committee, who may suggest further changes. Three to four months after the final approval of the reading list, having indicated his/her readiness to the supervisor, the student receives up to four examination questions from the supervisor, based on the reading list. The student has two weeks to produce an essay answering two of the questions. This exam should be completed by the student no later than December of his/her second year in the program (fourth term).

Component(s): Thesis Research

Description: This course functions as a written case study that demonstrates the candidate’s capacity to perform critical analysis of research material and address research questions as outlined in the thesis proposal. The essay is normally 6000 to 9000 words, following the professional criteria for publication. It is followed by an oral defense before the examination subcommittee. The specialization essay is submitted by the student to the supervisor and his/her examination committee, and is approved for submission no later than December of his/her third year in the program (seventh term). The oral defense is then scheduled for the following January. Upon successful completion of the specialization examination essay (and contingent on the completion of the required 15 course credits), the student is admitted to candidacy.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Description: A major portion of the doctoral program is the planning and execution of innovative and original research under the direction of a supervisor. The student’s research will be presented in a written thesis and defended orally in conformity with the regulations outlined in Concordia University’s Graduate Calendar. The candidate will submit his/her doctoral thesis to an examining committee consisting of at least five faculty members: the candidate’s supervisor, two faculty members from the Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema, a faculty member from another department within Concordia (external-to-program examiner), and an external-to-University faculty member. The doctoral thesis defence will be an oral examination conducted by a chair who shall be the Dean of Graduate Studies or a delegate.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Other Film and Moving Image Studies PhD Elective Courses

Description: Independent Study courses offer students opportunities to research and write about particular topics in film studies that are not covered in the courses offered in a given year. Students must propose a topic to a full-time faculty member, under whose supervision they complete the course.

Component(s): Independent Study

Description: Film Studies faculty in the School of Cinema may organize seminars on a current research project.

Component(s): Seminar

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