Supply Chain Management (MSCM) Seminars

Description: This seminar emphasizes the theoretical and practical aspects of advanced optimization modelling techniques in supply chain planning. Among the topics covered are network optimization, non-linear programming, stochastic programming, Markov processes and application of duality in developing decomposition-based solution approaches for large linear and integer models. Use of commercial modelling platform and optimization software are an integral part of this seminar.

Component(s): Seminar

Description: This seminar covers the practices, techniques and regulations associated with sourcing and movement of materials in the global supply chains. Among the topics covered on sourcing are impact of globalization on sourcing, supplier evaluation and selection, supplier performance management, purchasing, electronic procurement, negotiations, contract law, supplier relationship management. Issues in global logistics are discussed in the second half of the seminar. Among the topics covered are distribution channels, warehousing, transportation management, reverse logistics, green logistics and sustainability, and cross-border issues in logistics. The coverage is supplemented by case studies and research articles.

Component(s): Seminar

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MSCM 681 or equivalent.

Description: This seminar focuses on managerial and modelling issues in supply chain design and coordination along the supply chain. Models in facility location, distribution networks and global supply chain networks are studied. The strategic aspects of supply chain design are discussed in terms of competitive drivers. The second part of the seminar deals with coordination issues. Among the concepts and models covered in this respect are supply chain contracts, collaborative planning, forecasting and replenishment, bullwhip effect, postponement, and vendor managed inventory. Articles, case studies, optimization software and simulation game are used as part of seminar delivery.

Component(s): Seminar

Description: The seminar presents advanced forecasting tools that assist market analysis, revenue management tools that optimize operational performance and approaches in building flexibilities to enhance manufacturing and organizational capabilities. Among the topics covered are advanced forecasting models, judgmental forecasting and adjustment, customer relationship management, consumer choice models, dynamic pricing, capacity control, network revenue management, manufacturing and organizational flexibilities. The seminar content is delivered via a combination of lectures, case analyses and research articles.

Component(s): Seminar

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MSCM 681 or equivalent.

Description: Strategies for managing the various risks along the supply chain are studied. Quantitative and qualitative approaches used in analyzing such risks and scenarios are covered. The seminar discusses risk identification and management, trade-offs in risk management, strategies for robustness, scenario planning, financial risks and disruption planning. The approaches used for modelling and analyzing the supply chain risks are presented through lectures, case analyses and research articles.

Component(s): Seminar

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must have completed at least nine credits of MSCM seminars prior to enrolling.

Description: Supervised (co-supervised) by a faculty member(s), the applied research project is carried out individually or by a group of two students, depending on the overall requirements and the extent of the project to be conducted. The project involves working on a real-life supply chain management problem provided by a company. Once the problem is defined, the students prepare an overall project management plan to tackle the problem within a given time limit. The various stages of the project involve, among others: literature review, defining data and information requirements for problem analysis, gathering data, designing the appropriate model, conducting experimental design runs and sensitivity analyses, and presenting the solution(s) with an implementation plan. The project outcome is expected to have both academic and business merit. For projects done in groups of two students, there is a significant individual evaluation component in assessing the work done by each student.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Notes:
  • Only available to students admitted before September 2021.

Description: The MSc thesis is intended to provide candidates with an opportunity to carry out an in-depth investigation in a particular area of interest and to make a contribution to knowledge in the area. It is expected that the thesis will include a comprehensive and critical synthesis of the relevant literature and will also embody either a theoretical contribution to knowledge, a rigorous empirical investigation or both. A Thesis Committee consists of a faculty member from the department as supervisor and two other faculty members. An Examining Committee consists of the Thesis Committee and a Thesis Examination Chair appointed by the Associate Dean, Research and Research Programs in accordance with the thesis regulations specified in the relevant section of this calendar.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must have completed 6 credits in their program prior to enrolling.

Description: This seminar provides a detailed overview of the field of supply chain sustainability. It focuses on the role of managerial decision-making in creating sustainable supply chains. This seminar contains the analysis of the environmental and stakeholder management tools used by supply chain managers. It includes an examination of supply chain strategies that can be used to address real-world sustainability issues. The seminar content is presented through lectures, class discussions, case analyses and research articles.

Component(s): Seminar

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