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Section 61.35 John Molson School of Business Courses

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: BTM 200.

Description: This course focuses on the principles and techniques of clear, concise, and effective, written and oral communication, especially as they apply to business. The formal, grammatical, and stylistic elements of written and oral business communication are emphasized. In addition, students are instructed in and experience the use of audiovisual means of communication.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • It is recommended that part‑time students complete this course, along with COMM 210, as early in their program as possible.

  • Students who have received credit for COMM 212 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously or concurrently: COMM 205; ECON 201 or ECON 203 or equivalent.

Description: This course presents a broad survey of the world of business and aims to incite students to develop a critical perspective on business literature. Students explore foundational business theories, by studying business articles and books, and evaluating the central ideas for scope, relevance, and managerial utility. The course also fosters students’ inclination to keep well informed about contemporary issues in organizations and business. Basic group work techniques and basic project management skills guide the students to complete group assignments.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • It is recommended that part‑time students complete this course, along with COMM 205 as early in their program as possible.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: MATH 208 or equivalent; MATH 209 or equivalent. The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: BTM 200 or INTE 290 or COMP 248.

Description: This course introduces the fundamentals of statistics as applied to the various areas of business and administration. Topics covered include techniques of descriptive statistics, basic theory of probability and probability distributions, estimation and hypotheses testing, chi‑square tests in contingency table analysis and for goodness‑of‑fit, and linear regression and correlation.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: COMM 210.

Description: This course examines the theory and practice involved in measuring, reporting, and analyzing an organization’s financial information. Concepts underlying financial statements are discussed, with an emphasis on generally accepted accounting principles. Disclosures/requirements concerning financial statements as well as information needs of decision-makers are introduced.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: COMM 210; COMM 215; ECON 201 or equivalent. The following courses must be completed previously or concurrently: ECON 203 or equivalent.

Description: This course provides a general perspective on the history, operation and relationships between Canadian and international product, labour and financial markets. Specifically, students are introduced to issues of fundamental importance to today’s managers and entrepreneurs such as changes in structure and competitiveness in these markets in response to government policies, the determination and behaviour of interest rates, inflation, market integration, and the role and function of financial intermediation. It further provides students with the knowledge of the role and impact of regulation and other government interventions in these markets.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: COMM 205; COMM 210.

Description: This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to study individual behaviour in formal organizations. Through theoretical case and experiential approaches, the focus of instruction progressively moves through individual, group and organizational levels of analysis. Topics in the course include perception, learning, personality, motivation, leadership, group behaviour, and organizational goals and structure.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously or concurrently: COMM 205; COMM 210.

Description: This survey course introduces students to the key concepts in marketing. Topics covered include marketing strategy, buyer behaviour, and the impact of technology on the discipline. The course also explores the important role that marketing plays in advancing society.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is equivalent to COMM 224. Students who have received credit for COMM 224 may not take this course for credit


  • Students who have received credit for MARK 201 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: COMM 205; COMM 210; COMM 215.

Description: This course is an introduction to contemporary operational issues and techniques in the manufacturing and service sectors. Among the topics covered are operations strategy, forecasting, materials’ management, total quality management, time-based competition, and minimal manufacturing. Mathematical modelling in resource allocation is also introduced. Cases and computer-aided quantitative tools for decision-making are used throughout the course with an emphasis on the interactions between production/operations management and other business disciplines.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: COMM 210.

Description: The objective of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the role of information technology in business organizations. Students learn how information technologies can be used to create business value, solve business problems, accomplish corporate goals and achieve and maintain a competitive advantage.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for COMM 301 may not take this course for credit.


Description: This course enables students to focus on a specific topic in business that is of interest to all students.

Component(s): Seminar

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COMM 217.

Description: This course covers the development of accounting information to assist management in carrying out its functions effectively and efficiently. Concepts and techniques for planning, performance evaluation, control, and decision‑making are introduced. New developments are addressed with a focus on contemporary business issues and real-world applicability of management accounting concepts and techniques.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COMM 217. The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: COMM 220.

Description: This course provides a general understanding of the fundamental concepts of finance theory as they apply to the firm’s long‑run and short‑run financing, and investment decisions. Building on the objective of firm value maximization, students become familiar with the conceptual issues underlying risk and return relationships and their measurements, as well as the valuation of financial securities. They also learn the concept of cost of capital, its measurement, and the techniques of capital budgeting as practised by today’s managers. Students are introduced to the basic issues surrounding the firm’s short‑term and long‑term funding decisions and its ability to pay dividends.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: COMM 308.

Description: This course introduces students to important legal and ethical issues that they may encounter within a business organization. Through the study of laws, ethical principles and court judgments, students develop an understanding of legal and ethical issues, as well as the skills necessary to assist them in making sound legal and ethical decisions.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: COMM 222; COMM 305; COMM 308; COMM 223 or COMM 224.

Description: This course introduces students to entrepreneurship. Students analyze and integrate entrepreneurship concepts into business development cases. They research, prepare, and present a comprehensive business plan that may involve commercial, technological and social innovations delivered through new projects by either new business ventures or existing firms. Since the business plan integrates aspects of accountancy, marketing, financing, human resources management, and operations management, students benefit from knowledge of entrepreneurship, regardless of their career goals. Project activities require teamwork, leadership and communication skills.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete 45 business credits prior to enrolling, including the following courses: COMM 225; and COMM 226 or COMM 301. The following courses must be completed previously or concurrently: COMM 315 and COMM 320.

Description: This capstone course requires graduating students to demonstrate their ability to integrate the knowledge and skills they have acquired during their program. This course introduces the major models and theories in strategic management. Emphasis is on integrating concepts and methods for systematically assessing the external environment and internal company conditions that influence firm performance. Lecture topics and case studies are selected to portray the nature of the strategic process and the dynamics of competition in a variety of contexts. Additionally, the connection between organizational strategy and the physical environment is examined.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for COMM 310 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: To be determined each academic year.

Description: This course enables students, on an individual basis, to further focus on a specialized topic within their discipline.

Component(s): Lecture

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