Philosophy Courses

Description: In this course, students are introduced to philosophical problems such as: What is the nature of reality? How does one know what is real, and how is it distinct from misleading appearances or illusion? What is knowledge? Does knowledge require certainty? How is knowledge distinct from belief? Are people free? That is to say, do they choose their actions or are their actions determined by causes beyond their control? If people are not free, then how can they be held responsible for their actions? Can God’s existence be proven? How is the mind related to the body, if at all? What is it to be a morally good person?

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course is an introduction to argumentation and reasoning. It focuses on the kinds of arguments one is likely to encounter in academic work, in the media, and in philosophical, social, and political debate. The course aims to improve students’ ability to advance arguments persuasively and their ability to respond critically to the arguments of others. Students will find the skills they gain in this course useful in virtually every area of study.

Component(s): Online

Description: This course presents the modern symbolic systems of sentential and predicate logic. Students transcribe English sentences into a logical form, analyze the concepts of logical truth, consistency, and validity, as well as learn to construct derivations in each system.

Component(s): Lecture; Conference

Notes:
  • This course may not be taken for credit by students who have taken PHIL 212.

Description: This course provides an introduction to the main problems in the philosophy of language, concerned with the analysis of the concepts of meaning, reference, truth, necessity.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course provides an introduction to the main problems in the philosophy of science. These include the structure of scientific theories, various models of scientific method and explanation, and the existence of unobservables.

Component(s): Lecture; Conference

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for INTE 250 or PHIL 228 may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course examines philosophical problems about mind, and competing solutions. Topics may include: How does the mind relate to the brain or body? Could computers think? How can one know what other minds are thinking? What is the nature of conscious experience? Which animals are conscious? What determines what one’s thoughts are about?

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Philosophical discussions of ethics have both practical significance (What should one do?) and theoretical interest (What does imean to say, “That’s the right thing to do”?). In this course, students are introduced to some representative approaches to ethical thought and action. General questions about the nature of ethical reasoning are also considered. For example: Are there objective ethical truths or are ethical judgments merely relative to social norms? An effort is made to incorporate those ethical issues which are of specific importance to contemporary society.

Component(s): Lecture; Conference

Description:

This course focuses on ethical theory and its application to contemporary issues. The course covers central ethical theories such as virtue ethics (Aristotle), deontology (Kant), and utilitarianism (Mill). It applies these theories to contemporary moral issues such as humans’ relation to the environment and nonhuman animals, abortion, consumerism, the use of recreational drugs, the rationing of health-care resources, and national and international distributive justice.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 298 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course is primarily concerned with contemporary biomedical debates, many of which are of current social and political significance: euthanasia and physician‑assisted suicide, patients’ rights, animal experimentation, organ donation and transplantation, palliative care, abortion, genetic engineering, and new reproductive technologies.

Component(s): Online

Description: This course examines recent developments in ethical theories as they are applied to questions of environmental practices. Topics discussed may include the moral significance of nonhuman nature, duties to respond to climate change, economics and sustainable environmental protection, and environmental justice.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 298 or PHIL 398 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course investigates basic philosophical questions regarding human rights, such as their status between morality and law, their scope and the problem of relativism, the concept of human dignity, their relation to democracy, whether national or cosmopolitan, and the debate over the justifiability and feasibility of socio‑economic rights as human rights.

Component(s): Lecture; Conference

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 298 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course is a study of ancient Greek philosophy from its beginnings to Plato.

Component(s): Lecture; Conference

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: PHIL 260. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course is an introduction to Aristotle and the main lines of thought in Hellenistic philosophy, including Stoicism, Epicureanism and Scepticism.

Component(s): Lecture; Conference

Description: An introduction to the basic concepts and problems in epistemology, including belief, knowledge, scepticism, perception, and intentionality.

Component(s): Lecture; Conference

Description: This course is an introduction to metaphysics and the attempt to understand a mind‑independent reality. This involves distinguishing those aspects of reality that are dependent on the mind from those aspects that are independent of the mind. For example, are colours mind‑independent properties? Are there universal values and if so, are they mind‑independent? Is there a God, and if so, what must that God be like?

Component(s): Lecture; Conference

Description: This course explores a long philosophical tradition concerned with various issues associated with the idea of God, such as the various proofs for God’s existence, and questions such as: How does the existence of evil affect one’s views about God and the nature of God? What is the status of miracles? What are the varieties of religious experience, what is the nature of religious faith? How is one to understand religious language?

Component(s): Online

Description: This course focuses on key developments in modern and postmodern philosophy and their cultural influences. The course provides an introduction to philosophers (such as Kant, Nietzsche, and Foucault) and philosophical movements (such as empiricism, existentialism, and post‑structuralism) of the modern era. It also introduces students to the tremendous influence that philosophical theory has had on the arts, on social and political movements, and on virtually every field of study in the humanities and social sciences.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course introduces the philosophical traditions of the ancient period of Chinese history of philosophy, namely the Pre‑Qin period (before 202 BCE).

Component(s): Lecture

Description: An introduction to philosophy in classical and modern Islamic contexts. Authors may include al‑Fārābī, ibn Sīnā, ibn Tufayl, al‑Ghazālī, and ibn Rushd (classical); Muhammad Iqbal, Rokeya Sakhawat Hosein, Amina Wadud, Kecia Ali, and Abdol Karim Soroush (modern). Topics may include cosmology, the nature of God, causation, skepticism and certainty, authority and democracy, gender and sexuality, and environmental ethics.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course explores philosophical traditions or problems from a diversity of cultures and historical periods from around the world.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: PHIL 214.

Description: This course is intended for students who are interested in extending their knowledge of logic beyond what is taught in an introductory course. Topics may include metatheory, computability, alternative logics or modal logics.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for PHIL 314 or 315 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: PHIL 210 or PHIL 214. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course introduces approaches to inductive and abductive logic, such as probabilistic approaches. Topics may include classic and new problems for everyday and scientific induction, causal reasoning, the nature of evidence, and how to interpret probabilities.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who received credit for PHIL 218 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed three credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course examines a variety of philosophical issues in biology. Topics covered may include: fitness, function, units of selection, the nature of species, reductionism, biological explanation of human behaviour and the ethical and epistemological consequences of evolutionary theory.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed three credits in Philosophy or 12 credits in social science prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course offers a philosophical examination of the structure and methodology of the social sciences.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: PHIL 226. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course philosophically investigates the psychology of mind and cognition. Example questions: Which model of the mind’s architecture is best? Could all of psychology eventually be reduced to physics? How do sensory‑motor systems and the environment shape cognition? How does one ascribe beliefs and desires to others? How well does one know one’s own beliefs?

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed three credits in Philosophy, or Computer Science, or Psychology, or Biology prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course explores human, animal, and artificial minds by combining philosophy, artificial intelligence, and neurobiology. Topics may include: What distinguishes human minds from those of non‑human animals? Could robots endowed with human‑like sensory systems exhibit mental traits? How do evolution and experience combine to explain the origin of cognition?

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed three credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course provides an in‑depth study of the nature of justification in science, theories of scientific explanation, the rationality of theory change, and debates concerning realism and antirealism.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: PHIL 232 or PHIL 233 or PHIL 235 or PHIL 236 or PHIL 241. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course provides an examination of contemporary ethical theories such as deontology, utilitarianism, virtue theory, feminist ethics, and narrative ethics.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 398 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed three credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course presents a comparative approach to philosophical ideas in literature, which may involve authors from different historical time frames, different world views, or different perspectives of a single author.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed three credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: A survey of aesthetic theories in philosophy, with particular attention to major developments in the modern and contemporary periods.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed three credits in Philosophy or Political Science prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course provides analyses of important political and philosophical concepts such as globalization, nationalism, power, multiculturalism, tolerance, liberty, equality, community, economic justice, and democracy.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course provides a philosophical study of natural law theory, legal positivism, and legal realism. The associated issues of legal moralism, legal justice, legal obligation and its limits, and legal reasoning are addressed and applied to cases.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course offers a philosophical study of the nature, sources, and functions of rights and duties. Attention is given to the particular rights associated with contract and property, and their abuse, to duties arising by law alone, to excuses and justifications for failure to fulfill duties, and to enforcement, punishment, and compromise.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed three credits in History or Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: An analysis of the nature of historical knowledge and explanation is followed by a study of classical and contemporary attempts to elucidate the meaning of history. Authors may include Augustine, Vico, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Spengler, Popper, Toynbee, Arendt.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course examines philosophical principles underlying educational theories and problems arising from the practical implementation of those theories.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy including PHIL 260 and PHIL 261 prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course is a study of central metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical themes in the work of authors such as Descartes, Hobbes, Cavendish, Spinoza, Conway, Malebranche, Locke, and Leibniz.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy including PHIL 260 and PHIL 261 to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course is a study of central metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical themes in the work of authors such as Locke, Leibniz, Astell, Masham, Wolff, Berkeley, du Châtelet, Hume, Reid, and Kant.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: PHIL 260 or PHIL 261. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course is an introduction to central themes in logic, physics, metaphysics, and moral and political philosophy from the fourth to the 14th century. Authors examined may include Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, ibn Sīnā, ibn Rushd, Thomas Aquinas, Moses ben Maimon, Duns Scotus, and William of Occam.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for PHIL 363 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed three credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course presents an intermediate study of major contemporary issues in the theory of knowledge, such as scepticism, nonempirical knowledge, contextualism, virtue epistemology, experimental epistemology, and debates between internalists and externalists concerning justification and knowledge.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed three credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course presents an intermediate study of major contemporary issues in metaphysics, such as realism vs. anti‑realism concerning the external world; mental causation, personhood and theories of human nature; universals, essences and natural kinds.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: PHIL 232 or PHIL 263. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course provides an introduction to some of the central issues in contemporary feminist philosophy. The key arguments in feminist epistemology, feminist ethics, and sex and gender studies are discussed from a variety of perspectives.

Component(s): Lecture

Description:

This course introduces philosophical approaches to concepts of race and racism. The course may explore metaphysical, epistemological, moral, social, political, scientific, or historical topics concerning race.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed six credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course examines Kant and some of the main currents of post‑Kantian philosophy, possibly including Hegel and post‑Hegelians, the romantic reaction, positivism, and pragmatism.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed six credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course examines 20th‑century French and German philosophy. Philosophers examined may include Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau‑Ponty, Foucault, Derrida, and Habermas.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed six credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course provides an analysis of some classical American pragmatists, such as Peirce, Dewey, James and C.I. Lewis, together with exponents of contemporary neopragmatism, such as Putnam, Rorty, and Quine.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course introduces the philosophical traditions of Chinese philosophy from 202 BCE to the 19th century. It examines the development of Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism and discusses topics in ethics, political philosophy, metaphysics, and epistemology.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course provides a critical analysis of the ideas of Marx and their modern development.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course acquaints the student with the fundamentals of the existentialist movement as a philosophical perspective. Philosophers considered may include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau‑Ponty, Jaspers, Marcel, and Berdyaev.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: This course examines epistemological and ethical implications of digital technologies (e.g. surveillance, artificial intelligence, and big data) in areas such as privacy, power relations, and the generation and sharing of knowledge.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 398 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: PHIL 214. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course presents the fundamentals of an advanced topic in logic.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course is an advanced study of a central problem in recent philosophy of language.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course explores advanced topics in the philosophy of science, such as theory change and justification, realism and anti‑realism, or reductionism; or specific issues in philosophy of physics or biology, such as evolution and development.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: PHIL 226 or PHIL 325 or PHIL 327. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This interdisciplinary course combines the philosophical study of mind with current research in psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, and computer science.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: PHIL 232 or PHIL 330. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course offers a study of one or more of the following ethical theories: deontology, utilitarianism, virtue theory, feminist ethics, care ethics, narrative ethics, contractualism, and discourse ethics, with a focus on ethical reasoning and motivation.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: PHIL 241 or PHIL 342. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course uses selected historical or contemporary writings in political philosophy to treat topics such as those of power, freedom, equality, distributive justice, law, and the boundaries of the political. Specific topics for this course are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Component(s): Lecture

(also listed as BIOL 421)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course helps students critically engage biology’s philosophical foundations. Topics typically include the nature of scientific reasoning, testing, and evidence in biology; how best to discover, define, and apply biological concepts; and how to structure the aims of biology to fit our diverse and changing societies.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for BIOL 421 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy including PHIL 263 or PHIL 265 or PHIL 364 or PHIL 365 prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course presents an intensive study of major contemporary issues in the theory of knowledge.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy including PHIL 263 or PHIL 265 or PHIL 364 or PHIL 365 prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course presents an intensive study of major contemporary issues in metaphysics.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: PHIL 371. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: An examination of recent issues in one of feminist ethics, epistemology or metaphysics. Subject will vary from year to year.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course studies themes or topics in recent research in phenomenology, such as nature, life, place, body, mind, illness, and disability.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy including PHIL 374 or PHIL 377 prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course focuses on a selected theme or topic within or via the texts of the tradition of continental philosophy. Example topics include language, the world, animality, social or environmental justice, the political, violence, and memory.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy including PHIL 374 or PHIL 377. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course examines recent research on major figures, or relations between major authors, in continental philosophy

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course addresses work by contemporary analytic philosophers on a chosen topic.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a PHIL 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy including PHIL 260 and PHIL 261 prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: Selected themes in the major dialogues of Plato are analyzed in depth.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy including PHIL 260 and PHIL 261 prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: Selected passages from the major works of Aristotle are analyzed in depth.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: PHIL 260 and PHIL 261.

Description:

An in-depth study of principal figures or important topics in ancient Greek or Roman philosophy.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course presents an intensive study of selected topics in the history of philosophy.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course presents an intensive study of selected topics in world philosophy.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course is an intensive study of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason and related works.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course is an analysis of selected themes from Hegel’s works.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course investigates selected philosophical problems and methodologies in the late‑19th‑ and early‑20th‑century traditions that developed into analytic philosophy.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course focuses on figures in 20th‑century analytic philosophy and/or the topics that attracted their attention.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course examines classic themes, texts and methodological issues in phenomenology, typically focusing on the work of figures such as Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau‑Ponty.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy including PHIL 374 or PHIL 377. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course investigates selected philosophical problems and methodologies as they arose in the late‑19th‑ and early‑20th‑century traditions that came to be called continental philosophy.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 30 credits in Philosophy and be enrolled in Honours Philosophy. Permission of the Department is required.

Description: With permission of the Department, an honours student may arrange a tutorial program with a faculty member culminating in a research project not exceeding 40 pages.

Component(s): Research

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Permission of the Department is required.

Description: This is an opportunity to carry out a personal project under the supervision of a faculty member. An intensive reading program is undertaken in the student’s area of special interest. Tutorials may be arranged with any faculty member, and the student must make these arrangements and obtain written permission in advance of registration.

Component(s): Tutorial

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for PHIL 497 may take this tutorial for credit provided the subject matter is different.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Permission of the Department is required.

Description:

This is an opportunity to carry out a personal project under the supervision of a faculty member. An intensive reading program is undertaken in the student’s area of special interest. Tutorials may be arranged with any faculty member, and the student must make these arrangements and obtain written permission in advance of registration.

Component(s): Tutorial

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for PHIL 496 may take this tutorial for credit provided the subject matter is different.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 12 credits in Philosophy prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

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