BA Specialization in Communication Studies

Program Requirements

Specialization in Communication Studies (60 credits)

18

credits:

COMS 205 Effective Communication Skills (3.00)
COMS 220 History of Communication and Media (3.00)
COMS 240 Communication Theory (3.00)
COMS 274 Communication Media: Intermedia I (3.00)
COMS 276 Communication Media: Sound I (3.00)
COMS 284 Communication Media: Moving Images I (3.00)

6

credits chosen from:

COMS 305 Media Criticism (3.00)
COMS 310 Media Genres (3.00)
COMS 352 Media Policy in Canada (3.00)
COMS 357 Media and Critical Theory (3.00)
COMS 367 Media and Cultural Context (3.00)
COMS 368 Media and Gender (3.00)
COMS 369 Visual Communication and Culture (3.00)
COMS 372 Theories of Public Discourse (3.00)
COMS 373 Topics in Media and Cultural History (3.00)

33credits chosen as follows:
a minimum of six credits and a maximum of 18 credits chosen from the list of Practicum Courses: Communication Studies
a minimum of 15 credits and a maximum of 27 credits chosen from the list of Studies Courses: Communication Studies at the 300 or 400 level, with at least nine credits at the 400 level
3credits chosen from the lists of Studies Courses: Communication Studies or Practicum Courses: Communication Studies at the 400 level
Note: Students may not take more than one course from the list of Practicum Courses: Communication Studies in any one term at the 300 or 400 level

Notes

  • Elective credits are understood as courses taken in other departments or Faculties of the University. Credits in Communication Studies or in the Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema may not be used in lieu of electives.
  • 200‑level courses are normally taken in first year, 300‑level courses in second year, 400‑level courses in third year.
  • Students are required to complete the appropriate entrance profile for entry into the program (see Section 31.002 Programs and Admission Requirements – Programs and Admission Requirements – Profiles).
  • Students are responsible for satisfying their particular degree requirements.

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