Interdisciplinary Fine Arts Courses

Fine Arts Foundational Year Course

The following course is required for all Bachelor of/Baccalaureate in Fine Arts students. It is strongly recommended that students take this course in their first year.

Description: This core course, aimed at first-year standing students with fewer than 30 credits completed in a Faculty of Fine Arts degree program, focuses on key concepts across methods, practices and contemporary theories in the arts. Lecture and tutorial content, assignments and discussions focus on introducing and practicing critical discussions of multi and interdisciplinary cultural and artistic work in North America and beyond. During the year, students deepen their interdisciplinary skill sets in writing about culture, discussing ideas and perspectives, building a linguistic and visual vocabulary of current practices, forming critical stances while working across disciplines.

Component(s): Lecture; Tutorial

Notes:
  • This is a required course for all Bachelor of/Baccalaureate in Fine Arts students. It is strongly recommended that students take this course in their first year.

Fine Arts Interdisciplinary Courses

The following courses are open to students outside the Faculty of Fine Arts. See the course notes regarding admission for students in Fine Arts programs.
(also listed as FAFS 660 and FAFS 860.)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must complete 24 credits prior to enrolling. Permission of the Field School instructor is required.

Description: This course offers hands-on, experiential learning in one or more disciplines in the Fine Arts via faculty-led travel to and residency at a festival, conference, exhibition or partner institution either locally, nationally, or internationally.

Component(s): Field Studies

Notes:
  • Students may be considered to repeat this course for credit, provided the subject matter is different each time. Students who have received credit for a field school under another course code may be considered to repeat this course for credit provided the subject matter is different.
  • Students enrolled in this course are required to defray the costs of the field school.
  • Students must apply for this course by submitting required documentation.

Description:

This course explores how urban design and culture shape social interaction. It surveys the multiple meanings attributed to 'the night' through the lens of urban studies, human geography, sexuality studies, communication studies, and sociology, among others. Through analysis of and reflection on depictions of night, the course considers the binary constructions and representations of night and how those concepts have real world impacts.

Notes:
  • This course may not be applied within a BFA degree or any Fine Arts specialization, major or minor program.
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the cultural and social processes of food creation and consumption. Students make connections between various aspects of the food world and their own roles and responsibilities within the food system. Through an exploration, not only of things eaten, but also of food spaces and food‑related activities — including design, studio arts, and architecture — students discover that interactions with food are not as matter‑of‑fact as often assumed.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course introduces animation to students with little or no background in cinema or animation studies. Topics covered include major producers of animation; concepts, such as character development; and individual artists and genres, such as anime. Upon completion of this course students are able to discuss cartoonality and naturalism as they relate to both mainstream and independent animation.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course cannot be applied within a BFA degree or any Fine Arts specialization, major or minor program.
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course examines the subculture of hip hop in its contemporary and historic forms. Students study hip hop as a political and social movement that formed in reaction to the status quo in the United States and manifests through practices such as rapping, breakdancing and graffiti. The course covers a variety of media and perspectives through class discussions, self‑directed writing, and assigned readings, which are oriented to increase the students’ understanding of hip hop and its relationship to the changing nature of technology, corporate media, race relations and youth culture.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course may not be applied within a BFA degree or any Fine Arts specialization, major or minor program.
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: This lecture course introduces students to digital games, their history and their relationship to contemporary art practices. Digital games are considered as a medium of play, social interaction and artistic expression. The course situates digital games in an (art) historical context in order to better understand concepts of play in a digital age and the relevance of games to current art practices, beginning with examples of earlier games and their role as material culture. Students then reconsider the roles played by the art, the artist and the player/gamer as they are situated at the intersection between art, play and technology. Class discussions address life in virtual spaces and the relationships of power, capital, gender, ethnicity and other identities to both games and contemporary digital media.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course invites students to consider fashion as a key site for the construction of both the self and the social collective. Looking at a century of fashion and dress from a global perspective, the course explores decolonial approaches to studying fashion history and de-centres European fashion houses and the star system of designers as the only contributions of 20th-century fashion.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course cannot be applied within any Fine Arts specialization, major or minor program.
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course is an introduction to one of the world's most popular film genres, Bollywood. The course offers, through screenings and lectures, an opportunity to study the theory, culture and historical development of the Indian films being produced in Mumbai/Bombay. The course focuses on specific themes covered in this popular yet often contested genre, studying the aesthetics and narrative styles of some prominent filmmakers from this industry.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course cannot be applied within any Fine Arts specialization, major or minor program.
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.

Description: This course focuses on the powerful auditory dimension of moving pictures. Since the late 1920s, a sophisticated discourse has been woven into the voice, sound effect and music recordings that accompany screen images, yet its presence and contribution is still largely unnoticed by the vast majority of viewers. Over the term, critical and listening skills are developed promoting a fuller appreciation and understanding of cinematic and televisual sound design, as well as teaching students how to use their ears as well as their eyes whenever the moving contents of a screen draw their attention.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course cannot be applied within any Fine Arts specialization, major or minor program.
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a FFAR 298 number may not take this course for credit.
(also listed as SOCI 290 / SSDB 270 )

Description: This course surveys the major issues and challenges of the HIV pandemic. Such topics as the biology of the virus, therapeutic, clinical and epidemiological research developments, the social costs of sexual taboos and discrimination, and media and artistic representation by and of people with HIV are presented by faculty and visiting community experts. The epidemics in the Western hemisphere, Africa, Asia, and other regions are addressed. Learning is based on lectures, weekly tutorials, and community involvement.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:

Description: This course is an interdisciplinary survey of the major issues and challenges of the AIDS pandemic, introducing students to a broadly based overview of its scientific, social and cultural impacts. It also examines the interaction of personal and experiential perspectives with collective values, beliefs and behaviours in response to the health crisis worldwide and locally. Students examine the history of the pandemic and responses to it by governments, medical authorities, businesses, religious and community groups, as well as artists and cultural producers. Readings and requirements are diverse in nature and it is possible to submit creative work as part of the course assignments.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:

Description: A course at the introductory level which provides an opportunity for the study of specialized aspects of Fine Arts.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course may not be applied within a BFA degree or any Fine Arts specialization, major, or minor program.

Description: A course at the introductory level which provides an opportunity for the study of specialized aspects of Fine Arts.

Notes:
  • This course may not be applied within a BFA degree or any Fine Arts specialization, major, or minor program.

Description: A course which provides an opportunity for the study of specialized aspects of Fine Arts.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: A course which provides an opportunity for the study of specialized aspects of Fine Arts.

Interdisciplinary Studies in Sexuality Courses

Description: This introductory course surveys selected issues in sexual representation in the arts, primarily in the West. Media from the visual and performing arts including recent digital and interactive technologies are considered as well as various genres such as the classical nude, autobiography and pornography. The impact of the Sexual Revolution, feminism, and intersectionality is analyzed, with an emphasis on the diversity of sexualities and aesthetics in both the traditional and contemporary artistic environments. Although not a studio course, students may submit creative work undertaken independently as a course assignment.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: SSDB 220 or SSDB 275. Students must complete 30 university credits prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course is a multidisciplinary survey of the basic post‑1970 theories of sexual minorities and diversity, in their historical and cultural contexts. Authors from Michel Foucault to Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick are introduced, as well as the work of artists and performers from Derek Jarman to k.d. lang. The syllabus reflects the varying specializations of the instructors from year to year.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for INTE 392 may not take this course for credit.

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