English Courses

ENGL 206 Fundamentals of Written English – Stage I (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ESL 204 or placement test.

 

Description: This course provides training in grammar and idiomatic usage, through practice with articles and plurals, verb forms and tenses, prepositions and verb‑preposition combinations, sentence structure, and punctuation, as well as reading comprehension and vocabulary development through practice in paraphrasing short texts.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course does not count for credit within any English program.

  • Students who have received credit for this course may not subsequently take any ESL course for credit.

ENGL 207 Fundamentals of Written English – Stage II (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 206 or placement test.

 

Description: This course continues the work begun in ENGL 206 by providing additional training and practice in grammar and idiomatic usage, sentence structure and punctuation, as well as vocabulary development and reading comprehension through practice in paraphrasing and summarizing.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course does not count for credit within any English program.

  • Students who have received credit for this course may not subsequently take any ESL course or English course earlier in the composition sequence for credit.

ENGL 208 Introduction to English Composition and Literary Analysis (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete a placement test prior to enrolling.

 

Description: This course is intended for students who wish to improve their writing skills through written analysis of fiction, drama, and literary essays.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course does not count for credit within any English Literature, Creative Writing, or Professional Writing program.

  • Students who have received credit for this course may not subsequently take any ESL course for credit.

ENGL 210 Introduction to Essay Writing (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 207 or placement test.

 

Description: The course provides further practice in English composition by focusing on diction, sentence structure, punctuation, paragraph development, and essay writing.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course does not count for credit within any English program.

  • Students who have received credit for this course may not subsequently take ENGL 206 or ENGL 207 for credit.

ENGL 212 English Composition — Stage I (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 210 or placement test.

 

Description: This course is intended to help students produce clear, concise, logically organized essays and reports. Emphasis is placed on purpose, organization, and development through analysis and integration of information from a variety of sources.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this course may not subsequently take any ESL course or English course earlier in the composition sequence for credit.

ENGL 213 English Composition — Stage II (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 212 or placement test.

 

Description: This course further develops the writing skills acquired in ENGL 212 by familiarizing students with the processes and techniques necessary for the preparation of research papers and academic reports. Emphasis is placed on summarizing and paraphrasing, critiquing ideas and information, and synthesizing, citing, and documenting multiple sources. A library research skills component is a required part of this course.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:

ENGL 214 Editing I: Grammar, Usage, and Style (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 212.

 

Description:

This course offers a practical analysis of the conventions governing contemporary English grammar and usage, punctuation, sentence structure, and syntax. It focuses on stylistic effectiveness and persuasive power in diverse professional situations.

 

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this course may not subsequently take any ESL course or ENGL 206 ENGL 212 for credit.

ENGL 215 Editing II: Principles and Practice of Editing (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: ENGL 214.

 

Description:

This course builds on the concepts introduced in ENGL 214. Students are introduced also to copy editing and techniques for eliminating errors in style, mechanics, and fact, and substantive editing for identifying structural problems and reorganizing and rewriting documents.

 

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:

ENGL 216 Audience and Purpose in Professional Writing (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously or concurrently: ENGL 213.

 

Description: This course examines the ways that information is presented to a variety of audiences through writing and the interaction of texts and images.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:

ENGL 224 The Creative Process (3 credits)

Description:

This course introduces students to some options for developing their own process of literary creation, from the ENGLISH development of an idea through to the writing and editing of works of prose fiction, poetry, and/or drama. Coursework may include writing assignments, in‑class exercises, readings, group presentations, and discussions. This course is open to all students.

 

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course does not count for credit in any Creative Writing program (Major, Minor, Honours in English and Creative Writing).

ENGL 225 Introductory Creative Writing: Poetry (6 credits)

Description:

This is an introductory workshop in the writing of poetry. The first half of the course is an introduction to poetic forms and techniques. Required readings of poetry and critical essays, and exercises and assignments based on these readings, develop a common critical language and an understanding of poetry from a writer’s point of view. This knowledge is applied during the second half of the course, during which the class is conducted as a writing workshop. Students submit their original work for class discussion and evaluation.

 

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students wishing to register for ENGL 225, ENGL 226, or ENGL 227, should refer to admission requirements for Creative Writing.

ENGL 226 Introductory Creative Writing: Prose Fiction (6 credits)

Description:

This is an introductory workshop in the writing of prose fiction. The first half of the course is an introduction to prose forms and techniques. Required readings of fiction and critical essays, and exercises and assignments based on these readings, develop a common critical language and an understanding of fiction from a writer’s point of view. This knowledge is applied during the second half of the course, during which the class is conducted as a writing workshop. Students submit their original work for class discussion and evaluation.

 

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students wishing to register for ENGL 225, ENGL 226, or ENGL 227, should refer to admission requirements for Creative Writing.

ENGL 227 Introductory Creative Writing: Playwriting (6 credits)

Description:

This is an introductory workshop in the writing of plays. The first half of the course is an introduction to dramatic forms and techniques. Required readings of drama and critical essays, and exercises and assignments based on these readings, develop a common critical language and an understanding of drama from a writer’s point of view. This knowledge is applied during the second half of the course, during which the class is conducted as a writing workshop. Students submit their original work for class discussion and evaluation.

 

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students wishing to register for ENGL 225, ENGL 226, or ENGL 227, should refer to admission requirements for Creative Writing.

ENGL 231 Medieval Literature in Translation (3 credits)

Description:

This course studies influential texts in the Western tradition written between 400 and 1500, with emphasis on the innovations in the various genres of narrative (epic, saga, romance, tale) and erotic and ethical discourse. Texts by such writers as Marie de France, Chrétien de Troyes, Dante, and Petrarch, may be studied, as well as anonymous works such as Icelandic sagas and The Song of Roland.

 

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 233 Critical Reading (3 credits)

Description: This course is an introduction to the practice of close reading of selections chosen from poetry, fiction, drama, and non‑literary prose with the aim of developing the skills necessary to respond to written texts.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 234 Poetry (3 credits)

Description: Through a detailed examination of the various forms of poetry, this course is designed to familiarize students with the vocabulary and critical and technical concepts of the genre.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 235 Short Fiction (3 credits)

Description: Through a detailed examination of the various forms of short fiction and the novella, this course is designed to familiarize students with the vocabulary, critical concepts, and history of the genre.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 235N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 237 Tragedy (3 credits)

Description: This course is an introduction to the nature and varieties of tragic forms and sensibilities in Western literature. The course includes writers from antiquity to the present such as Sophocles, Euripides, Shakespeare, Behn, Racine, Hardy, Ibsen, Lorca, and Chopin.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 238 Comedy (3 credits)

Description: This course is an introduction to the nature and varieties of comic forms and sensibilities in Western literature. The course includes writers from antiquity to the present such as Aristophanes, Cervantes, Jonson, Molière, Sterne, Gogol, Wilde, Leacock, and Amis.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 240 Drama (3 credits)

Description: This course is an introduction to dramatic literature, principally in the Western tradition, and is designed to familiarize students with a selection of major works in this genre. Plays include ancient Greek dramas and works written for the stage by such writers as Aeschylus, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Calderòn, Webster, Racine, Molière, Büchner, Chekhov, Ibsen, Beckett, Handke, Stoppard, and Soyinka.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 241 The Novel (3 credits)

Description: This course is an introduction to the varieties of novelistic forms in world literature. It familiarizes students with critical approaches to the novel and the history of the novel as a literary genre.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 243 Satire (3 credits)

Description: This course is an introduction to the nature, varieties, and functions of satire, including writers from antiquity to the present, such as Juvenal, Horace, Erasmus, Swift, Voltaire, Byron, Butler, Orwell, Waugh, Spark, Richler, Vonnegut, and Atwood.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 244 Quebec/Montreal Writing in English (3 credits)

Description: This course surveys the literature of Quebec written in English, with emphasis on Montreal writing. It includes such writers as F.R. Scott, MacLennan, Klein, Dudek, Layton, Symons, Gallant, Richler, Cohen, Allen, Anderson, Glassco, and Mouré.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 246 Science Fiction (3 credits)

Description:

This introductory course explores the development of science fiction from Mary Shelley to H.G. Wells to the present day. Along with works by such authors as Huxley, Clarke, Dick, Delany, Le Guin, Atwood, or Gibson, translated works by such authors as Verne, Zamyatin, and Lem may be studied.

 

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 246N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 249 Children’s Literature (3 credits)

Description: As an introductory survey of children’s literature, this course includes works written primarily for adults but traditionally also read by children, works specifically written for children, as well as fairy tales and other versions of folklore and myth written or adapted for children.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 250 Forms of Popular Writing (3 credits)

Description: The topic of this course varies from year to year. It investigates such forms as spy novel, detective fiction, mystery, romance, travel writing, horror, and erotica in the context of the conventions, history, and popular appeal of the genre under discussion.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 251 The Graphic Novel (3 credits)

Description: This course examines both literary and popular antecedents to the graphic novel, the variety of its forms, and its status in contemporary literature. Students are introduced to critical approaches that can take account of both verbal and visual aspects of the graphic novel.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under an ENGL 398 number may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 255 Video Games and/as Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course is an introduction to the study of the formal, aesthetic and cultural aspects of video games. It places particular emphasis on the relationship of digital games to the history of literary form, introducing students to critical approaches that address the importance of narrative, the materiality of digital text, and the role of interpretive communities.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under an ENGL 398 number may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 260 Introduction to Literary Study (3 credits)

Description: This course introduces students to the practice of literary criticism at the university level through reading and writing about a variety of literary texts while developing the tools to analyze them in a close and critical fashion. This entails attention to the fundamentals and varieties of literary criticism — genre, rhetorical and figurative language, and narrative structure — as well as some attention to the role of theory in literary study.

Component(s): Lecture; Conference

ENGL 261 British Literature to 1660 (3 credits)

Description: Starting with selected Old English texts in translation, the course examines the literary production of the medieval period and the15th to 17th centuries in Britain. Works are studied in their social and historical contexts and, where possible, in relation to the other arts. The course may discuss Beowulf, Chaucer, Julian of Norwich, medieval drama, Malory, Skelton, Wyatt, Spenser, the Sidneys, Shakespeare, Webster, Donne, Lanyer, Burton, Browne, and Milton.

Component(s): Lecture; Conference

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 230 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 262 British Literature from 1660 to 1900 (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

It is recommended that students complete ENGL 261 prior to enrolling.

 

Description: This course surveys literature written in Britain from the period following the Civil War and Commonwealth to the end of the Victorian era, periods traditionally labelled Neo‑Classic, Romantic, and Victorian. The course considers such issues and forms as epic, mock‑epic, satire, the development of the novel, the comedy of manners, the rise of the professional writer, the romantic lyric, the increasing activity of women writers, the origins of modernism, and the interrelations among the periods.

Component(s): Lecture; Conference

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 230 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 298 Selected Topics in English (3 credits)

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

ENGL 299 Selected Topics in English (6 credits)

Description:

Specific topics for this course, and relevant prerequisites, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

 

ENGL 302 History of the English Language (3 credits)

Description: This course examines changes in the English language from the Anglo‑Saxon era to the present, considering such matters as pronunciation, inflections, syntax, vocabulary, and social distribution.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 303 Reading Women Writing (6 credits)

Description: This course offers an historical and theoretical perspective on writings by women from different periods, cultural contexts, and expressive forms. A close reading of selected novels, short stories, plays, and of polemical, poetic, and autobiographical works raises such issues as class, race, and gender; sexuality and creativity; national, collective, and individual identity; literary and political strategies of resistance; the use, transformation and subversion of literary forms; the popular and critical reception of individual works.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 304 Chaucer (6 credits)

Description: This course studies major texts of Geoffrey Chaucer with emphasis on Troilus and Criseyde and Canterbury Tales in terms of the social, literary, and historical issues opened by these texts.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 305 Studies in Medieval English Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course examines selected subjects in the history of Old English and Middle English literature. Specific topics and prerequisites for this course are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 306 Tolkien’s Old English (3 credits)

Description: This course studies the fantasy novels of J.R.R. Tolkien alongside the works of Old English literature that inspired him, considering the grammar of Old English and such selections as the Exeter Riddles, The Battle of Maldon, The Anglo‑Saxon Chronicle, and Beowulf in juxtaposition with Tolkien’s novels.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under an ENGL 305 number may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 307 The Viking Age in Poetry and Prose (3 credits)

Description: This course examines both Old English accounts of Viking incursions into England and Scandinavian accounts of Swedish and Danish migration, such as the Poetic Edda, skaldic poetry, and the Sagas, as well as the later‑medieval literature memorializing the period, such as Anglo‑Norman and Middle English romances, legal texts, chronicles, and saints’ lives.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 308 Mysteries, Miracles, and Medieval Drama (3 credits)

Description: This course studies drama in the period between the fall of the Western Roman Empire and the rise of the commercial theatre in the 16th century, focusing particularly on late‑medieval England. This course includes such works as the Wakefield (or Towneley) mystery plays, the N‑town plays, the York, Chester and Coventry Cycles, and morality plays such as Everyman.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 310 16th‑Century Prose and Poetry (3 credits)

Description: This course investigates aspects of the development of non‑dramatic literature from the late‑15th century to the 1590s, through an examination of representative poems and prose in their historical and cultural contexts. Works are selected from writers such as Skelton, Wyatt, Nashe, Spenser, Sidney, and Shakespeare.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 311 17th‑Century Prose and Poetry (3 credits)

Description: This course investigates aspects of the development of prose and lyric poetry from the 1590s through the Civil War and Commonwealth periods, including such issues as genre, form, the representation of subjectivity and gender, the function of patronage, and the shift to a print culture. Works are selected from writers such as Mary Sidney, Jonson, Lanyer, Donne, Browne, Herbert, Wroth, and Marvell.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 311N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 316 Spenser (3 credits)

Description: This course examines Spenser’s works, especially The Faerie Queene, in relation to such topics as genre, literary tradition, and historical and cultural contexts.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 317 Studies in English Renaissance Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course examines selected subjects in the history of English Renaissance literature. Specific topics and prerequisites for this course are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 318 English Renaissance Drama (3 credits)

Description: This course studies plays written in the period from the start of the English commercial theatre in 1576 until its closing in 1642, in terms of the development of dramatic forms, court and popular culture, and social history. The course includes such writers as Kyd, Marlowe, Middleton, Jonson, Cary, Webster, and Ford.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 318N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 319 Milton (3 credits)

Description: This course examines Paradise Lost and selections from Milton’s early poetry, especially Lycidas, in the contexts of 17th‑century writing, politics, and religion.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 320 Shakespeare (6 credits)

Description: This course examines a range of Shakespearean texts in relation to such matters as dramatic and theatrical conventions, social history, poetic language, high and popular culture, critical history, and influence.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 321 Restoration and Early 18th‑Century Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course studies British literature from 1660, when the monarchy was returned to power, to 1730, when the court no longer dominated British literary culture. The course examines the wide range of genres introduced or transformed by the period’s restless literary imagination, including the novel, satire, the letter, and the essay. It situates these developments in the context of changing ideas of status, gender, sexuality, science, politics, and economics.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 322 Restoration and 18th‑Century Drama (3 credits)

Description: This course examines the changing role of theatre in English culture after the re‑opening of the theatres in 1660 to the middle years of the 18th century: from aristocratic heroism and libertine scandals to increasingly middle‑class pleasures. It focuses on the transformation of dramatic conventions in such forms as the comedy of manners and sentimental tragedy and familiarizes students with the history of performance in the period, including the introduction of actresses and the codification of new acting styles.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 323 The Literature of Sensibility (3 credits)

Description: This course examines the structure and nature of feeling in British literature of the mid‑ and late‑18th century along with some consideration of concurrent developments in philosophy, historical and critical writing, and biography. It explores the contributions of concepts of sensibility and sympathy to aesthetic innovations such as realism, pornography, the gothic, and the sublime, and political developments such as feminism, abolitionism, and an emergent discourse of human rights.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 324 The 18th‑ and 19th‑Century Novel (3 credits)

Description: This course surveys developments in the British novel from its origins in documentary realism, satire, and romance, including the gothic, to the emergence of the novel as a dominant literary genre. The course includes works by such writers as Defoe, Fielding, Sterne, Radcliffe, Burney, Edgeworth, Austen, Dickens, the Brontës, Eliot, and Hardy.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 326 Studies in 18th‑Century British Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course examines selected subjects in the history of 18th‑century British literature. Specific topics and prerequisites for this course are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 327 Restoration and 18th‑Century Satire (3 credits)

Description: This course examines the development of satirical poetry, prose, and drama in the Restoration and 18th century. It explores formal issues such as satire’s debts and contributions to pastoral, georgic, epic, comedy and the novel alongside such social, political, and intellectual concerns as the battle of the ancients and the moderns, libel, sedition, and copyright law, the rise of party politics, and changing gender roles. Writers may include Marvell, Rochester, Dryden, Swift, Pope, Manley, Gay, Fielding, and Sterne.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 328 The Rise of the Novel (3 credits)

Description: This course examines the emergence and evolution of the novel and novel criticism from their beginnings in the 1680s until the end of the 18th century. It explores the reciprocal pressures of romance and realism in the formation of the novel in order to consider the ethical and aesthetic issues raised by this popular genre as well as the influences of other genres such as journalism, letters, diaries, and travel writing.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 329 Literature of the Romantic Period (6 credits)

Description: This course examines the prose and poetry of the Romantic period (ca. 1790 to 1830s) in relation to such topics as the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, domestic politics, literary conventions, and the idea of the poet. Among the poets to be considered are Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Some attention may be given to such writers as Dorothy Wordsworth,De Quincey, Hazlitt, the Lambs, Austen, Scott, Mary Shelley, and Peacock.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 325 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 331 18th‑ and 19th‑Century Writing by Women (3 credits)

Description: This course examines the poetry, prose, and drama of such writers as Astell, Manley, Finch, Haywood, Burney, Radcliffe, Edgeworth, Austen, Wollstonecraft, Shelley, the Brontës, and Eliot in such contexts as the gendering of authorship, the making of literary history, and the uses and transformations of literary conventions.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 332 Studies in 19th‑Century British Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course examines selected subjects in the history of 19th‑century British literature. Specific topics and prerequisites for this course are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 333 Studies in 19th‑Century British Poetry (3 credits)

Description: This course examines selected subjects in the history of 19th‑century poetry in Britain. Specific topics and prerequisites for this course are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 334 Studies in 19th‑Century British Prose (3 credits)

Description: This course examines selected subjects in the history of 19th‑century British prose literature, including possibly non‑fiction and fiction. Specific topics and prerequisites for this course are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 335 Literature of the Victorian Period (6 credits)

Description:

This course studies the poetry, fiction and other prose writings of such writers as Carlyle, Tennyson, the Brownings, the Brontës, Dickens, George Eliot, Newman, Ruskin, and Arnold. These works are examined in relation to such issues as class divisions, gender roles, the erosion of the authority of institutional religion, the increasing prestige of scientific explanation, the growth of British imperial power.

 

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 330 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 336 Late Victorian and Edwardian Writing (3 credits)

Description: This course investigates such matters as late Victorian art and aesthetic theory, the rise of modernism, literary experimentation, and the interrogation of traditional values. Works are selected from such writers as Butler, Pater, Wilde, James, the Rossettis, Swinburne, Morris, Meredith, Schreiner, Hardy, Conrad, and Forster.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 338 Modern British Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course examines British literature from the death of Queen Victoria in 1902 to the end of World War II in 1945, with reference to such topics as the world wars; the modernist coteries of Imagism, Vorticism, and Bloomsbury; the women’s suffrage movement; the decline of the empire and rise of militant Leftist and Right‑wing parties; and nationalist literary revivalism in Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. This course includes diverse works in a range of genres from this time period.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 337 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 339 British Literature Since 1945 (3 credits)

Description:

This course examines British literature since World War II with reference to such topics as the disintegration of the British Empire and the spread of its diaspora, the implementation of the Welfare State, entry into the European Community, Ulster sectarianism, mobilizations for gender equality and racial equity, youth culture from jazz and skiffle to punk and dub, the emergence of alternative theatre, the erosion of the State broadcasting monopoly and of State censorship, Thatcherism and Brexit. This course includes diverse works in a range of genres from recent decades.

 

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 337 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 340 Modernism (6 credits)

Description:

The congeries of experimental movements collectively identified as Modernism, flourishing from prior to World War I until World War II, renegotiated artistic conventions, revived neglected traditions, and turned attention to the primary materials of art (sound, colour, language). In painting emerged a tendency to abstraction, in music a tendency to atonality, and in literature to non‑mimetic forms. Experiments abounded in disjunctive, elliptical, impressionistic, allusive, and mythopoeic styles. Avant‑garde artists organized into numerous schools, including the Imagists, Surrealists, Dadaists, Constructivists, Futurists, and Vorticists. The literature, often produced by expatriates, was cosmopolitan, elitist, and provocative. Much of the most important work, appropriately enough in an era of female enfranchisement, was written by women. It was also the “Jazz Age,” the nexus of which was the Harlem Renaissance. While the course focuses on the lively cross‑fertilization of British and American writing, the international scope of Modernism is also emphasized, as well as its diversity (e.g. in ballet, cinema, music, and painting).

 

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 341 Modern Fiction (3 credits)

Description: This course examines a developing international literary culture from the early‑20th century to the post‑war period. Works are selected from such writers as Mann, Kafka, Proust, Stein, Camus, Borges, Nabokov, and Pynchon.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 342 Creative Writing: Prose Fiction (6 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 226. Enrolment in a Creative Writing program is required. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: Through intensive analysis and discussion of submitted work and directed reading in modern fiction, this workshop extends the development of students’ narrative skills and their understanding of fictional forms.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 426 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 343 Modern European Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course surveys late‑19th‑ and 20th‑century plays, poems, and novels in translation, chosen from such writers as Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Ibsen, Chekhov, Gide, Sartre, Colette, Akhmatova, Svevo, Mann, Musil, Böll, and Calvino.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 346 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 345 Modern Drama (3 credits)

Description: This course surveys the main currents of 20th‑century drama in a study of such writers as Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Lorca, Lady Gregory, Ionesco, Barnes, Beckett, Albee, Pinter, Orton, Stoppard, and Handke.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 347 Creative Non‑Fiction Writing (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 225 or ENGL 226 or ENGL 227. Enrolment in a Creative Writing program is required. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course is a workshop in the writing of creative non‑fiction (journal, personal essay, travel, biography and autobiography) including the reading of selected texts and discussion and criticism of students’ work.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 410 or for this topic under an ENGL 429 number may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 348 Creative Writing: Poetry (6 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 225. Enrolment in a Creative Writing program is required. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description:

Through intensive analysis and discussion of students’ work, experimentation with a variety of forms, and selected reading, this workshop helps students extend their grasp of poetics and their competence in the writing of poetry.

 

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 425 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 349 Modern Poetry in English (3 credits)

Description:

This course studies the theory and practice of poets writing in English during the 20th century. Examples are chosen from such writers as Yeats, Pound, Eliot, Crane, Stein, Auden, Stevens, Moore, Bishop, and Merrill, as well as from some more recent poets.

 

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 351 20th‑ Century Writing by Women (3 credits)

Description:

Through fiction, personal writings, poetry, and drama, this course examines gender and its discontents in turn‑of‑the‑century and mid‑century writing, in writing of the modernist period, and in writing of the politically oriented “second wave” of feminism of the 1960s and 1970s. Its concerns include the developing representation of race, class, and sexual orientation. Works are selected from such writers as Woolf, Hurston, Nin, Plath, Rich, Rule, Walker, Morrison, Cixous, Pollock, Gordimer, and El Saadawi.

 

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 352 Contemporary Writing by Women (3 credits)

Description:

This course deals with fiction, personal writings, poetry, and drama from the late 1970s to the present. Its concerns may include the challenges and possibilities of postmodernism; experiments in writing the life, writing the body, writing between genres, between cultures; collaborative writing; the uses and transformations of traditional and popular forms of writing. Works are selected from such writers as Morrison, Desai, Munro, Marlatt, Scott, Maracle, Aidoo, Winterson, Gallant, Anzaldua, and Rendell.

 

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 354 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 353 Contemporary Irish Literature (3 credits)

Description:

This course examines a selection of Irish literary texts reflecting the social, economic, political, and cultural transformations in both the North and the South, written since 1960 by writers such as Brian Friel, Seamus Heaney, Deirdre Madden, Eavan Boland, Dermot Bolger, Patrick McCabe, John McGahern, and Hugo Hamilton.

 

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students have received credit for this topic under an ENGL 359 or IRST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 354 Studies in Contemporary Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course examines selected subjects in literature of recent decades.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 350 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 355 Joyce (3 credits)

Description: This course will examine Joyce’s Ulysses in its formal, historical, and cultural contexts. Other writings of Joyce may receive some attention.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 356 The Irish Short Story Tradition (3 credits)

Description: This course traces the development of the Irish short story from its roots in the Gaelic story‑telling tradition and its origins as a literary form in the 19th century, in stories by such writers as James Joyce, Frank O’Connor, Elizabeth Bowen, Sean O’Faolain, Mary Lavin, Edna O’Brien, William Trevor, Ellis Ni Dhuibhne, and Bernard MacLaverty. Students discuss the narrative strategies used to explore various versions of Irish identity.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students have received credit for this topic under an ENGL 359 or IRST 398 number may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 357 The Irish Literary Revival (3 credits)

Description: This course traces the origins and nature of the extraordinary literary renaissance that occurred in Ireland from the 1880s to the 1920s. It examines issues such as the rise of Irish cultural nationalism and the concomitant turn to Ireland’s past, both mythic and historic, as well as the continuing influence of the Catholic Church and the British state. Writers studied include W.B. Yeats, Lady Gregory, J.M. Synge, James Joyce, and Sean O’Casey.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 358 Emigrants and Immigrants: Writing the Irish Diaspora (3 credits)

Description: This course examines various forms of literary expression — novels, stories, poems, and life‑writing (memoirs, autobiographies, letters) — from Ireland and the Irish Diaspora that address the experience of emigration, settlement, and integration of Irish migrants in various countries around the world. Issues explored include concepts of diasporic and transnational identities; the negotiation of forms of self‑understanding and self‑transformation in the context of hybridity, fluidity, and multiplicity; and the roles of landscape, memory, and cultural production as determining factors in the competing hegemonies of homeland and diaspora. A selection of texts by writers from Ireland (Brian Friel, Joseph O’Connor, Eavan Boland), Canada (D’Arcy McGee, Brian Moore, Jane Urquhart), America (William Kennedy, Alice McDermott, Maeve Brennan), England (Patrick MacGill, Elizabeth Bowen, William Trevor) and Australia (Thomas Keneally, Vincent Buckley) is explored. A selection of letters, diaries, and personal reflections by Irish immigrants is also studied.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students have received credit for this topic under an ENGL 359 number may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 359 Studies in Irish Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course examines selected subjects in the history of Irish literature. Specific topics and prerequisites for this course are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 360 American Literature (6 credits)

Description: A survey of American literature from the colonial period into the 20th century. Readings are drawn from such writers as Bradstreet, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Douglass, Chopin, Fitzgerald, and Faulkner.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 361 American Literature before 1800 (3 credits)

Description: This course concentrates on American Colonial literature from the early Puritan settlements to the aftermath of the Revolution, drawing on the works of such writers as Bradford, Rowlandson, Taylor, Franklin, Paine, and Jefferson.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 361N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 362 American Literature 1800‑1865 (3 credits)

Description: This course focuses on American writing from shortly after the Revolution to after the Civil War, tracing the development of an American literary tradition through the works of such authors as Irving, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Douglass, Whitman, and Dickinson.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 362N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 363 American Literature 1865‑1914 (3 credits)

Description: This course traces American literature from the conclusion of the Civil War until World War I, examining such authors as Twain, James, Harte, Jewett, Crane, DuBois, and Wharton.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 363N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 364 American Literature from 1914 to Mid‑20th Century (3 credits)

Description: This course traces American realism, modernism, and regionalism from World War I until the mid‑20th century, emphasizing such writers as Cather, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Moore, Toomer, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Welty, and Ellison.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 364N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 365 American Literature from Mid‑ to Late‑20th Century (3 credits)

Description: This course considers developments in American literature since World War II through the work of such writers as Plath, Bishop, Baldwin, O’Connor, Bellow, Nabokov, Pynchon, Updike, Oates, Morrison, Barthelme, and Walker.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 366 The American Novel (3 credits)

Description: This course concentrates on the American novel from its early emergence, through its experimental and sentimental periods, to its present range of forms, examining the works of such writers as Brockden Brown, Cooper, Stowe, James, Stein, Faulkner, Wright, Morrison, Updike, and Sorrentino.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 366N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 367 American Poetry (3 credits)

Description: This course considers the theory and practice of American poetry from the 19th century to the present through the work of such writers as Whitman, Dickinson, Frost, H.D., Pound, Stevens, Williams, Olson, Ginsberg, Waldman, Bishop, and Ashbery.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 368 African‑American Literature to 1900 (3 credits)

Description: This course traces the emergence of African‑American literature, from early poetry and slave narratives to later autobiographies and novels, examining such writers as Wheatley, Turner, Douglass, Jacobs, Harper, Chesnutt, Washington, and DuBois.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 368N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 369 African‑American Literature 1900 to Present (3 credits)

Description: This course considers African‑American literature from the renewal of southern segregation laws, through the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, and contemporary writing, tracing the works of such writers as Toomer, Hurston, Hughes, Wright, Ellison, Giovanni, Reed, Walker, Dove, and Morrison.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 370 Canadian Literature (6 credits)

Description: This course examines the development of Canadian literature from its beginnings to the present day through a series of representative works of prose and poetry, written in or translated into English.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 373 19th‑Century Canadian Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course studies the literature written in Canada in a variety of genres as the country evolved from colony to nation. It explores such topics as the relations among discourse, nation building, gender, and genre.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 374 Canadian Fiction to 1950 (3 credits)

Description: This course studies the themes and technical strategies of Canadian fiction from the 1890s to the mid‑20th century by such authors as Roberts, Montgomery, Leacock, Callaghan, Ross, MacLennan, Mitchell, and Smart.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 376 Postwar Canadian Fiction (3 credits)

Description: This course studies Canadian fiction from 1950 through the mid‑1960s as it incorporates the lyrical and the documentary, the universal and the regional, the traditional and the experimental. Authors may include Roy, Wilson, Buckler, MacLennan, Watson, Wiseman, Cohen, and Richler.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 377 Contemporary Canadian Fiction (3 credits)

Description: This course studies the continuity and development of Canadian fiction from the mid‑1960s to the present. Authors may include Laurence, Davies, Carrier, Wiebe, Atwood, Munro, Kogawa, Shields, Gallant, and Ondaatje.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 378 Modern Canadian Poetry (3 credits)

Description:

This course examines the changes in Canadian poetry from the beginning of the 20th century to the mid‑1960s by such authors as Pratt, Klein, Scott, Livesay, Birney, Page, Layton, Purdy, and Avison.

 

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 379 Contemporary Canadian Poetry (3 credits)

Description: This course examines the development of Canadian poetry from the mid‑1960s to the present by such authors as Atwood, Ondaatje, Nichol, MacEwan, Kroetsch, Webb, Kogawa, Dewdney, and Brand.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 379N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 380 First Nations/North American Native Literature (3 credits)

Description:

This course studies the native literature of Canada and/or the United States, from oral performance traditions, transcriptions and translations into English, and writing in English by such authors as Johnston, Campbell, King, Highway, Momaday, Erdrich, Allen, and Silko.

 

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 381 Literature of Ethnic America (3 credits)

Description: This course examines questions of ethnicity in American literature, challenging what Crevecoeur described in the 18th century as the melting pot from the perspective of such writers as Cahan, (Henry and Philip) Roth, Baldwin, Cisneros, Kingston, Silko, Tan, and Hosseini.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 382 Postcolonial Literature (3 credits)

Description:

This course offers a historical and theoretical introduction to literature in English from formerly colonized regions. The course examines a selection of texts — from regions such as Africa, South Asia, and the Caribbean — that address such issues as the spread of English through British colonial contact and the development of writing in English both during and after the colonial period.

 

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 383 African Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course considers how literature in English by writers from sub‑Saharan Africa is embedded in the history and experience of colonization and decolonization. The course includes such authors as Achebe, Soyinka, Saro‑Wiwa, Emecheta, Okri, Armah, Aidoo, Farah, Dangarembga, Coetzee, and Gordimer. The focus is on the political and aesthetic issues raised by African writing in English.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 384 Creative Writing: Playwriting (6 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 227. Enrolment in a Creative Writing program is required. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: Through reading of contemporary playwrights and intensive discussion and analysis of submitted work, this workshop helps students refine their skills in the process of completing a fully formed one‑act play.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 344 or ENGL 427 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 385 Studies in Postcolonial Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course examines selected subjects in the field of postcolonial literature. Specific topics and prerequisites for this course are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 386 Caribbean Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course explores how Caribbean literature in English from nations such as Barbados, Trinidad, Antigua, Jamaica, Grenada, St. Lucia, and Guyana is implicated in the history of slavery, colonialism, and postcolonialism. The work of such authors as Bennett, Walcott, Brathwaite, Goodison, James, Selvon, Lamming, Naipaul, Brodber, Cliff, and Kincaid is examined in relation to the writers’ socio‑cultural contexts and to the political and aesthetic issues raised by their texts.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 387 South Asian Literature (3 credits)

Description: This course studies literature from South Asia written in English by authors from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka, such as Rushdie, Anand, Das, Narayan, Ghosh, Desai, Chaudhuri, Markandaya, Sahgal, Selvadurai, Sidhwa, Rao, and Mistry. The focus is on the significance of precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial socio‑cultural concerns as expressed in a variety of literary genres. Attention is given to English as a tool of colonization as well as a means for critiquing cultural hegemony.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 388 Literature from Australia and New Zealand (3 credits)

Description: This course examines literature in English from Australia and New Zealand by such writers as White, Malouf, Jolley, Carey, Stead, Mudrooroo, Stow, Johnson, Frame, Hulma, Wedde, and Kenneally. Central to the course is a discussion of the impact of colonialism, and the ongoing relationship between settler and aboriginal communities as it inflects a variety of literary genres. Literature from the Pacific islands may also be considered.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 388N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 389 History of Criticism and Literary Theory (3 credits)

Description: This course surveys and contrasts major theories of criticism, with attention to methodologies and historical contexts. Texts are chosen from such representative theorists as Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Lessing, Bakhtin, and in English Sidney, Dryden, Johnson, Coleridge, Arnold, Eliot, Woolf, Empson, Burke, and Frye.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 390 Studies in Rhetoric (3 credits)

Description: This course offers an inquiry into the nature and function of rhetoric, the art of convincing others, through an examination of such influential classical writers as Aristotle, Cicero, and Quintilian, as well as the place of rhetoric in contemporary critical discourse. This course offers, through written exercises, practical experience in the development of rhetorical techniques.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 390N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 391 Studies in Literature and Science (3 credits)

Description: This course compares the modes of description, investigation, and analysis in science and literature as reflections of the division of modern knowledge into the arts and sciences. How have scientific discoveries enriched or impoverished literature or critical thinking? How have literary texts represented science and the scientist? In what ways has scientific investigation been informed by literature? How does the comparison with science make it possible to explore and question the methodologies that have been developed from the study of literature? The course may focus on such topics as the development of the microscope, the telescope, evolutionary theory and neuroscience.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under an ENGL 326 number may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 392 Aspects of Criticism and Literary Theory (3 credits)

Description: This course examines selected subjects in criticism and literary theory.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 393 Gender and Sexuality in Literary Studies (3 credits)

Description: This course examines the development of the terms “gender” and “sexuality” as categories of historical analysis and literary interpretation by reading feminist and queer theories of gender and sexuality such as those of Rubin, Butler, Sedgwick, and Foucault alongside a range of historical and contemporary literary texts.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 445 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 394 Contemporary Critical Theory (3 credits)

Description: This course introduces students to various interpretive strategies in contemporary critical theory, through a study of such topics as structuralism, narratology, debates about genealogy, deconstruction, psychoanalytic theory, gender and performativity. Readings may include texts by Nietzsche, Saussure, Barthes, Foucault, Derrida, Eco, Austin, Cixous, and Sedgwick.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 394N may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 395 Technical Writing (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 213.

 

Description: This course examines written and visual strategies for communicating information in technical fields. Practice includes experience in audience analysis and visual design in the preparation of such documents as technical abstracts, reports, proposals, descriptions, and instructional manuals.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this course may not subsequently take ENGL 206 ENGL 213 for credit.

ENGL 396 Content Creation and Management in Professional Writing (6 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 213 or placement test.

 

Description: This course is intended for students who have mastered the essentials of composition and who wish to develop their ability to write effectively for professional purposes. Emphasis is placed on creating content for different media platforms, working in teams, and managing writing projects.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this course may not subsequently take ENGL 206 ENGL 213 for credit.

ENGL 397 Writing for Business (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 213.

 

Description: This course examines strategies for communicating information in business contexts. Practice includes audience analysis and visual design in the creation of such business documents as letters, memos, minutes, brochures, press releases, and company newsletters.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this course may not subsequently take ENGL 206 ENGL 216 for credit.

ENGL 398 Selected Topics in English (3 credits)

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

ENGL 399 Selected Topics in English (6 credits)

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

ENGL 414 Literary Publishing and Editing (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 225 or ENGL 226 or ENGL 227. Enrolment in a Creative Writing program is required. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course explores the process of founding and operating small presses or magazines, and follows the creation of a book from manuscript to the marketplace. It includes accessing primary research materials; understanding how the writer and editor collaborate to arrive at the best possible literary text for publication; agents, copyright contracts and other essential issues for writers; understanding the parts of a book; the design and production values that make a good book; and the transition from print to digital.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 413 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 415 Literary Production: Curating and Archiving the Literary Event (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 225 or ENGL 226 or ENGL 227, Enrolment in a Creative Writing program is required. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course introduces contemporary modes of distributing literary production. Students conceive, implement, and manage all aspects of a reading series, including the development of a mandate, solicitation and review of materials, event organization, and the introduction of work online, verbally, and in print. Students also aid in the development and maintenance of a related blog and an archive of current and previous reading series.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under an ENGL 429 number may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 416 The Solo Play (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 227 and ENGL 384. Enrolment in a Creative Writing program is required. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This focused workshop explores the nature, structure, and practice of writing solo works for the stage. A solo play is written for a single actor who may play one or more characters. It emphasizes the audience‑performer communication while remaining fundamentally theatrical in its codes. By the end of the course, the student will have completed a 40‑ to 60‑minute solo piece.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under an ENGL 429 number may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 417 Writing for Media (6 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: ENGL 227 and at least one 300‑level creative writing class. Enrolment in a Creative Writing program is required. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course is a creative writing workshop in the composition and development of scripts for media that may include film, TV, video games and podcasts. In any given year, the course focus is determined by the instructor.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 411 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 428 Advanced Studies in Creative Writing (6 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Enrolment in a Creative Writing program is required. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required. See current Undergraduate Class Schedule for specific workshop prerequisites.

 

Description: This course is an advanced workshop intended for students who have completed at least six credits of workshops at the 300 or 400 level in an appropriate field. The subject and prerequisites for each year are found in the current Undergraduate Class Schedule. Submission of a brief portfolio may be required for admission.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 429 Advanced Studies in Creative Writing (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Enrolment in a Creative Writing program is required. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required. See current Undergraduate Class Schedule for specific workshop prerequisites.

 

Description: This course is an advanced workshop intended for students who have completed at least six credits of workshops at the 300 or 400 level in an appropriate field. The subject and prerequisites for each year are found in the current Undergraduate Class Schedule. Submission of a brief portfolio may be required for admission.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 430 Old English (6 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course studies the language, literature, and culture of the Anglo‑Saxon era, including such texts as elegaic lyrics and sections of Beowulf.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 432 Middle English (6 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description:

This course studies the variety of texts in English dialects from 1200 to 1500, including such works as Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and other romances, Piers Plowman, Pearl, the Showings of Julian of Norwich, other religious and social discourse, lyrics, and drama.

 

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 433 Gender and Sexuality in the Middle Ages (3 credits)

Description: This course investigates, through such discourses as literature, law, and natural philosophy, debates about misogyny and courtly love, virginity and chastity, marriage, reproduction, same‑sex desire, and female autonomy. Works are selected from such writers as Chretien de Troyes, Langland, Heloise d’Argenteuil, Christine de Pizan, Margery Kempe, and Julian of Norwich.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 434 Advanced Studies in Early English Literature (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course is a seminar on a selected topic, text, or author.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 435 Women Writers of the Early Modern Period (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course examines the emergence into print of women writers from the late‑16th to the late‑17th centuries, by exploring such issues as the construction of literary history, histories of gender and sexuality, the relations between gender and genre. Works are chosen from such writers as Sidney, Sowernam, Wroth, Cary, Lanyer, Philips, Cavendish, Behn, Killigrew, Manley, and Trotter.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 436 Literature of the Civil War and Commonwealth Period (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course studies the prose and poetry of the 1630s through the 1650s. It explores the ways in which the Civil War was represented by such writers as Herrick, Suckling, Cowley, Bradstreet, Milton and Marvell. Political tracts, journalism, and private papers and diaries may also form part of the material of the course.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 437 Advanced Studies in Renaissance and Early Modern Writing (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description:

This course is a seminar on a selected topic, text, or author.

 

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 438 History, Politics, and Literature in the 18th Century (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course examines the relations among the categories of history, politics, and literature, and their development as distinct discourses over the course of the century, through a study of such topics as the status of religion, the rise of science, the expansion of empire, the development of aesthetic discourse, and the construction of the category of the neoclassical.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 439 The Rise of Criticism and Literary History (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course traces the joint development of the discourses of literary criticism and literary history from 1660 to the legislation assigning copyright to authors in the late‑18th century. Examples are drawn from such writers as Dryden, Dennis, Addison, Shaftesbury, Hume, and Johnson.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 440 Advanced Studies in Late‑17th‑ and 18th‑Century Writing (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course is a seminar on a selected topic, text, or author.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 441 Forms of 18th‑ and 19th‑Century Fiction (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course may focus on a single writer, a type of fiction such as the gothic or the epistolary, or a particular issue in the development of the novel, such as realism or the emergence of women’s fiction.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 442 Comparative 19th‑ Century Literature (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description:

This course studies literary developments in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Canada, including such issues as Romanticism, the development of national literatures, conceptions of place and landscape, and responses to cultural change.

 

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 443 Advanced Studies in 19th‑Century Literature (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course is a seminar on a selected topic, text, or author.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 444 Advanced Studies in Gender and Sexuality (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course is a seminar in the study of theories of gender and sexuality as they can be used in the interpretation of historical and/or contemporary texts.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for ENGL 445 may not take this course for credit.

ENGL 446 Advanced Studies in 20th‑Century Writing (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: This course is a seminar on a selected topic, text, or author.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 447 Advanced Studies in Literary Theory (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course is a seminar on a selected topic, text, or author.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 449 The American Postmodern (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description:

This course focuses on postmodern American writers in the context of the critical debates about what constitutes the postmodern: formally, generically, and politically. It considers such writers as Antin, Ashbery, Waldman, Pynchon, Barthelme, Barth, Acker, Ford, and Morrison.

 

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 450 Advanced Studies in American Literature (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: A seminar on a selected topic, text, or author. Specific content varies from year to year.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 451 History and Ideology in Canadian Literature (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course studies the treatment in Canadian literature of such historical and political events, issues, and ideologies as the Conquest, the railroad, the threat of American domination, immigration, and the Canadian west.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 452 Recent Experiments in Canadian Writing (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course studies contemporary writing that breaks with or interrogates traditional literary genres and forms. Examples are drawn from such authors as Kroetsch, Marlatt, Ondaatje, Highway, Dewdney, Mouré, and Nichol.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 453 Advanced Studies in Canadian Writing (3 credits)

Description: This course is a seminar on a selected topic, text, or author.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 454 Advanced Studies in Postcolonial Writing (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course is a seminar on a selected topic, text, or author.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 455 The American Nation (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course focuses on such issues in American literature as the cosmopolitan, the regional, the local, and the transnational, exploring the theoretical and literary ways in which writers enshrine, consolidate, or call into question ideas of the American nation.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 470 Honours Seminar (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete 30 credits in English. Enrolment in the Honours English Literature is required.

 

Description: The topic of this course varies from year to year. The course provides the opportunity for final‑year honours students to apply their experience of literature, literary theory, and criticism on a more advanced level.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • In consultation with the honours/majors advisor, honours students may substitute another course at the 400 level for ENGL 470.

ENGL 474 Honours Essay (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete 30 credits in English prior to enrolling. Enrolment in the Honours English Literature is required. Permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: With the permission of the Department, an honours student may arrange a tutorial program with a faculty member, culminating in the writing of a long paper.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 480 Independent Studies (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must complete nine credits at the 300 level prior to enrolling Enrolment in an English program is required. Permission of the Department is required.

 

Description: With the permission of the Department, a student may arrange a tutorial program with a faculty member.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 486 SLS‑International Literary Seminars (3 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Permission of the coordinator of Creative Writing, or designate is required.

 

Description: This course, held at one of several locations around the world in conjunction with Summer Literary Seminars (SLS), offers intensive workshops in the writing of fiction, poetry, or drama, and includes discussion and written criticism of students’ work and a series of lectures. Students are expected to read widely and to submit their own work for discussion and analysis. Grading is based on participation, and on submission of a final portfolio and an essay.

Component(s): Lecture

ENGL 490 Joint Tutorial in History and English (6 credits)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed nine credits in English Literature, or must be enrolled in an English program.

 

Description: A tutorial for students in an English and History Joint Specialization program.

Component(s): Lecture; Tutorial

ENGL 498 Advanced Topics in English (3 credits)

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

ENGL 499 Advanced Topics in English (6 credits)

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

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