Chemistry and Biochemistry Courses

Notes

  • A student may be exempted from one or more of the introductory courses, on the basis of work done at the Cegep level. Where exemptions are given, replacement courses must be chosen with the approval of a department advisor. In the case of certain programs approved by the Ordre des chimistes du Québec, the courses must be replaced with an equivalent number of credits in the same subdiscipline as the exemptions.
  • Students who have successfully completed the Cegep equivalent for CHEM 205, 206, 221 and/or 222 should verify on their Concordia student record that they have received an exemption.
  • Similarly, students who have successfully completed the equivalent course(s) at another university should verify on their Concordia student record that they have received credit or exemption as appropriate for this course. If not, they should see the departmental advisor.

Description: This course introduces the non‑science student to the fundamentals of chemical analysis as it is used in modern forensics. It introduces the basic concepts of the scientific method, molecules and chemical reactions, primarily focusing on chemical analysis. The key techniques used in modern forensics are presented with applications in drug, DNA, fingerprint, explosive and combustion/ arson analysis.

Component(s): Online

Notes:
  • This course is not a prerequisite for any Chemistry course. Students in programs leading to the BSc degree may take this course as an elective, but may not take this course for credit to be applied to their program of concentration.

Description: This course examines the development of chemistry before the 20th century from the Greek, Chinese and Islamic religions and philosophies to the development of measurement and instrumentation to analyze matter. The objective is to understand the roots of modern chemistry, and look at contributions and principles that are representative of the period in which they emerged.

Component(s): Online

Notes:
  • This course is not a prerequisite for any Chemistry course. Students in programs leading to the BSc degree may take this course as an elective, but may not take this course for credit to be applied to their program of concentration.

Description: Stoichiometry, states of matter, atomic structure, electron structure of atoms, the periodic table, periodic properties, bonding, solids. Students who have successfully completed the Cegep equivalent of this course should verify on their Concordia student record that they have received an exemption.

Component(s): Lecture; Tutorial; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students in programs leading to the BSc degree may not take this course for credit to be applied to their program of concentration.

  • This course presumes a good grounding in secondary‑school mathematics. Students lacking such grounding or non‑science students seeking only an awareness of chemistry are advised to enrol in CHEM 208.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: CHEM 205.

Description: Thermochemistry, solutions and their properties, equilibrium, ionic equilibrium, pH, buffers, kinetics, reaction mechanisms, other selected topics related to biochemistry, biology, and engineering. student record that they have received an exemption.Students who have successfully completed the Cegep equivalent of this course should verify on their Concordia

Component(s): Lecture; Tutorial; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students in programs leading to the BSc degree may not take this course for credit to be applied to their program of concentration.

Description: This course is designed as an introduction to chemistry for non‑science students. It concentrates on establishing the chemical concepts and vocabulary necessary to understand the many roles chemistry plays in people’s daily lives. Issues to be presented will range from design and testing of drugs to protection of the ozone layer. The chemical phenomena, methodology, and theory will be presented as needed to understand the various issues covered in the course.

Component(s): Online

Notes:
  • This course is not a prerequisite for any Chemistry course. This course may not be taken for credit by science students.

Description: The course begins with an exploration of the roles of genes and proteins in life processes. It then proceeds to an examination of the basic scientific principles behind manipulation of biological molecules to produce desired changes. Students are introduced to the specific applications of the technology to medicine, agriculture, and the environment. Economic and ethical issues raised by biotechnology are also examined.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • This course is intended for non‑scientists, and may not be taken for credit by Biochemistry or Biology students.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 205, CHEM 206; PHYS 204, PHYS 206, PHYS 224, PHYS 226; MATH 205; or equivalents for all prerequisite courses.

Description: This course introduces the basic concepts of analytical chemistry to students in the biological sciences. Topics include treatment of analytical data; chemical equilibria and titrations; introduction to spectroscopy; separation science; electrochemistry.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • This course may not be taken for credit by students registered in a Chemistry or Biochemistry program.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 205, CHEM 206; PHYS 204, PHYS 206, PHYS 224, PHYS 226; MATH 203, MATH 205; or equivalents for all prerequisite courses.

Description: Precipitation methods and solubility products; activity, chemical equilibria and titration curves of neutralization and complexation systems; treatment of analytical data.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: CHEM 217.

Description: Chemical equilibria and titration curves of oxidation‑reduction, precipitation, and non‑aqueous systems; potentiometry and potentiometric titrations; introduction to spectroscopy with emphasis on molecular and atomic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 205, CHEM 206.

Description: Basic aspects of orbitals and their role in covalent bonding; delocalization of electrons. Alkanes: structure, nomenclature, isomerism, reactions. Introductory stereochemistry: enantiomers, diastereomers, conformers, Fischer and Newman projections, specification of chirality, E/Z isomerism. Conformations of cyclic compounds. Alkylhalides: SN1; SN2; E1; E2 reaction mechanisms. Free‑radical reactions, organometallic compounds. Chemistry of alkenes, alkynes, and dienes. Students who have successfully completed the Cegep equivalent of this course should verify on their Concordia student record that they have received an exemption.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: CHEM 221.

Description: Introduction to the use of IR and NMR spectroscopy for the identification of simple organic compounds. Benzene and aromatic compounds: aromaticity, electrophilic aromatic substitution, nucleophilic aromatic substitution, substituent effects. Chemistry of aldehydes and ketones: nucleophilic addition, oxidation, reduction, and condensation reactions, tautomerism. Chemistry of carboxylic acids and their derivatives. Chemistry of alcohols, ethers, and related compounds. Amines: basicity, reactions. Student record that they have received an exemption.Students who have successfully completed the Cegep equivalent of this course should verify on their Concordia

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 205, CHEM 206; PHYS 204, PHYS 206, PHYS 224, PHYS 226; MATH 203, MATH 205; or equivalents for all prerequisite courses.

Description: The properties of real gases; fugacities; first, second and third laws of thermodynamics; the Phase Rule; one‑ and two‑component systems; real solutions, and partial molal properties.

Component(s): Lecture; Tutorial

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: CHEM 234.

Description: Mathematical treatment of experimental results; theories of reaction rates; unimolecular reactions; the steady‑state approximation; factors influencing rates of reactions in solution; acid‑base catalysis; catalysis by enzymes and the Michaelis‑Menten mechanism; free‑radical reactions; photochemical reactions; experimental methods and techniques.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 205, CHEM 206; PHYS 204, PHYS 206, PHYS 224, PHYS 226; MATH 203, MATH 205; or equivalents for all prerequisite courses.

Description: The structure of the atom; the periodic table; properties of atoms, covalent bonding treatments including Lewis theory, valence shell electron pair repulsion theory of structure, valence bond and molecular orbital theory. Crystal field theory applied to the structure and properties of transition metal complexes. Bonding theories of metallic materials and semi‑conductors.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: CHEM 241.

Description: A survey of the properties and reactions of: hydrogen; Group 1, lithium to cesium; and Group 2, beryllium to radium; including the theory of ionic bonding and structure. The descriptive chemistry of Group 13, boron to thallium; Group 14, carbon to lead; Group 15, nitrogen to bismuth; Group 16, sulphur to polonium; Group 17, the halogens; and Group 18, the chemistry of the noble gases.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: CHEM 221.

Description: An introduction to the essentials of biochemistry: protein structure, enzymology, carbohydrate metabolism, electron transport, integration and regulation of metabolism.

Component(s): Lecture; Tutorial; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 212 or CHEM 217; or equivalent.

Description:

This course is an introduction to environmental chemistry. It provides a solid understanding of environmental processes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere and soil including exchange processes at their interfaces. Students learn how sources and sinks of pollutants work and how to calculate fluxes between environmental compartments. The course also examines the analytical methods employed for monitoring these processes.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 298 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: CHEM 222.

Description: This course examines the identification of organic compounds using methods based on electronic, vibrational, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopies. In each case, there is an introduction to the principles of the spectroscopy and a discussion of how its spectra vary with structure. Particular emphasis is placed upon the UV‑visible spectra of conjugated molecules; the identification of functional groups by IR spectroscopy; the use of NMR spectroscopy, including 2D methods, for the determination of stereochemistry; and the use of mass spectrometry for ascertaining molecular constitution. The use of computer simulation and information retrieval for structure determination is introduced.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for CHEM 393 may not take this course for credit.

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: CHEM 218.

Description: Emission spectroscopy; X‑ray spectroscopy; voltammetry and polarography; amperometric titrations; coulometry and coulometric titrations, conductometry; chromatography with particular emphasis on gas chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography. Laboratory is taken concurrently and provides experience in analytical techniques described in lectures.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: A minimum of 15 credits in chemistry including CHEM 222 and CHEM 293.

Description: Topics in this course include a mechanistic survey of reactions of major synthetic utility, the determination of reaction mechanisms, and the importance of reactive intermediates including carbocations, carbanions, radicals, and carbenes.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed a minimum of 15 credits in chemistry including CHEM 222 and CHEM 293 prior to enrolling.

Description: This course focuses on organic structure and stereochemistry including the relationship of stereochemistry to physical properties and chemical reactivity, and the determination of organic structure and stereochemistry by chemical and spectroscopic means. The concept of molecular symmetry is also introduced.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: CHEM 324.

Description: The structures, mechanisms of action, and biosynthetic origins of biologically important compounds such as fatty acids, polyketides, terpenes, steroids, alkaloids, and beta‑lactam antibiotics are discussed. The role of traditional organic chemistry in the development of modern biochemistry and biotechnology is illustrated with examples from medicine and agriculture.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following course must be completed previously: CHEM 222.

Description: Introduction to the fundamental aspects of polymers and polymerization. Methods of preparation, reaction mechanisms and kinetics of polymer synthesis including condensation polymerization; addition polymerization: free radical, anionic, cationic; heterogeneous (Ziegler‑Natta) and homogeneous (metallocenes) coordination polymerization. Polymer characterization and uses. Lectures and problem sessions.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 234, CHEM 241.

Description: The course introduces students to the concept of quantum mechanics and the electronic structure of atoms and molecules. Topics include the origins and postulates of quantum theory, the Schrödinger equation and applications to simple systems such as the harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor and the hydrogen atom. The course looks at the quantum mechanical treatment of the chemical bond and provides an introduction to spectroscopy.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 234, CHEM 235, CHEM 271, CHEM 293.

Description: This course examines the physical basis for the structures of biomolecules (energetics of protein folding), the organization and structures of bio‑membranes and biologically relevant systems, and intermolecular interactions (e.g. ligand binding). Both fundamental theory and techniques used to characterize these physical properties are covered.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 217, CHEM 218, CHEM 241, CHEM 242.

Description: Theories of bonding in transition metal complexes, including ligand field theory, applied to structure, physical properties, and reactivity of transition metal complexes: organometallic chemistry and catalysis. Metals in biological systems.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 221, CHEM 222, CHEM 271.

Description: A survey of selected pathways in intermediary metabolism, including their regulation and physiological significance, lipid, amino acid and nucleoside metabolism, cholesterol biosynthesis, urea cycle and the biochemistry of protein synthesis.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 271 or CHEM 312. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course presents the concepts, tools and common instrumental techniques employed in modern bioanalytical chemistry for the quantitative analysis of drugs, metabolites, toxins, environmental contaminants, biomarkers, proteins, biotherapeutics and/or DNA in biological samples. Topics may include sample preparation, mass spectrometry, immunoassays, biosensors, microfluidics, bioanalytical method validation and discussion of emerging bioanalytical techniques and trends. The applications discussed encompass toxicology, forensics, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, clinical chemistry, environmental analysis, and biotechnology.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 271 or CHEM 312; six credits of 300-level CHEM courses. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course surveys and critically discusses the state-of the-art mass spectrometry-based approaches that are driving the metabolomics and proteomics revolution for applications such as shotgun proteomics, quantitative proteomics, posttranslational modifications, top-down proteomics, untargeted metabolomics, lipidomics, metallomics, structural biology and molecular structure characterization.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 218, CHEM 312.

Description: High performance liquid separations on an analytical (non‑preparative) scale are surveyed. Fundamental separation mechanisms and application of the techniques are discussed. Emphasis is placed on separations of biologically relevant analytes which include peptides, proteins and nucleic acids.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 60 credits including the 45‑credit Core program, or equivalent, with a GPA of 2.00 (C) or better in Core program courses.

Description: In collaboration with and under the direction of a member of Faculty, the student carries out independent study and practical work on a problem chosen from the student’s area of concentration. The student presents his or her work to the Department in the form of a scientific poster and submits a written report to the supervisor.

Component(s): Laboratory

Notes:
  • During the academic session before the one in which this project is to be undertaken, the student must have obtained the consent of the Department, by consultation with the CHEM 419 coordinator, and must have also been accepted by a faculty supervisor. Independent study and practical work.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 222, CHEM 235; CHEM 324 or CHEM 325.

Description: Determination of organic reaction mechanisms using kinetics, activation parameters, acid‑base catalysis, Bronsted catalysis law, solvent effects, medium effects, isotope effects, substitutent effects, and linear free energy relationships.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 324. Students must have completed 30 credits in chemistry prior to enrolling. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course is designed to introduce students to advanced methods in organic molecule synthesis. It includes an introduction to retrosynthetic analysis, a survey of some important classes of reactions, with particular emphasis on mechanistic understanding and rationale for observed selectivity when appropriate. The strategic use of specific reactions in complex molecule synthesis is highlighted.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 222, CHEM 271.

Description: This course introduces students to various topics in nucleic acid chemistry. The topics include nomenclature, structure and function of RNA and DNA; techniques and methods to investigate nucleic acid structure; DNA damage and repair; interaction of small molecules and proteins with nucleic acid; oligonucleotide‑based therapeutics (antisense, antigene, RNAi); synthesis of purines, pyrimidines and nucleosides; and solid‑phase oligonucleotide synthesis.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 293 previously or concurrently.

Description: This course offers an introduction to reactive intermediates with an emphasis on structure and stability as found in modern (physical) organic chemistry. While the focus is on radicals and carbenes, carbocations are discussed near the end of the term. The material covered is relevant to chemistry and biochemistry.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for CHEM 393 or for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 222. If perquisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description:

This course introduces some basic aspects of polymer chemistry with an emphasis on polymer synthesis. Various methods are discussed, including classical step growth, free radical, and ring opening polymerization; and other more recent methods such as living anionic, living cationic, and living controlled/radical polymerization. Additionally, the design and development of functional polymers as building blocks to develop nanomaterials for bio‑related applications, particularly drug delivery applications, are presented. Other topics may include amphiphilic block copolymers, self‑assembly, micellar nanocarriers, cellular imaging, multifunctional drug delivery, cross‑linked nanogels/hydrogels, materials science, and biomedical engineering.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 293, CHEM 324.

Description: This course provides an introduction to the small molecule drug discovery process, addressing early target identification, hit discovery, lead optimization, preclinical considerations, up to clinical trials. The course focuses primarily on the rational design and synthesis of drugs that employ multidisciplinary approaches to satisfy a multitude of specificity and safety requirements. The emphasis is on organic synthesis within the special context of medicinal chemistry that illustrates the challenges involved in leveraging the opportunities presented by high throughput, parallel and/or combinatorial synthesis in light of physical limitations imposed by processing large numbers of compounds. Case studies from the current literature are used to highlight how new technologies and strategies have overcome some of those limitations and are used to highlight recent innovations in the field. The course also charts the evolution of powerful techniques from structural research (NMR, X-ray crystallography, and computational modelling) as fully integrated medicinal chemistry tools for modern drug-discovery to highlight key advances.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 234, CHEM 241, CHEM 333 or CHEM 335. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course presents the concepts, tools, and techniques of modern computational chemistry, and provides a very broad overview of the various fields of application across chemistry and biochemistry. The course is divided into two parts: 1) Molecular structure, which covers molecular mechanics and elementary electronic structure theory of atoms and molecules; and 2) Chemical reactivity, which covers applications of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics techniques to studies of chemical reactions. The applications discussed include organic molecules and their reactions, peptides and proteins, drug design, DNA, polymers, inorganics, and materials. The course includes a practical component where students acquire hands‑on experience with commonly used computational chemistry computer software.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 234, CHEM 235.

Description: This course examines the physical chemistry of interfaces including surface and interfacial tensions, the absorption of surface active substances/surface excess properties, and surfactant self‑assembly. Topics covered may include Gibbs and Langmuir monolayers, micelle formation, emulsions, foams, surfactant liquid crystals, layer‑by‑layer polymer self‑assembly, and biological membranes. Techniques for characterization and applications (biological and industrial) of these systems are addressed.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 234, CHEM 271.

Description: This course offers a hands‑on introduction to the computer tools used to predict the structure of a protein from its amino acid sequence, and to gain insight into its function. Students learn modelling techniques such as sequence alignment, homology modelling, computer visualization, molecular dynamics, and molecular docking. Computer laboratory with pre‑lab lectures.

Component(s): Lecture; Laboratory

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 341. The following courses must be completed previously or concurrently: CHEM 324. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course covers the structure and properties of organometallic compounds, their main reactions and their application in catalysis and organic chemistry.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 234 and CHEM 241.

Description: This course explores how chemistry enables solar energy conversion (as a source of alternative energy) through photochemistry/photobiology and photovoltaics (solar cells). In the first subject area, solar energy conversion through artificial photosynthesis, solar fuels catalysis, and photobiological fuel production is examined. In the second subject area, the fundamental principles governing solar energy to electricity conversion, efficiency of solar cells, different photovoltaic implementations (inorganic, organic, hybrid) and charge separation/transport are explored. Special focus topics include the design, synthesis and spectroscopic tools needed to study inorganic molecules and materials for solar fuels catalysis.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Students must have completed 60 credits including either the 45‑credit Core Chemistry and Biochemistry program, or the 33‑credit Core Environmental and Sustainability Science program, or equivalent. Enrolment in the Chemistry and Biochemistry program, or the Environmental and Sustainability Science program, with a program GPA of 3.3 or better is required. If prerequisites are not satisfied, written permission of the Department.

Description: The student works on a research project in the student’s area of concentration, selected in consultation with and conducted under the supervision of a faculty member of the Department. The student writes a thesis on the results and defends it before a departmental committee.

Component(s): Thesis Research

Notes:
  • During the academic session before the one in which this project is to be undertaken, the student must have obtained the consent of the Department, by consultation with the CHEM 450 coordinator, and must have also been accepted by a faculty supervisor.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 217, CHEM 218, CHEM 221, CHEM 222, CHEM 234, CHEM 235, CHEM 241.

Description: This modular course covers the areas of production, characterization and applications of nanoscale structures and materials. Each module is taught by a different professor as well as guest lecturers. Topics may include (but are not limited to) size dependent properties, synthesis of organic and inorganic nanostructures, self‑assembled structures, chemical patterning and functional nanopatterns, biomaterials. Nanometer scale fabrication techniques such as lithographic methods, nano‑stamping and patterned self‑assembly are discussed. Modern analysis techniques such as atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy, which are used to map and measure at the single molecule level, are introduced. Applications such as photonics, optical properties, biodetection and biosensors, micro‑ and nano‑fluidics, nanoelectronics and nanomachines are presented. The course includes a term project carried out using the nanoscience facilities held in the Department research labs.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 217, CHEM 218, CHEM 312; or students must be enrolled in a BSc Environmental and Sustainability Science program and have previously completed CHEM 212 or CHEM 217.

Description: The major aim of this course is to present a quantitative treatment of the variables that determine the composition of natural waters. Chemical equilibrium is the central theme of the course, but consideration is also given to kinetics, steady‑state and dynamic models. Related themes include global chemical cycles, air and water pollution, as well as current research topics in water chemistry and chemical oceanography.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for CHEM 418 or for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 271, CHEM 375; BIOL 367. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course examines the biochemical effects of environmental stresses on organisms, and adaptations that allow organisms to face these stresses. Emphasis is placed on biochemical responses to toxic compounds such as aromatics, halogenated aliphatics, drugs, and heavy metals. Other topics may include adaptations to stresses such as temperature extremes, pathogens, and ionizing radiation. Applications to related biotechnological processes are also considered.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 271, CHEM 375.

Description: Steady‑state kinetics, including the use of initial velocity studies and product inhibition to establish a kinetic mechanism; nonsteady‑state kinetics, isotope effects, energy of activation, detailed mechanisms of selected enzymes.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 222, CHEM 271.

Description: Introduction to the general principles of toxicology with emphasis on the toxic effects of chemicals in humans. Dose‑response relationship, types and routes of exposure, absorption and disposition of toxic substances, toxicokinetics, types of toxic response, and factors affecting toxic response. Toxicity testing, risk assessment, and interpretation of toxicological data.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 271, CHEM 375. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course provides an advanced examination of current topics in research related to understanding protein‑protein interactions in vitro and in vivo. Topics may include biological roles of protein‑protein interactions; evolution of protein‑protein interactions and correlated mutations; stable vs. transient interactions and their biological significance; interactomics; structural characteristics of protein‑protein interaction interfaces; targeted disruption of protein‑protein interactions and drug design; experimental approaches to measuring protein‑protein interactions.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: CHEM 375. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course examines how natural products interact with their cellular targets, with a special emphasis on the role of antibiotics and anticancer drugs. It also explores the role of these compounds in their natural environment, with a focus on intra-species competition and symbiosis.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 271, CHEM 375. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course examines the principles behind protein design, how techniques of protein engineering are used, and the methods used to assess protein properties. Examples include studies of protein stability, structure‑function relationships, and applications to drug design.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: BIOL 266; CHEM 375. If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the Department is required.

Description: This course discusses what is known about how the membranes of biological organisms are assembled and the roles that these membranes play in a number of important processes. Emphasis is placed on the transport of proteins to and through biomembranes and the roles that membranes play in metabolite and ion transport. Where applicable, the significance of these processes is illustrated by examining the roles of membranes in health and disease.

Component(s): Lecture

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for this topic under a CHEM 498 number may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 271, CHEM 375.

Description: Theory and practice of techniques in enzymology and protein chemistry, including steady‑state and stopped‑flow enzyme kinetics, ligand binding, immunological techniques, proteomics, computer modelling, and chemical modification of proteins.

Component(s): Tutorial; Laboratory

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 271, CHEM 241.

Description: Role of metals in biochemical systems. Essential trace elements, zinc enzymes, oxygen transport and storage, metalloproteins and biological electron transfer, structure‑function relationships in heme enzymes, nitrogen fixation; model compounds for metallo‑proteins and metalloenzymes.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

Completion of the core courses of the BSc Environmental and Sustainability Science is required prior to enrolling.

Description:

The course is designed to integrate the knowledge from several courses and provide students an opportunity to apply this knowledge to a current issue in environmental sciences through experiential learning. Students work in small groups made up from participants of all streams and critically evaluate an environmental issue using the expertise of all participants. Examples could be the reclamation of a former mining site, plans for expansion of a landfill or plans for a new water treatment plant. Aspects evaluated include, but are not limited to, land use, impact on vegetation and biota, availability of critical chemical data (e.g. trace metals, water/runoff quality, and impact on the local population). The result is a detailed environmental assessment report prepared by students.

Notes:
  • Students who have received credit for BIOL 487 or GEOG 487 may not take this course for credit.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 222, CHEM 293.

Description: This course is designed to provide the background in magnetic resonance theory necessary to understand modern high‑resolution NMR experiments and instrumentation. The basic theory in the introductory section also applies to electron spin resonance (ESR). Relaxation and through‑bond and through‑space interactions, and experiments to investigate them are considered. Spin manipulations and behaviour in multiple‑pulse, Fourier transform NMR techniques used for common spectral editing and two‑dimensional experiments are discussed.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 218, CHEM 222, CHEM 271.

Description: Production and interpretation of mass spectra. Topics include ionization methods (electron impact, chemical ionization and fast‑atom bombardment); interpretation of mass spectra; introduction to quantitative analysis by mass spectrometry.

Component(s): Lecture

Prerequisite/Corequisite:

The following courses must be completed previously: CHEM 241, CHEM 293; six credits of 300‑level CHEM courses which must include either CHEM 325 or CHEM 341.

Description: This course presents advanced techniques to characterize the geometric and electronic structures of molecules. Topics may include spectroscopic (rotational, vibrational, electronic, photoelectron, NMR, EPR, Mössbauer), diffraction and electrochemical methods. The course introduces the techniques and applies them to concrete case studies.

Component(s): Lecture

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

Description: Specific topics for this course, and prerequisites relevant in each case, are stated in the Undergraduate Class Schedule.

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