Tracy Hecht, PhD

Associate Professor, Management


Tracy Hecht, PhD
Office: S-MB 14369 
John Molson Building,
1450 Guy
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 2785
Email: tracy.hecht@concordia.ca

Tracy Hecht completed her PhD (2002) in Industrial and Organizational Psychology at the University of Western Ontario. Dr Hecht's current research explores work-life balance in the Canadian workforce. Her work examines the boundaries that exist between employees' work and their personal lives, and how the strength of these boundaries influences, and is influenced by, employee attitudes and well-being. She also seeks to understand how participation in different roles (e.g., work, family, leisure, and community) can enhance and facilitate well-being, rather than create conflict and stress. Dr. Hecht's research also investigates the process of multi-tasking in the workplace, and the dynamics of teams in organizations.

Education

PhD (University of Western, Ontario)

Areas of expertise

  • Employee well-being
  • Multi-tasking
  • Person-job fit
  • Polychronicity
  • Teams in the workplace
  • Work-life balance
  • Work/non-work boundaries


Publications

Refereed Journal Articles

Hecht, T.D. & McCarthy, J.M. (in press). Coping with employee, family and student roles: Evidence of dispositional conflict and facilitation tendencies. Journal of Applied Psychology.

Meyer, J.P., Hecht, T.D., Gill, H., & Topolnytsky, L. (2010). Person-organization (culture) fit and employee commitment under conditions of organizational change: A longitudinal study. Journal of Vocational Behavior.

Hecht, T.D. & Boies, K. (2009). Spillover from non-work to work: An exploration of its structure and correlates. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 14, 414-426.

Hecht, T.D. & Allen, N.J. (2009) A longitudinal examination of the work-nonwork boundary strength construct. Journal of Organizational Behaviour, 30, 839-862.

Hecht, T.D. & Allen, N.J. (2005). Exploring links between polychronicity and well-being from the perspective of person-job fit: Does it matter if you prefer to do only one thing at a time? Organizational Behaviour and Human Decision Processes, 98, 155-178.

Allen, N.J. & Hecht, T.D. (2004). Further thoughts on the romance of teams: A reaction to the commentaries. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 77, 485-491.

Allen, N.J. & Hecht, T.D. (2004). The "romance of teams": Toward an understanding of its psychological underpinnings and implications. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 77, 439-461.

Hecht, T.D., Allen, N.J., Klammer, J.D., & Kelly, E.C. (2002). Group beliefs, ability and performance: The potency of group potency. Group Dynamics, 6, 143-152.

Allen, N.J. & Hecht, T.D. (2000). Team-organization alignment and team behaviour: Implications for Human Resources Management. The HRM Research Quarterly, 4, 1-5.


Participation activities

Refereed Conference Presentations

Hecht, T.D., Dyer, L., & Lupachow, J. (2009). Predictors of job performance among teleworkers and onsite workers. Abstract published in Canadian Psychology, 50 (2a):251-252.

Martens, M. L., Hecht, T. D., Lvina, E., & Casey-Campbell, M. A latent growth model examination of group cohesion and performance. (2007). In D. Morin and T. Stone (Eds.), Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Administrative Sciences Association of Canada, 28, 5: 175-192.

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