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Nicole M. Alberts

Associate Professor, Psychology


Nicole M. Alberts
Office: L-PY 170-20 
Psychology Building,
7141 Sherbrooke W.
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 2185
Email: nicole.alberts@concordia.ca
Website(s): Google Scholar Profile

Education

BA (University of Saskatchewan) 
MA (University of Regina)
PhD (University of Regina) 
Pre-Doctoral Residency (University of Washington) 
Post-Doctoral Fellowship (University of Washington) 

Research Interests

My research program focuses on improving behavioural health and psychological outcomes among individuals across the lifespan. I view digital health as an approach that can be used to assist with achieving this goal via increasing access to evidence-based interventions for youth and adults. As such, I use digital health to answer key research questions and to develop and test interventions targeting outcomes such as chronic pain, anxiety, depression, and health behaviours. 

Specific areas of interest include: 

  • Chronic pain in childhood cancer survivors
  • Pain in youth undergoing cancer treatment 
  • Fear of cancer recurrence; cancer-related worry 
  • Pain in youth and adults with sickle cell disease 
  • Health anxiety 
  • Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy 
  • Wearable-based interventions 




Teaching activities

Seminar on Ethical and Professional Issues in Psychology (PSYC 720)


Research activities


Publications

Selected Publications

Alberts, N.M., Leisenring, W.M., Flynn, J.S., Whitton, J., Gibson, T.M., Jibb, L., McDonald, A., Ford, J.,  Moraveji, N., Dear, B.F., Krull, K.R., Robison, L.L., Stinson, J.N., & Armstrong, G.T. (In Press). Wearable respiratory monitoring and feedback for chronic pain in adult survivors of childhood cancer: A feasibility randomized controlled trial from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study. JCO: Clinical Cancer Informatics.

Alberts, N.M., Kang, G., Li, C., Richardson, P.A., Hodges, J., & Hankins, J., Klosky, J. L. (In Press). Expression and predictors of pain in youth with sickle cell disease: A report from the Sickle Cell Clinical Research and Intervention Program. The Clinical Journal of Pain.

Alberts, N.M.,* Badawy, S.M.,* Hodges, J., Estepp,J.H., Nwosu, C., Khan, H., Smeltzer, M.P., Homayouni, R., Norell, S., Klesges,L., Porter, J.S., & Hankins, J.S. (2020). Development of the InCharge Health mobile app to improve adherence to hydroxyurea in patients in sickle cell disease: A user-centered design approach. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 8 (5): e14884       *Shared first authorship 

Heidelberg, R.E., Alschuler, K. N., Ramsey,W.A., & Alberts, N.M. (2020). Hypnosis for pain in pediatric oncology: Relevant and effective or an intervention of the past? Pain, 161 (5), 919-915.

Ramsey, W.A., Heidelberg, R.E., Gilbert,A.M., Heneghan, M.B., Badawy, S. M.**, & Alberts, N.M.** (2020). eHealthand mHealth interventions in pediatric cancer: A systematic review ofinterventions across the cancer continuum. Psycho-Oncology, 29 (1), 17-37.    **Shared senior authorship 

Alberts, N.M., Gagnon, M.M., & Stinson, J.N. (2018). Chronic pain in survivors of childhood cancer: A developmental model of pain across the cancer trajectory. Pain, 159 (10), 1916-1927.

Alberts, N.M., Law, E.F., Chen, A.T., Ritterband, L.M., & Palermo, T.M. (2018). Treatment engagement in an Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral program for pediatric chronic pain. Internet Interventions, 13, 67-72.

Alberts, N.M., Hadjistavropoulos, H.D.,Dear, B.F., &Titov, N. (2017). Internet-delivered cognitive-behaviour therapy for recent cancer survivors: A feasibility trial. Psycho-Oncology, 26(1),137-139.

Noel, M., Alberts, N.M., Langer, S.L., Levy, R. L., Walker, L. S., & Palermo, T. M. (2016). The sensitivity to change and responsiveness of the adult responses to children's symptoms in children and adolescents with chronic pain. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 41(3),350-362.

Alberts, N.M., Hadjistavropoulos, H. D., Jones, S., & Sharpe, D. (2013). The Short Health Anxiety Inventory: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 27(1),68-78.


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