Concordia University

https://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/jmsb/faculty.html

Dr. Joel Bothello

Assistant Professor, Management

David Ward
Office: S-MB 13125 
John Molson Building,
1450 Guy
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 2781
Email: joel.bothello@concordia.ca
Website(s): http://www.joelbothello.com/

Joel Bothello is an Assistant Professor in Management at the John Molson School of Business. His research lies at the intersection of organization theory and governance studies. More specifically, he investigates how organizational governance can be shaped by the use of transnational "soft-law" tools such as standards, compacts, rankings, directives, certification schemes and awards. 

Joel formerly held a teaching fellowship in International Management at the King's College London School of Management and Business, as well as a research fellowship at the ESSEC Philanthropy Chair in France. His research has been published in Organization Studies, IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management and Theory and Society. He has also been the recipient of awards such as the 2014 Halloran Award in Business Ethics and the 2015 Syntec Prize. His dissertation was runner-up for the 2015 EDAMBA Best Dissertation award.

Areas of Interest

Institutional Theory, Governance structures, Discourse and Narratives, (Comparative) case studies

Education

  • Ph.D. - ESSEC (2014)
  • Doctorat en sciences de gestion - Université de Cergy Pontoise (2014)
  • Mastère spécialisé - ESSEC (2011)
  • BAS - York University (2008)


Publications

Peer-Reviewed Articles

Bothello, J. & Salles-Djelic M.L. (forthcoming) “Evolving Conceptualizations of Organizational Environmentalism: A Path Generation Account" Organization Studies

Linder, S. & Bothello, J. (2015) “Antecedents to Autonomous Strategic Action: What about Decline?" Transactions on Engineering Management, vol. 62(2): 226-236. 

Djelic, M.L. & Bothello, J. (2013) “Limited Liability and its Moral Hazard Implications – The Systemic Inscription of Instability in Contemporary Capitalism.” 
Theory and Society, vol. 43(6): 589-615.

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