Sharlene He

Assistant Professor, Marketing


Office: S-MB 13.235 
John Molson Building,
1450 Guy
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 2713
Email: sharlene.he@concordia.ca

Sharlene He is an Assistant Professor of Marketing. Her research examines consumer judgment and decision processes, with focus on providing insight into questions of theoretical and practical importance. She has developed conceptual frameworks that provide novel understanding of important consumer judgment processes, such as how consumers form judgments of willingness-to-pay and how the attraction effect occurs in choice. She also investigates the effects of psychological uncertainty and control in consumer judgment processes and examine consumers’ reliance on algorithmic recommendations in making decisions.

She has been awarded research grants by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Her research is published in top marketing journals, including Journal of Consumer Research and Journal of Marketing Research.

Sharlene received her PhD in Marketing from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. She also holds an MSc in Economics from University of Toronto and a BComm from Queen's University.


Publications

He, Sharlene and Brian Sternthal (forthcoming), “Beyond Numbers: An Ambiguity-Accessibility-Applicability Framework to Explain the Attraction Effect,” Journal of Consumer Research.

Rocklage, Matt, Sharlene He, Derek D. Rucker, and Loran Nordgren (forthcoming), “Beyond Sentiment: The Value and Measurement of Consumer Certainty in Language,” Journal of Marketing Research.

He, Sharlene and Eric T. Anderson (2021), “Conceptualizing and Measuring Pathways for How Object Attachment Affects Willingness to Pay (WTP),” Current Opinion in Psychology, Volume 39.

Rucker, Derek D. and Sharlene He (2018), “The Role of Attitudes in Advertising,” Handbook of Attitudes, Second Edition.

He, Sharlene and Derek D. Rucker (2018), “Mindsets,” The SAGE Encyclopedia of Lifespan Human Development.

Rucker, Derek D. and Sharlene He (2016), “Psychological Mindsets Affect Consumption: How Different Mindsets Help (Hurt) Portion Control,” Appetite, 103, 425-431.


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