Concordia University

https://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/faculty.html

Nancy St-Onge, PhD

Associate Professor, Health, Kinesiology and Applied Physiology

Office: L-SP 165-23 
Richard J. Renaud Science Complex,
7141 Sherbrooke W.
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 5805
Email: Nancy.St-Onge@concordia.ca
Website(s): Perform Centre Website

Education

PhD (University of Montreal), MSc (University of Montreal), BSc (Mcgill University)

Dr. Nancy St-Onge joined the department of Exercise Science at Concordia after completing post-doctoral studies at the School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University.

Research interests

Dr. St-Onge's main interest is to investigate movement control in healthy and impaired populations. She is interested in how healthy and special populations control their posture and react to perturbations. She studies how electromyographic, kinetic, and kinematic adjustments to mechanical perturbations are affected in health and disease. Variables which are indicative of injury and recovery could be used as an objective basis to decide about the management of special populations and develop or evaluate the outcome of rehabilitation protocol or surgery.


Teaching activities

Courses

EXCI 351: Introduction to Biomechanics of Human Movement 
EXCI 451: Clinical Biomechanics


Publications

Robbins S.M., Caplan R.M., Aponte D.I., St-Onge N. Test-retest reliability of a balance testing protocol with external perturbations in healthy adults. Submitted to Gait and Posture, May 2017


Bruce H., Aponte D., St-Onge N., Phillips N., Gagné J.-P., Li K.Z.H. (2017) The effects  of age and hearing loss on dual-task balance and listening. The Journals of Gerontology. Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, in press.


St-Onge N., Samani A., Madeleine P. (2017) Integration of active pauses and pattern of muscular activity during computer work. Ergonomics, in press.


Chadnova E., St-Onge N., Courtemanche R., Kilgour R.D. (2016) Age-related differences in maximal voluntary rate performance are characterized by changes in kinematics and muscle activation patterns. Submitted to Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, in press.

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