Concordia University

https://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/faculty.html

Andrew Ivaska, PhD

Associate Professor, History

Office: S-LB 1041-09 
J.W. McConnell Building,
1400 De Maisonneuve W.
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 2419
Email: andrew.ivaska@concordia.ca

Education


Ph.D. in History, University of Michigan (Supervisors Frederick Cooper & Nancy Rose Hunt)
M.A. in Arab Studies, Georgetown University
B.S. in Foreign Service, Georgetown University

Biography and Research Interests

I am a historian of modern Africa with research interests that center on Africa’s place in the 20th century world. My early work focused on urban contests around gender, global culture, youth, modernity, and the state in early postcolonial Tanzania. This culminated in my first book, Cultured States: Youth, Gender, and Modern Style in 1960s Dar es Salaam (Duke University Press, 2011), which the AHR review called "a pioneering work in the historiography of postcolonial Africa." Cultured States won the Bethwell A. Ogot Prize, awarded by the African Studies Association for the best book in Eastern African Studies, and was a finalist for the Wallace K. Ferguson Prize, awarded by the Canadian Historical Association for the best book in a field outside of Canadian history. The book reflects my longstanding interest in how everyday landscapes of urban modernity in Africa became entwined with the political cultures of colonial and postcolonial statehood.

My new book project, tentatively titled Liberation Itineraries: Dar es Salaam, Political Exile, and the Making of the 1960s, reconfigures the global map of Sixties political activism from the vantage point of one of its key Third World relay stations. Dar es Salaam hosted an extraordinary range of political exiles in these years – from Southern African liberation movement cadres, to African American sojourners, Marxist academics, and revolutionary chancers. Tracing the networks that fed into, intersected within, and stretched beyond Dar es Salaam reveals a dense history of connections between far-flung movements and phenomena conventionally held apart: African student migration, US civil rights, Southern African exile politics, American soft power, worldwide campus struggles, intra-movement class tensions, and revolutionary self-fashioning. While this circuitry was globe-spanning, it was also narrowly channeled and intimate; it generated rich solidarity, as well as inequality and strife. In seeking to understand how these political attachments were formed and frayed, the project looks not just to the realm of formal politics but also to the thick web of social connections and affective ties that marked it. Ultimately, I aim to open up a more emergent history of “global Sixties” political engagement, one attuned to the capacious connections, everyday modes of practice, and socio-material infrastructures through which movements rose and fell. For early pieces from this project, see the list of publications below.

I welcome graduate students and undergraduate honors majors interested in the history of Africa and its diasporas, 20th century transnational history, global intellectual history, and themes including youth, gender, aesthetics, urbanism, political culture, and histories of the left. For more on student supervision and placement, as well as courses taught, see the teaching section below.


Publications

Books


Cultured States: Youth, Gender, and Modern Style in 1960s Dar es Salaam. 
Durham: Duke University Press, 2011.

• Winner of the 2012 Bethwell A. Ogot Prize, awarded by the African Studies Association for the best book in Eastern African studies


• Finalist for the 2012 Wallace K. Ferguson Prize, awarded by the Canadian Historical Association for the best book in a field outside of Canadian history


AHR review of Cultured States

https://www.academia.edu/15103329/AHR_Review_of_Cultured_States_


Articles and Book Chapters

"Liberation in Transit: Eduardo Mondlane and Che Guevara in Dar es Salaam." In The Routledge Handbook of the Global Sixties: Between Protest and Nation Building, edited by Chen Jian, Martin Klimke, Masha Kirasirova, Mary Nolan, Marilyn Young, and Joanna Waley-Cohen. London: Routledge, 2018.

"Movement Youth in a Global Sixties Hub: The Everyday Lives of Transnational Activists in Postcolonial Dar es Salaam." In Transnational Histories of Youth in the Twentieth Century, edited by Richard Ivan Jobs and David M. Pomfret. New York: Palgrave Macmillan Transnational History Series (series editor, Akire Iriye), 2015.

"Consuming and Contesting ‘Soul’ in Tanzania." In New World Coming: The Sixties and the Shaping of Global Consciousness, edited by Karen Dubinsky, Catherine Krull, Susan Lord, Sean Mills, and Scott Rutherford. Toronto: Between the Lines, 2009.

"In an 'Age of Minis': Women, Work and Masculinity Downtown." In 
Dar es Salaam: Histories from an Emerging Metropolis, edited by James Brennan, Andrew Burton and Yusufu Lawi, 213-31. Dar es Salaam and Nairobi: Mkuki na Nyota and the British Institute in Eastern Africa, 2007.

“Of Students, ‘’Nizers,’ and a Struggle over Youth: Tanzania’s 1966 National Service Crisis,” 
Africa Today 51.3 (2005): 83-107.

“Contesting Postcolonial National Culture: The Short Life of a Tanzanian Ban on ‘Soul,’” 
Moving Worlds 5.1 (2005): 120-32.

“’Anti-Mini Militants Meet Modern Misses’: Urban Style, Gender, and the Politics of ‘National Culture’ in 1960s Dar es Salaam.” In 
Fashioning Africa: Power and the Politics of Dress, edited by Jean Allman, 104-21. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2004.  [Revised version of Gender and History article.]

“’Anti-Mini Militants Meet Modern Misses’: Urban Style, Gender, and the Politics of ‘National Culture’ in 1960s Dar es Salaam, Tanzania,” 
Gender and History 14:3 (November 2002): 584-607.


Select Research Grants

Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight Development Grant, Co-Investigator (1 of 3) – "China in Tanzania, Tanzania in China: Beyond High Politics" (2012-2013)

Concordia University Seed Grant, Co-Investigator (1 of3) – "China in Tanzania, Tanzania in China: Development, Migration, Power and Protest" (2009-10)

Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Standard Research Grant, Sole Principal Investigator -- "Black Diasporic Politics and Style in 1960s and 1970s Tanzania: A Transnational History" (2007-11)

Fonds Québécois de recherche sur la société et la culture (FQRSC), Nouveaux chercheurs Fellowship, Sole Principal Investigator -- "Gender, Public Space and the Politics of Urban Identity in Postwar Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 1945-1980" (2004-07)

Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Award – “Urban Popular Culture, the Tanzanian State and the Politics of ‘National Culture” (2000-01)

SSRC International Dissertation Research Fellowship – “Urban Popular Culture, the Tanzanian State and the Politics of ‘National Culture” (2000-01)


Teaching activities

Student supervision and placement

I am committed to mentoring graduate and undergraduate students in preparation for further work in and beyond academia. Since arriving at Concordia, I have supervised two Ph.D. students (one still current), eight M.A. theses, and three B.A. honors theses, in addition to serving as a committee member for over a dozen more. Several of my former students have gone on to top international doctoral programs and to jobs in academia, government, and the NGO sector. For details, see below.

I welcome email inquiries by potential graduate students and honors undergraduate majors interested in the history of Africa and its diasporas, 20th century transnational history, global intellectual history, and themes including youth, gender, aesthetics, urbanism, political culture, and histories of the left.

Graduate and honors students (current and former)


Ph.D.

Samantha Moyes (in-program)

  • Thesis: "Righting the Everyday: Petitioners and UN Trusteeship Status in Late Colonial Tanganyika, 1948-1960"
Rachel Sandwell (McGill University degree, co-chaired with Elizabeth Elbourne)
  • Thesis: “Governing Exile: Tensions of Gender, Generation, and Community in the External Mission of the African National Congress, 1960-1989” (completed 2014)

M.A.

Ryan Schmitt
  • Thesis: "'The New World Information and Communications Order': Revisiting the International Debate over Global Media" (completed 2018)
  • Current position: Ph.D. student in History at the University of Illinois
Jacob Orr
  • Thesis: "'Where our house was I found only trees': Colonial Development and Shared Memory in the Village of Itulike, Tanzania" (completed 2016)
  • Current position: Government of Canada, Public Services and Procurement
Mitchell Edwards
  • Thesis: "Construction of National Narratives Amongst Rwandan Diasporic Communities, pre-1990" (completed 2015)
  • Current position: Ph.D. student in History at Northwestern University
Emma Park
  • Thesis: "The Routes of Rule: The Role of Roads in Kenyan Governance and Popular Evaluations of 'Development' and Authority, 1890s – 1992"(Winner of the 2014 E.E. McCullough Prize for Best M.A. Thesis or Original Essay) [completed 2013]
  • Current position: Assistant Professor of History at the New School for Social Research (following a Ph.D. at the University of Michigan)
Kristin Biefer
  • Original Essay: "Narrating the Murder of Gugu Dlamini: Crime, Gender, Stigma, and 'South Africa’s First AIDS Martyr'" (completed 2010)
Mdelwa Mehlo
  • Thesis: "Decentering the Debate of Soweto: Local Communal Factors and the Outbreak of the Soweto Uprising" (completed 2009)
Paul Hebert
  • Thesis: "'Feed the World': Food, Development, Aid, and Hunger in Africa, 1984-85" (completed 2008)
  • Current position: Ph.D. recently completed, University of Michigan

Courses Taught

Undergraduate:

  • Introduction to African History

  • 20th Century Global History

  • 20th Century Africa

  • Nationalism in Africa

  • African Popular Culture

  • The Philosophy and Practice of History

  • Transnational Networks in Modern Times

  • Culture and the State in Colonial and Postcolonial Africa

  • Globalization and Culture

  • Colonial and Postcolonial Histories Via the Novel

Graduate:

  • Transnational Networks in Modern Times

  • Culture and the State in Colonial and Postcolonial Africa

  • Globalization and Culture

  • Colonial and Postcolonial Histories Via the Novel

  • Historical Theories and Methods

Back to top

© Concordia University