Skip to main content
LATEST INFORMATION ABOUT COVID-19

READ MORE

Lorraine O'Donnell, PhD

Affiliate Assistant Professor, School of Community and Public Affairs
Coordinator-researcher, Quebec English-Speaking Communities Research Network (QUESCREN), School of Community and Public Affairs


Lorraine  O'Donnell, PhD
© Marc Bourcier
Office: L-CC 219-1 
Central Building,
7141 Sherbrooke W.
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 4315
Email: Lorraine.ODonnell@concordia.ca
Website(s): Quebec English-Speaking Communities Research Network (QUESCREN)

Lorraine O’Donnell has a Ph.D. in History (McGill University), a Master's in History (York University), and a Graduate Diploma in Community Economic Development (Concordia University). She has over three decades of experience as a professional researcher, instructor, project coordinator and consultant. Since 2008, Lorraine has been the Coordinator-Researcher of the Quebec English-Speaking Community Research Network (QUESCREN). In 2015, she became an Affiliate Assistant Professor with Concordia University’s School of Community and Public Affairs.

In addition to her work at QUESCREN, Lorraine continues to carry out independent research and knowledge mobilization activities. Her focus is on history and heritage projects that involve and help build communities and social groups. To this end, she has been project manager, researcher and/or curator for Quebec history exhibits on immigration; Jewish and Irish communities; social movements; and English-speaking housewives during World War II. 


Publications

O'DONNELL, Lorraine, Brian Lewis, and Patrick Donovan, co-editors (2021; forthcoming). The Charter: Bill 101 and Quebec’s English-speaking communities / La Charte. La loi 101 et les québécois d’expression anglaise. Quebec City: Presses de l’Université Laval.



Cooper,Celine, Patrick Donovan and Lorraine O'DONNELL (2019). “Employment of English Speakers in Quebec’s Public Service: A background study.” QUESCREN Working Paper no. 1. (Available in French at this link.)



O’DONNELL, Lorraine (2016). “Housoldiers: The mobilization of Quebec housewives for World War II.” Quebec Heritage News 10, 4, Fall 2016.



O’DONNELL, Lorraine (2016). “‘Bloodshed and Broken Hearts’: The Battle of Hong Kong on the Quebec City Home Front.” Society Pages [magazine of the Literary and Historical Society of Quebec] 48, Spring 2016.



O'DONNELL,Lorraine (2011, 2012, 2013). Guest co-editor of special issues of Journal of Eastern Townships Studies. They were the proceedings of three annual conferences co-organized by QUESCREN and held at Association francophone pour le savoir (Acfas) congresses.



O’DONNELL, Lorraine (2013). “La diversité, la pauvreté et le capital historique et social des communautés d’expression anglaise du Québec,” in Michèle VATZ LAAROUSSI, Estelle BERNIER and Lucille GUILBERT (dir), Les collectivités locales au coeur de l’intégration des immigrants.Questions identitaires et stratégies régionales. Quebec: Presses de l’Université Laval.



Urtnowski, Karen, Lorraine O'DONNELL, Eric Shragge,Anne Robineau and Éric Forgues (2012). “Immigration, Settlement and Integration in Quebec’s Anglophone Communities: A preliminary Report.” Revue d’études des Cantons-de-l’Est / Journal of Eastern Townships Studies 38: 7-32.



Zanazanian, Paul et Lorraine O'DONNELL (2012). “Quelle place pour les anglophones dans le grand récit collectif des Québécois? Rapport d’une journée d’étude.” Enjeux de l’univers social: 8,1.



O'DONNELL, Lorraine (2010). “The Historical Diversity of English-Speaking Quebec as a public project: a preliminary strategic analysis.” Canadian Diversity / Diversité canadienne 8, 2 (Spring 2010): 33-37.



O'DONNELL, Lorraine. "Le voyage virtuel : les consommatrices, le monde de l'étranger et Eaton à Montreal, 1880-1980.Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française 58, 4 (2005): 535-568



O'DONNELL,Lorraine (2009-present [ongoing]). Co-production of an online bibliography of sources for the study of English-speaking Quebec. © Brendan O’Donnell and supported by QUESCREN.    


Research Team Membership

Back to top Back to top

© Concordia University