Concordia University

https://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/artsci/psychology/faculty.html

Roberto G. de Almeida, PhD

Associate Professor, Psychology

__ https://psycholinguistics.weebly.com __


Office: L-SP 245-01 
Richard J. Renaud Science Complex,
7141 Sherbrooke W.
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 2232
Email: roberto.dealmeida@concordia.ca
Website(s): CV
Psycholinguistics & Cognition Lab

Education

PhD (Rutgers University, Department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive Science)

Research interests

My interests are in cognitive science, and in particular on the nature of mental representations (i.e., how the mind/brain represents information; more specifically, semantic or conceptual representations), psycholinguistics (mostly on verbs and their role in sentence  comprehension) and interfaces between linguistic and conceptual systems, and between language and vision. My empirical and theoretical research investigates more specific issues within these areas, involving diverse methods and populations. (see web page for details)


Selected publications

[see up-to-date information at the Psycholinguistics & Cognition Lab site]

Books

Journal Articles / Chapters

  • Ashby, J., Roncero, C., de Almeida, R. G., & Agauas, S. (2018). The early processing of metaphors and similes: evidence from eye movements. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology71 (1), 161-168. [link to article]

  • de Almeida, R. G. (2018). Composing meaning and thinking. In G. Preyer (Ed.). Beyond Semantics and Pragmatics. Oxford University Press. [link to chapter]

  • de Almeida, R. G. & Lepore, E. (2018). Semantics for a module [link to chapter]

  • de Almeida, R. G. (2018). A Fodor's guide to Cognitive Science. [link to chapter]

  • de Almeida, R. G. & Antal, C. (2018, in press) How can semantics avoid the troubles with the analytic/synthetic distinction? [draft: request]

  • de Almeida, R. G., Riven, L., Manouilidou, C., Lungu, O., Dwivedi, V., Jarema, G., & Gillon, B. (2016). The neuronal correlates of indeterminate sentence interpretation: an fMRI study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10: 614.  [link to article]

  • Roncero, C., de Almeida, R. G., Martin, D., & de Caro, M. (2016). Aptness predicts metaphor preference in the lab and on the Internet.   Metaphor & Symbol, 31, 31-46. [link to article] 

  • de Almeida, R. G. & Manouilidou, C. (2015). The study of verbs in cognitive science. In R. G. de Almeida & C. Manouilidou (Eds.), Cognitive Science Perspectives on Verb Representation and Processing. New York: Springer. [link to article

  • Roncero, C., & de Almeida, R. G. (2014). The importance of being apt: Metaphor comprehension in Alzheimer's disease. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8  [link to article]

  • Manouilidou, C. & de Almeida, R. G. (2013). Processing correlates of verb typologies: Investigating internal strucutre and argument realization. Linguistics, 51, 767-792. [uncorrected proofs | .pdf]

  • de Almeida, R. G. & Riven, L. (2012). Indeterminacy and coercion effects: Minimal representations with pragmatic enrichment. In A. M. Di Sciullo (Ed.). Towards a biolinguistic understanding of grammar. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. [uncorrected proofs | .pdf]

  • Manouilidou, C., de Almeida, R. G., Schwartz, G., & Nair, N. P. V. (2009). Thematic roles in Alzheimer’s disease: Hierarchy violations in psychological predicates. Journal of Neurolinguistics, 22, 167-186. [uncorrected proofs | .pdf]

  • de Almeida, R. G. & Libben, G. (2005). Changing morphological structures: The effect of sentence context on the interpretation of structurally ambiguous English trimorphemic words. Language and Cognitive Processes, 20, 373-394. [Reprinted in: R. Frost, J. Grainger & K. Rastle (Eds.) Current Issues in Morphological Processing. London: Psychology Press] [.pdf]

  • de Almeida, R. G. (2004). The effect of context on the processing of type-shifting verbs. Brain and Language, 90, 249-261.[.pdf]

  • de Almeida, R. G. (1999). What do category-specific semantic deficits tell us about the representation of lexical concepts? Brain and Language, 68, 241-248. [.pdf]

Back to top

© Concordia University