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Master of Science in Management (MSc)

Course descriptions

Required courses

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

The need to understand and interpret data is of increasing importance to managers, executives, and entrepreneurs. The goal of this course is to develop skills in applied data analysis for business decision making-there are questions in the world that we want answers to, so we design studies to collect and then analyze inherently noisy data to answer those questions. The emphasis is applied and computational, with mathematical concepts presented when needed. The course covers the most important statistical methods in micro-level management research: 1. Linear regression problems, 2. Generalized linear modelling, 3. Measurement, data reduction, and causal modelling, 4. Design and analysis of experiments, 5. Bayesian approaches.

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

This seminar provides a basic understanding of the research process and a knowledge of the methods used in the design and execution of scientific research relevant to social sciences, and specifically the business context. The seminar helps students to develop skills needed to assess the feasibility and potential contribution of proposed studies, and to critically evaluate research reported by others. The application of relevant research methods are reviewed through discussions of exemplary articles published in leading journals. Cornerstone topics in this seminar include: theory construction, measurement, overview of data collection methods, reliability, as well as internal and external validity issues.

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

This course focuses on the management consulting profession and process. The course is structured around three parallel streams and provides important concepts and ideas for the tool-kit of the management consultant involved in analytical as well as change implementation projects. The first stream of the course examines the consulting process, i.e. the five phases of a consulting project from entry to termination. The second stream focuses on core consulting skills, i.e. the skills required to operate and succeed as a management consultant. These skills are essential for any type of consulting engagement, whether one works as an external or internal consultant, and whether the client in a private sector, public, or non-profit organization. The third stream is a real world consulting project that students conduct in teams with a client firm in order to apply the tools and skills discussed in class. The course concludes by reflecting on the role of internal consultants and management consulting as a career choice.

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

Students are required to attend a minimum of three professional development workshops approved by the Graduate Program Director and offered in collaboration with different partners (e.g. GradProSkills). These workshops complement students' academic training and provide them with technical skills that help them succeed professionally and academically. Component(s): Workshop

Prerequisites & notes

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Permission of the Graduate Program Director is required

This course is assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

This course provides students with a basis for understanding and critically examining how to manage individuals in an organizational context. Key concepts include aspects of organizational behaviour such as leadership, motivation, work attitudes and group dynamics. Concepts central to human resource management are also addressed-individual differences and diversity, recruitment, selection, training, organizational rewards and strategic human resource management. The course introduces the current work of scholars in these areas, with reference to the classical roots of their research.

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

This course introduces students to advanced topics and current debates in entrepreneurship, strategic management and organization theories. First, it examines core theories and concepts of entrepreneurship and strategic management that enable entrepreneurs/managers to create new businesses and sustain competitive advantage for firms. Second, it explores how organizations manage change in their environment by examining organizational structure, inter-organizational relationships, and institutional environment. This course provides students with a basis for understanding and critically examining complex organizations in the contemporary society.

Offered by:
Program: MSc

The MSc thesis requirement is intended to provide candidates with an opportunity to carry out an investigation in depth in a particular area of interest and to make a contribution to knowledge in the area. It is expected that the thesis will include a comprehensive and critical synthesis of the relevant literature and will also embody either a theoretical contribution to knowledge, a rigorous empirical investigation or both. A Thesis Committee consists of a faculty member as Supervisor and two other faculty members. An Examining Committee consists of the Thesis Committee and a Thesis Examination Chair appointed by the School’s MSc Director in accordance with the thesis regulations specified in the graduate calendar.


Electives (specialized seminars)

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

This seminar is the first of three seminars that together provide an in depth understanding of the modern practice of personnel and human resource management. This seminar will provide the analytical and conceptual tools needed to effectively staff organizations with qualified employees. The main areas of coverage include: strategic human resource planning, task and job analysis, and the recruitment, selection and placement of qualified applicants. In addressing these topics, attention will focus on techniques for developing valid and reliable predictors of employee effectiveness which address both the strategic needs of the organization and the legal and employment equity requirements of contemporary Quebec and Canadian organizations.

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

Provides knowledge of human motivation and compensation systems as they affect organizational processes and behavior. Emphasis will be on major theories of human motivation and on the relation between motivational processes and personal and organizational outcomes. The effects of evaluation, compensation and reward systems on motivation will also be discussed.

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

This course adopts the interactional framework of leadership, which considers that the leadership process is a function of three components: the leader, the followers, and the context. The course is structured to cover classic and emergent theories that address each of these components; though most theories focus on one of these three components, they also inform the other components in the model, either implicitly or explicitly. Implications for the practice of leadership are addressed through class discussions. An effort is made to ensure that students do not adopt a myopic view of leadership. Rather, different perspectives on the process of leadership are presented, that make radically different assumptions. Students are therefore required to identify these assumptions and develop well-articulated arguments that either support or refute these assumptions in order to develop a sophisticated view of leadership. Component(s): Seminar

Prerequisites & notes

Students who have received credit for this topic under a MSCA 652 number may not take this course for credit.

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

This seminar is designed to introduce students to the key concepts and important areas of research related to globalization, multinational corporate strategies, and organizations and management systems in both developed and developing countries. We start with an overview of international management and multinational enterprise theories followed by a discussion on important methodological issues for doing research in an international context. The impacts of national culture and national institutions of different countries on today’s global business environment are discussed as well. Specific areas such as internationalization of small and medium-sized enterprises, entry modes, international joint ventures, and management practices are covered. The seminar concludes by discussing future research trends in this field. A key goal is to articulate appropriate research questions, develop theoretical frameworks, design empirical strategies, and to write an academic paper using key components from this seminar. Component(s): Seminar

Prerequisites & notes

Students who have received credit for this topic under a MSCA 652 number may not take this course for credit.

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

This course provides an overview of the diverse manifestations of contemporary entrepreneurship research. We review and critically evaluate the study of entrepreneurship across the contexts of new venture creation, family, social, sustainable, corporate, bottom of the pyramid and others. We cross levels of analysis—from individual to family, to firm, to network, to industry—and theoretical traditions. There is a strong emphasis on critical reasoning, empirical scrutiny and theoretical development. Students develop competencies in all aspects of the entrepreneurship research process, culminating with their own independent contributions to the field through a novel research paper. Component(s): Seminar

Prerequisites & notes

Students who have received credit for this topic under a MSCA 652 number may not take this course for credit.

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

More than one topic can be offered under this course. In such cases, the name of the topic will be indicated on the class schedule under Topic.

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

This seminar is designed to present and discuss important developments in the field of strategy and organization theory. An in-depth knowledge of key topics such as corporate social responsibility, internationalization, entrepreneurship, family business, non-market strategies, networks, and other aspects of business management are the focus. Students are expected to demonstrate mastery of relevant concepts, theories, and empirical findings in strategy. By critiquing the variety of research designs and measures used to study a given concept, and by analyzing the contexts in which recent studies have been conducted, students acquire an ability to propose research of conceptual and practical significance. Component(s): Seminar

Prerequisites & notes

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MSCA 657.

If prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the instructor is required.

Offered by: Management
Program: MSc

This seminar is designed to present and discuss important developments in the field of organizational behaviour. An in-depth knowledge of key topics such as teamwork, employee health, the work-life interface, leadership, decision making, and other aspects of workplace relationships are the focus. Students are expected to demonstrate mastery of relevant concepts, theories, and empirical findings in organizational behaviour. By critiquing the variety of research designs and measures used to study a given concept, and by analyzing the contexts in which recent studies have been conducted, students develop the ability to propose research of conceptual and practical significance.

Prerequisites & notes

Prerequisite/Corequisite: The following course must be completed previously: MSCA 656.

If the prerequisites are not satisfied, permission of the instructor is required.


*Please note that all course listing on this page is subject to change and that the content of the seminars may vary from a year to another. Current students should consult the graduate calendar or refer to their program team at msc.jmsb@concordia.ca for the most updated information. 

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