Now's the time to manage your time

October 4, 2021
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person looking at a watch

Time is not on your side. No matter what you seem to do, there's never enough of it. Just getting through your emails seems like a daunting task. Not to mention the meetings, phone calls, reports, homework, kids, gym, shopping, oh yeah, and sleep. If you don't manage it properly, you'll feel like most people: overwhelmed. Don't panic. Take a deep breath and consider these tips from management consultant and CCE's workshop trainer Sophie Lemieux.

  • Analyze and plan better

Go back over everything you did last week. How much time was really productive? How much time was wasted on social media or other activities? What could you change in the week ahead? Keep in mind that 1 hour of planning saves 4 hours.

  • Budget

Just like with money, we often underestimate how much time it will take to get certain tasks done. Budget a realistic amount of time to each task and do your best to stay within it. Don’t forget to include sleeping time. Funny how we tend to have too much in one day!

  • Prioritize

Some things absolutely have to get done. Put them at the top of your list. What can be left until next week or next month? Put those at the bottom. In the middle, make time for the tasks that don't need doing right away but can't be left for long. To help you, ask yourself if the activity has a direct impact on the achievement of your end goal. Remember that 80% of our results are generated by 20% of our activities.

  • Add value

More time doesn't necessarily add up to more value. Take a look at what you're doing and ask yourself if it's really adding value to your work. If it's not, cut it out. Focus on making the most of your time and effort.

Time management skills help you manage your time efficiently and take charge of your personal and professional life. It’s not always easy and takes patience, but we are here to help. Learn the best practices in our online workshop with a real pro. 

Hurry! The workshop is on November 2nd and places are limited. 



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