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Changes in habitat amount, fragmentation, and connectivity in the Adirondacks to Laurentians (A2L) transboundary wildlife linkage

Implications for conservation and restoration policy and practice

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Researchers: Jonathan Cole and Jochen Jaeger

Highlights:

  • The Adirondack–Laurentian ecological corridor is a critical movement linkage for wildlife.
  • This region boasts a wide variety of habitats that still maintain a high degree of ecological integrity and are rich in biodiversity.
  • Population growth over the past 50 years has caused a rise in development putting the area under increased risk of habitat loss and landscape fragmentation.
  • This project involves measuring changes in habitat amount, fragmentation, and connectivity in the Adirondacks to Laurentians (A2L) transboundary wildlife linkage from 1992 to 2018.
  • This work is conducted at three spatial scales (study area, provincial/state portion, MRC)/county) using six species (eastern wolf, black bear, fisher, moose, white-tailed deer and porcupine).
  • The purpose of his research is to locate priority areas for protection and ecological restoration as well as pin-point optimal sites for the placement of wildlife crossing structures and fencing.
  • Another aspect of this research involves the establishment of optimal configurations for wildlife crossing structures and fencing to reduce animal-vehicle collisions and increase species connectivity.
 
Publications in progress
  • Cole, J.R., Kross, A., Jaeger, J.A.G. (subm.): Changes in landscape structure in the Adirondack to Laurentians (A2L) transboundary wildlife linkage from 1992-2018: A call for stronger local conservation and restoration measures. Submitted to Landscape Ecology.
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