Concordia University

https://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/artsci/psychology/student-life/alumni/martin-storey.html

Alexa Martin-Storey

2011, PhD Psychology (Research Training Option) (Supervisor: Lisa Serbin)
2006, MA Psychology (Supervisor: Lisa Serbin)

Assistant Professor (Département de Psychoéducation at the Université de Sherbrooke)

Alexa Martin-Storey

1.     How are you applying your degree in Psychology from Concordia?

I teach courses on research methods, child development and developmental psychopathology, all of which are grounded in the training I received at Concordia University. My research programme is also strongly influenced by my experiences at Concordia, both in terms of my methodological and theoretical approaches. More recently, I was named the Tier-II Canada Research Chair in Stigma and Psychosocial Development, which has allowed me to continue a research programme started during my doctorate.

2.     What do you value most from your experience in the Psychology program?

The flexibility my supervisor, Lisa Serbin, gave me to participate in multiple projects in my own lab, as well as in other research groups. The support I received in pursuing these projects exposed me to a variety of research methods, and were the start of many of my ongoing collaborations.

3.     Is there a particular memory that stands out from your time at Concordia?

I was lucky to be in the same cohort as a group of other students who were really interested in developmental psychology. Most of my best memories are of conversations we would have about speakers and our projects.

4.     What advice would you give to someone considering graduate studies in a Psychology program?  

While your thesis is important, it is also valuable to get involved in side projects and, when possible, work with other researchers. Give yourself the opportunity to know more than just what is going on in your lab. Write papers with your friends and take advantage of the different kinds of research going on in the department.

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