A strategic vision for the future

As Concordia embarked on a mixed return to campus, many things about the teaching and learning landscape had changed markedly. In order to adequately plan the future of investments in technologies, spaces and people — both in terms of faculty engagement in questions of pedagogy and in terms of student outcomes in learning —we need a strategic plan for teaching and learning.

Concordia is building a vision for the future through guided conversations in early 2022 about what it means to teach and learn in a way that emphasizes:

  • inclusivity, by creating equitable, welcoming and respectful learning environments 
  • success and wellbeing, by taking a holistic approach to mental health and academic success 
  • technology, by making the best possible use of educational tech to enhance learning 
  • "sky is the limit" thinking, to leave room for even the most boldly ambitious approaches

A collective responsibility

Teaching and learning at any institution of higher education is a collective responsibility. Its success can be measured in tangible outcomes:

  • retention and inclusion rates
  • student outcomes in courses
  • impacts on lifelong achievements and prosperity
  • career success and more

As Concordia embarks on a mixed return to campus, many things about the teaching and learning landscape have changed markedly.

In order to adequately plan the future of investments in technologies, spaces, and human capital – both in terms of faculty engagement in questions of pedagogy and in terms of student outcomes in learning – a Strategic Plan for teaching and learning is needed.

To inform this Strategic Plan, we want to collect information from our community, educational research companies, and other institutions.  In the winter 2021 term, EAB gave two presentations on emerging trends in teaching and learning.  This presentation is available to download below.  EAB is an educational technology and research company headquartered in Washington, D.C. that shares its insights and expertise with more than 1,700 institutions globally.

Leadership team

The Advisory Committee on Teaching and Learning (ACTL) oversees this federated approach to building the plan.

This group, known as the ACTL Leads, is comprised of associate deans from the four faculties, the School of Graduate Studies, and representatives from the two student unions. Each of these members, in turn, are leading their own committees at the local level.

The sponsor of the project is the Vice-Provost, Innovation in Teaching and Learning, who is also the chair of ACTL. The committee is comprised of eight members, with a staff liaison.

The ACTL believes a fulsome approach to consultations at this early stage will be essential for the change management that will be necessary in the enactment of the plan.

ACTL leadership team

  • Sandra Gabriele, ACTL chair, Vice-Provost, Innovation in Teaching and Learning
  • Ali Akgunduz, Associate Dean, Academic Programs, Gina Cody School of Engineering and Computer Science
  • Sandra Betton, Associate Dean, Professional Graduate Programs, John Molson School of Business
  • Rachel Berger, Associate Dean, Academic Programs and Development, School of Graduate Studies
  • Philippe Caignon, Associate Dean, Student Academic Services, Faculty of Arts and Science
  • Elaine Cheasley Paterson, Associate Dean, Academic Affairs, Faculty of Fine Arts
  • Hannah Jamet-Lange, Coordinator, Academic and Advocacy, Concordia Student Union
  • Lourdu Reddy Allam, Vice-President, Academics and Advocacy, Graduate Students' Association

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