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Goose Village Artist Talk by Marisa Portolese-moderated by Dr.Cynthia Hammond

September 24, 2021

COHDS

SEP 28, 14:00-16:00 (online)

Registration:  https://concordia-ca.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZYrde-urzwqHNWjzybPsczZZzgkDuHgYQyD

The Goose Village Project: Photography, Research-Creation, and Oral History, with Marisa Portolese. Moderated by Dr Cynthia Hammond. In English. 

Marisa Portolese is Canadian-Italian and was born in Montreal, Quebec. She is an Associate Professor in the Photography Program in the Faculty of Fine Arts, at Concordia University. Portraiture, representations of women, narrative, autobiography, the figure in nature, cultural heritage and immigration are major and recurrent subjects in her practice. She often produces large-scale color photographs, rich in painterly references that concentrate on elucidating facets of human experiences in relation to psychological and physical environments, relating to larger themes concerning identity and spectatorship. She attempts to weave together gesture, affect, and the nuances of the gaze, to create an immersive and emotional landscape for the viewer. Her current research focuses on the cultural legacy of the Goose Village and how the hallmark event of Expo 67 caused the demolition of this working-class neighbourhood and displaced an entire community mostly made up Irish and Italian immigrants that included her parents. 

www.marisaportolese.com  

https://goosevillage.ca  

Dr Cynthia Hammond is Professor of Art History at Concordia University and a core affiliate of COHDS. She is a practicing artist and scholar, whose research and creation emphasize living memories and situated knowledge of the city, especially the knowledge of women and older citizens. She is presently leading a three-year Partnership Development Grant project titled “La ville extraordinaire: Learning from older Montrealers’ urban knowledge through oral history research-creation.”

https://concordia.academia.edu/CynthiaHammond  

https://cynthiahammond.org  

 

 



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