Arts & culture

Winter Storytelling Series featuring Indigenous Storytellers

Hosted by the First Peoples Studies program

DATE & TIME
Thursday, January 27, 2022
7 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Other dates

Thursday, January 27, 2022
Wednesday, February 2, 2022
Tuesday, February 8, 2022

SPEAKER(S)

George R. Kennedy, (ABD), Oneida Nation, Turtle Clan, McGill University; Richard Wesley, Traditional Ecological Knowledge Keeper, Constance Lake Anishinaabe; Emilio Wawatie, Storyteller, Barrier Lake & Kitigan Zibi Algonquin-Anishnabe

COST

This event is free

ORGANIZATION

First Peoples Studies, SCPA, Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling

WHERE

Online

Mosaic of three photos featuring the event speakers, first with Richard Wesley, Traditional Ecological Knowledge Keeper, Constance Lake Anishinaabe. He is wearing a fur cap, glasses, orange jacket and black overalls and stands in the winter woods; Emilio Wawatie, Storyteller, Barrier Lake & Kitigan Zibi Algonquin-Anishnabe. He is wearing a black t-shirt, black glasses, and smiles at the camera in front of a white wall with two paintings behind him. ; George R. Kennedy, (ABD), Oneida Nation, Turtle Clan, McGill University is in profile and wears a feather headdress, sunglasses and a blue shirt.

The First Peoples Studies program in the School of Community and Public Affairs (SCPA) is honoured to host the Winter Storytelling Series featuring Indigenous Storytellers sharing knowledge foundational to understanding our roles and responsibilities as Human Beings.

Historically, winter was the season when certain stories could be told. Basil Johnson described the Manitous “as realities [from] other than the physical ones… to the unseen realities… that are beyond human understanding but are still clearly real” (2001, xxi-xxii).

These powerful and unseen Beings care for the planet and inform all Human Beings about our responsibilities to the physical and unseen world. It is because the earth sleeps under a blanket of protective snow that we can tell these stories about the natural world. Storytellers seek to offer an opportunity for people to connect with a First Peoples’ perspective of the world by listening to their winter stories to reconstitute balance and harmony in these uncertain times.

This is a safe space to experience the power of the Indigenous Oral Tradition under the authority of these Indigenous Storytellers. All are welcome.

See below for individual events in the series which includes more information about the storytellers and links to the Zoom meetings.

Financial support from the Faculty of Arts and Science.

 


All dates in this series:

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