Theme 1.1: Didactique/Curriculum and Pedagogy


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Research conducted under this theme helps deepen and widen scientific knowledge about the processes for teaching and learning specific subject matter content. This research is also crucial for policy makers, informing them in building educational frameworks such as MELS curricula and “Progressions des apprentissages.”

Projects

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Comparing Classroom Instructional Approaches

Dr. Bernard is the leader of the CSLP Systematic Review Team. In a recent IDRC-funded research project entitled, Meta-Analysis of Studies Comparing Classroom Instruction to Online Learning, Blended Learning, and Flipped Classrooms for Pre-service and In-service Teachers, Bernard and co-investigator, Richard Schmid, analyzed the experimental research literature of online (OL), blended learning (BL), and flipped classroom (FC) instructional approaches that were used to educate pre-service and practicing teachers to discover the variables that affect what works or doesn't work in the classroom, and why. The results showed that technology-based approaches, especially BL, are conducive to creating a participatory and stimulating classroom atmosphere. These approaches also respond to specific needs, particularly access, diversity, and inclusivity. In addition, though this project was a scoping review of technology supported teacher education as a response to the COVID-19 pandemic, these approaches, or some iteration of online learning, are likely to become the new status quo. As such, educators and policymakers can turn to Bernard’s research for a comprehensive understanding of best practices regarding online instructional strategies and delivery methods. Future research will be focused on whether comparable outcomes can be found in the Global South where there are different educational and social realities.

ResearcherDr. Robert Bernard

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Comparing Classroom Instructional Approaches

As an extension of the above research concern, Dr. Schmid collaborated on an IDRC-funded research project entitled, Meta-Analysis of Studies Comparing Classroom Instruction to Online Learning, Blended Learning, and Flipped Classrooms for Pre-service and In-service Teachers. Schmid and co-investigator Robert Bernard, analyzed the experimental research literature of online (OL), blended learning (BL), and flipped classroom (FC) instructional approaches that were used to educate pre-service and practicing teachers to discover the variables that affect what works or doesn't work in the classroom, and why. The results showed that technology-based approaches, especially BL, are conducive to creating a participatory and stimulating classroom atmosphere. These approaches also respond to specific needs, particularly access, diversity, and inclusivity. Future research will be focused on whether comparable outcomes can be found in the Global South where there are different educational and social realities.

ResearcherDr. Richard Schmid

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Construction of scientific identity through authentic project involvement

Dr. Chastenay's project is conducted within the context of a study by Sherbrooke University researchers on the effect of light pollution on human health. This study has employed college-level students over its 20 years of existence. Through qualitative questionnaires and semi-structured interviews, this project aims to gauge how current students’ involvement in this real, practical study affects the construction of their scientific identity, i.e. how they perceive or how they feel others perceive them as a scientific person through different themes such as their sense of competence, their motivation in executing tasks, or how they utilise the resources at their disposal. Dr. Chastenay also hopes to have people who participated in the study as college students in the past tell him how the experience informed their scientific identity and career decisions. This project fits well with Dr. Chastenay’s passion for having students engage with science like scientists do, and learning in real, natural settings.

ResearcherPierre Chastenay

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Learning assessment and engagement

This project, lead by Dr. Barroso Da Costa, analyses the contributions of assessment practices on the surface and deep learning approaches adopted by university students. Specifically, the study seeks to test the extent to which assessment methods, as well as the frequency, quality, and usefulness of feedback, can explain students' adherence to a particular learning approach. Among the findings is the contribution of feedback frequency in explaining the deep learning approach.

ResearcherDr. Carla Barroso Da Costa

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Mobile Technologies for Students with ADHD

Dr. Fichten's research project looks directly at students with ADHD’s current and future use of mobile device technology. Keeping in line with one of Fichten’s research goals to provide students with disabilities access to tools that can help them succeed in their educational endeavours, this project has compiled comprehensive lists of apps that students with ADHD use, but perhaps more importantly, which ones they like. The lists can be found in the document entitled What apps do students with ADHD and nondisabled students use and like? The FRQSC funds this project.

ResearcherDr. Catherine Fichten

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Plurilingual Shift in Language Teaching

Plurilingual Shift in Language Teaching is a research project created by Dr. Galante that examines in-service and pre-service teachers’ perceptions of a plurilingual approach to language learning to help teachers navigate and be better prepared in their teaching practice. Plurilingualism is an approach that validates learners as they come and views their existing language(s) and cultural references as assets to the language classroom. After closely monitoring and comparing a monolingual approach to a plurilingual approach, Galante’s article Affordances of plurilingual instruction in higher education: A mixed methods study with a quasi experiment in an English language program reveals the unique affordances of a plurilingual approach, such as the development of empathy when speaking with people from other cultures and the recognition that many cultures may inform one’s identity.

Galante’s research objectives are to impact the way language research is done and influence pedagogical approaches to be more inclusive. As such, Galante developed the Plurilingual and Pluricultural Competence (PPC) scale, a research tool that can be used to gather quantitative data about language instruction and learning.

ResearcherDr. Angelica Galante

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The contribution of morphological awareness in reading comprehension

This project, lead by Dr. Fejzo, aims to verify if morphological awareness plays a role in reading comprehension for francophone students in 4th to 6th grade of elementary school. The research team developed and validated tests on morphological awareness (e.g., completing a sentence with a derived word), morphological analysis (e.g., deducing the meaning of a derived word). As well, they measure reading comprehension and other control variables by using international, standardized measures.

Researcher: Dr. Anila Fejzo

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