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https://www.concordia.ca/content/shared/en/news/main/releases/2010/10/13/artist-presents-his-third-ear-created-through-surgery-and-stem-cells.html

Artist presents his third ear, created through surgery and stem-cells

MONTREAL/October 13, 2010--

Concordia researchers collaborate with internationally renowned artist Stelarc

Science and art collide in the work of Australian artist Stelarc whose latest creation will be unveiled to the public October 21 at Concordia University in Montreal. Stelarc is known for using prosthetics, robotics and biotechnology to explore ways of redesigning the human body. His latest experiment involves growing an extra ear on his arm through stem cells and surgical reconstruction. Stelarc's "Ear in Arm" is internet-enabled to function as an acoustical organ to transmit sound to people in other places.

Public vernissage

October 21 - 4:30 to 6:15pm
The Media Gallery
Communications and Journalism (CJ) building room 1.419

Loyola Campus - 7141 Sherbrooke St. West

Public Lecture

October 21 - 6:30 to 8pm
Oscar Peterson Hall

Loyola Campus - 7141 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal

Following the public unveiling, Stelarc will be involved in a week-long series of workshops with researchers from Concordia and other Montreal universities. Researchers and students from the University of Windsor will also be involved in creating prototypes through the workshop process.

Stelarc's visit to Concordia is organized by Fluxmedia, a network of Concordia artists and scholars engaged in interdisciplinary research.

Stelarc is chair in Performance Arts at Brunel University West London and Senior Research Fellow in the MARCS Auditory Labs at the University of Western Sydney. He was awarded the Hybrid Arts prize at Ars Electronica earlier this year and has a Special Projects Grant by the Australia Council, that country's arts funding organization.

On the web:

Concordia Department of Communication Studies

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