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Workshops & seminars

Rethinking imposter syndrome

Date & time
Wednesday, March 10, 2021
3 p.m. – 4 p.m.

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Speaker(s)

Bibigi Haile, BA 08

Cost

This event is free

Organization

University Advancement

Where

Online

Wednesday, March 10, 2021

In this conversation, Bibigi Haile, BA 08 will help you unpack imposter syndrome and offer the knowledge, mindset shift and tools that you need to design a career and life based on what fulfills you.

A 1985 definition of impostor syndrome describes it as an “internal experience of intellectual phoniness” (…) in individuals who are highly successful but unable to internalize their success”

This workshop exists because every time I describe imposter syndrome, rooms full of women (and men) raise their hand in recognition. By some accounts 70% of all adults will experience impostor syndrome in their career at some point. The ubiquity of this syndrome is really surprising and concerning, yet few addresses it in depth.


Bibigi Haile, BA 08

Career and brand management coach, Speakeasy.work

Bibigi Haile

Bibigi Haile works with women in middle and senior management to help them make bold moves in their lives and careers as they discover the possibilities that come with finding and owning their unique voice

Prior to her coaching days, Bibigi spent 15+ years as an organizational development and change management consultant supporting senior leaders and executives to design and execute major change projects. She often found herself becoming a trusted advisor to her female clients, and quickly realized that in middle management roles, women could feel very lonely when it came to discussing their professional challenges. The realization of her client’s struggles led her to pivot her consultancy towards one focused on individual transformation and change.

Bibigi is also and especially the mother of a wise 5-year-old, a third culture kid, a podcast and book nerd and a running enthusiast.


This event is part of:

Alumni Matters: A graduation conference

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