Concordia University

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English literature

The study of literature written in English is the largest component of the English Department. Students develop skills in critical thinking, rhetorical analysis, and writing that are central to the "knowledge economy." Our students have gone on to careers in teaching, law, journalism, business, and advertising.

Students in the literature programs encounter the literatures of Great Britain and Ireland, Canada, the United States, and world literature written in English. They can also develop an interest in literary theory and models of literary interpretation relevant to fields such as philosophy, history, and anthropology.

The department regularly invites guest speakers. The annual Lahey Lecture features a speaker of international significance for literary studies. C.A.S.E. (Concordia Association for Students of English) also regularly sponsors events for undergraduates in the literature programs.

Program details

BA, English literature

You may complete a Bachelor of Arts in English Literature at three levels:

  • Major: the standard program in literature, giving students a grounding in the discipline and at the same time permitting them to pursue their own interests in an increasingly rich and diverse field of study.
  • Specialization: offering a comprehensive coverage of various areas of literature in English, but without the minimum grade requirements of Honours.
  • Honours: you must have a minimum GPA, with no grade lower than a C, and is often expected of students planning graduate studies in English Literature. Honours does not require an extra year of study, and can be completed within the minimum number of credits required for a BA.

You may combine the study of History and English Literature into one degree.

BA Joint Specialization in English and History

The Joint Specialization in English and History offers students the opportunity to study the two subjects in close parallel, and is often chosen as the academic preparation for a career in teaching.

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