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ANTH 270 - Library tips
for your assignments


Library Basics: do we have it or not?

If you simply want to access a specific article, book, book chapter or film, just search in the:

 

Literature Reviews: How-to & Examples

For general guidelines on how to write a literature review, including  a link to an example of an extensive literature review in a social sciences journal, see:


For examples of extensive and sophisticated literature reviews with a scholarly anthropological lens, see:


**NOTE:
  YOUR PROFESSOR'S INSTRUCTIONS TAKE PRECEDENCE OVER ANY GENERAL INFO GUIDES OR LIT REVIEW EXAMPLES ABOVE. 

 


Try these article databases to search for academic and anthropological articles in peer-reviewed journals:

USEFUL TIPS:

  • For Quick Tips on how to enter search terms in most of these databases, see this one-page SEARCH STRATEGIES CHEAT SHEET.
  • You can click on the Scholarly/Peer-reviewed journals checkbox in most of the databases above to ensure that the citations you choose are acceptable peer-reviewed articles. See also Evaluating Sources.

**FUN TIP:
If you have found an interesting citation that is not very recent, use the "Cited by" link available  in many databases (especially in Google Scholar) to find similar and more recent articles**


While your professor's instructions and assignment guidelines always come first, you might also find these guides from other university websites useful:


Option A: Article Databases

Search any of these anthropology article databases to find recent (2010-2021)  articles from reputable, peer-reviewed, Anthropology journals

**IMPORTANT TIPS:

  • Be sure to select full-length research articles, NOT book reviews, literature reviews, commentaries, news items, introductions, conclusions or editorials. See also Evaluating Sources below.
  • You can use Date Limits to ensure you search for articles published between 2010 and 2021.

You could also try:

**WARNING: It could be quite easy for you to get lost within these multidisciplinary tools and to find articles that are not relevant or appropriate. 


Option B: Journal Browse

Find your two peer-reviewed articles by:
  1. Selecting one of these anthopology journals: 
  2. Browsing our list of highly-ranked anthropology journals (according to Scimago rank)

**IMPORTANT TIPS:

  • Be sure to select full-length research articles, NOT book reviews, literature reviews, commentaries, news items, introductions, conclusions or editorials.
  • Be sure to choose recent issues of the relevant journals, between 2010 and now
  • Journal and publisher web sites can sometimes lead you astray to non-peer-reviewed articles. Make sure the article you choose is in the journal you wanted, and meets the criteria  discussed in class
  • You can also browse or search other journal titles that you might have come across, as long as they are peer-reviewed and reputable 
    • In our E-journals search box, enter the name of the journal
    • From the results list, simply click on one of the suggested links, as long as it covers the relevant date range.
    • You can then browse or search the journal and pick an article that relates to evolution and/or topics covered in your course from any issue published between 2010 and now

For your assignment you will need to find a current news article 
To find one you can search any of these news databases:  

  • Canadian Newsstream - includes Globe & Mail, Montreal Gazette
  • Eureka.cc - includes local Montreal papers, La Presse, Le Devoir, L'Actualité and international papers
  • Factiva - includes small and large Canadian newspapers as well as international

Additional context for a better understanding of your topics

To find additional material related to the issues or themes you have chosen for your assignments, you can use  the required, recommended and  selected assigned readings  in Course Outline, but you can also try more anthropology sources resources:

 


IS IT SCHOLARLY/ACADEMIC/PEER-REVIEWED?

Your professor's instructions should always be the first criteria in determining what qualifies as an appropriate academic source. If you feel you need additional guidance in this area, however, you might find some relevant tips in the guides below.
 

When evaluating the quality of a variety of material, the following library guide might provide some help:


Help Referencing: Bibliography & In-Text Citations

  • Your outline states that you must include full references and page notations (in-text citations) for the article you are analyzing and any other material you use.

  • The APA Citation & Style Guide can help. For example:

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