Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/research/neuroscience/faculty.html

Center for Studies in Behavioral Neurobiology

FRQS Groupe de recherche en neurobiologie comportementale

Center for Studies in Behavioral Neurobiology

FRQS Groupe de recherche en neurobiologie comportementale

David Mumby, PhD

Professor, Psychology

Office: L-SP 257-5 
Richard J. Renaud Science Complex,
7141 Sherbrooke W.
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 2233
Email: David.Mumby@concordia.ca
Website(s): David Mumby's blog

Research

The overarching mission of my lab is to contribute to the training and career development of new scientists --undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral research students pursuing careers in behavioural neuroscience research. Students who train here can master a wide variety of behavioural techniques and use them to explore the organization of behaviour systems, and the neural bases of learning and memory.

Our specific lines of research have covered a diverse range of topics in recent years, including:

- the roles of perirhinal cortex and hippocampus in mediating and modulating effects of estrogens on cognitive ability (Gervais et al., 2013; Gervais et al., 2014;Gervais et al., 2015; Gervais et al., 2016)

-memory reconsolidation, especially in the realms of fear-learning and object-recognition (in progress)

- entorhinal cortex damage and retrograde memory for spatial and non-spatial information (Gaskin et al., 2009; Gervais et al., 2014).

-demonstrating limitations of the existing methodologies for assessing object-recognition memory in rats (i.e., novelty-preference tests), and developing new and improved methods (Gaskin et al., 2010;  other work still in progress)

- functional interactions involving hippocampal damage, contextual information processing,and object-recognition memory (Piterkin et al., 2008; other work still in progress)

In addition to dedicated lines of inquiry pursued by students in the Mumby lab, we usually have one or more ongoing collaborations with researchers at other universities. This broadens the range of research topics and questions students can explore, and the range of analytical techniques they may encounter and learn. Our most recent collaborations (over the past two or three years) have included the following topics:

-hippocampal damage and circadian time-place learning (Cole et al., 2016)

-neuro-developmental correlates of spatial learning (Wartman et al., 2012; Comba et al., 2015)

-modulatory effects of environmental enrichment on behavioural and somatic responses to extrinsic stressors (Huzard et al., 2015)

-oxytocin effects on novelty-preference in female rats (Madularu  et al., 2014a) and in male prairie voles(Madularu et al., 2014b).

All behavioural data for these projects were collected in the Mumby lab (except for Madularu et al. 2014b). The diversity of our research topics sets us apart somewhat from the more typical, ultra-specialized behavioural-neuroscience labs. Doctoral students in my lab pursue research lines that are their own, not just a continuation of some previous research from my lab. With this approach I aim to help these early-career scientists establish themselves as independent researchers. While conducting research for their thesis or dissertation, students in my lab also contribute to other research projects, thus broadening their knowledge, experience, and publication records.

One reason we can conduct original research on such a range of topics, and publish in high-quality journals, is because we have tremendous lab facilities and other resources at our disposal. Our lab has ample space to accommodate the extensive array of apparatuses and other equipment we use in our experiments, and this enables us to have several experiments going on at the same time. As part of the Center for Studies in Behavioural Neurobiology, students in our lab have access to a broad selection of neurobiology research techniques and tools, as well as the expertise and potential training opportunities provided through our collaborations with other CSBN labs.

Keywords

integrity, objectivity, quality of data over quantity, emphasis on getting the interpretation right, mentoring for career success without selling out


Publications

Cole E, Mistlberger RE, Merza D, Trigiani LJ, Madularu D, SimundicA, Mumby DG. (2016). Circadian time-place (or time-route) learning in rats with hippocampal lesions. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, [PubMed]  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nlm.2016.09.004

Gervais NJ, Hamel LM, BrakeWG, Mumby DG (2016). Intra-perirhinal cortex administration of estradiol, but not an ER<beta> agonist,modulates object-recognition memory in ovariectomized rats. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, in press. [PubMed]

Comba R, Gervais N, Mumby D, Holahan M. (2015). Emergence of spatial behavioral function and associated mossy fiber connectivity and c-Fos labeling patterns in the hippocampus of rats. F1000Res, 4:396 [PubMed]

Huzard D, Mumby DG, Sandi C, Poirier GL, van der Kooij MA (2015). The effects of extrinsic stress on somatic markers and behavior are dependent on animal housing conditions. Physiology & Behavior, 151:238-245.  doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.07.018  [PubMed]

Gervais NJ, Mumby DG, Brake WG (2015). Attenuation of dendritic spine density in the perirhinal cortex following 17β-Estradiol replacement in the rat. Hippocampus, 25:212-1216. doi: 10.1002/hipo.22479 [PubMed]

Madularu D, Athanassiou M, Yee JR, Kenkel WM, Carter CS, Mumby DG (2014) Oxytocin and object preferences in the male prairie vole. Peptides. [PubMed] [Content]

Madularu D, Athanassiou M, Yee JR, Mumby DG (2014) Centrally-administered oxytocin promotes preference for familiar objects at a short delay in ovariectomized female rats. Behav Brain Res 274C:164-167. [PubMed] [Content]

Gervais NJ, Barrett-Bernstein M, Sutherland RJ, Mumby DG (2014) Retrograde and anterograde memory following selective damage to the dorsolateral entorhinal cortex. Neurobiol Learn Mem 116C:14-26. [PubMed] [Content]

Gervais NJ, Jacob S, Brake WG, Mumby DG (2014) Modulatory effect of 17-beta estradiol on performance of ovariectomized rats on the Shock-Probe test. Physiol Behav 131:129-135. [PubMed] [Content]

Gervais NJ, Jacob S, Brake WG, Mumby DG (2013) Systemic and intra-rhinal-cortical 17-beta estradiol administration modulate object-recognition memory in ovariectomized female rats. Horm Behav 64:642-652. [PubMed] [Content]

Wartman BC, Gervais NJ, Smith C, Comba R, Mumby DG, Holahan MR (2012) Enhanced adolescent learning and hippocampal axonal projections following preadolescent spatial exposure to a water or dry maze. Brain Res 1475:37-48. [PubMed] [Content]

Gaskin S, Tardif M, Mumby DG (2011) Prolonged inactivation of the hippocampus reveals temporally graded retrograde amnesia for unreinforced spatial learning in rats. Neurobiol Learn Mem 96:288-296. [PubMed] [Content]

Gaskin S, Tardif M, Cole E, Piterkin P, Kayello L, Mumby DG (2010) Object familiarization and novel-object preference in rats. Behav Processes 83:61-71. [PubMed] [Content]

Gaskin S, Tardif M, Mumby DG (2009) Patterns of retrograde amnesia for recent and remote incidental spatial learning in rats. Hippocampus 19:1212-1221. [PubMed] [Content]

Gaskin S, Gamliel A, Tardif M, Cole E, Mumby DG (2009) Incidental (unreinforced) and reinforced spatial learning in rats with ventral and dorsal lesions of the hippocampus. Behav Brain Res 202:64-70. [PubMed] [Content]

Piterkin P, Cole E, Cossette MP, Gaskin S, Mumby DG (2008) A limited role for the hippocampus in the modulation of novel-object preference by contextual cues. Learn Mem 15:785-791. [PubMed] [Content]

Caruana DA, Nesbitt C, Mumby DG, Chapman CA (2008) Seizure activity in the rat hippocampus, perirhinal and prefrontal cortex associated with transient global cerebral ischemia. J Neural Transm 115:401-411. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG, Piterkin P, Lecluse V, Lehmann H (2007) Perirhinal cortex damage and anterograde object-recognition in rats after long retention intervals. Behav Brain Res 185:82-87. [PubMed] [Content]

Lehmann H, Glenn MJ, Mumby DG (2007) Consolidation of object-discrimination memory is independent of the hippocampus in rats. Exp Brain Res 180:755-764. [PubMed] [Content]

O'Brien N, Lehmann H, Lecluse V, Mumby DG (2006) Enhanced context-dependency of object recognition in rats with hippocampal lesions. Behav Brain Res 170:156-162. [PubMed] [Content]

Lehmann H, Lecluse V, Houle A, Mumby DG (2006) Retrograde amnesia following hippocampal lesions in the shock-probe conditioning test. Hippocampus 16:379-387. [PubMed] [Content]

Glenn MJ, Lehmann H, Mumby DG, Woodside B (2005) Differential fos expression following aspiration, electrolytic, or excitotoxic lesions of the perirhinal cortex in rats. Behav Neurosci 119:806-813. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG, Tremblay A, Lecluse V, Lehmann H (2005) Hippocampal damage and anterograde object-recognition in rats after long retention intervals. Hippocampus 15:1050-1056. [PubMed] [Content]

Lehmann H, Carfagnini A, Yamin S, Mumby DG (2005) Context-dependent effects of hippocampal damage on memory in the shock-probe test. Hippocampus 15:18-25. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG (2004) Object Recognition. In: Behaviour of the Laboratory Rat: A Handbook With Tests, B Kolb and I.Q. Whishaw (Eds.). MIT Press.

Glenn MJ, Nesbitt C, Mumby DG (2003) Perirhinal cortex lesions produce variable patterns of retrograde amnesia in rats. Behav Brain Res 141:183-193. [PubMed] [Content]

Gaskin S, Tremblay A, Mumby DG (2003) Retrograde and anterograde object recognition in rats with hippocampal lesions. Hippocampus 13:962-969. [PubMed] [Content]

Astur RS, Klein RL, Mumby DG, Protz DK, Sutherland RJ, Martin GM (2002) A role for olfaction in object recognition by normal and hippocampal-damaged rats. Neurobiol Learn Mem 78:186-191. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG, Glenn MJ, Nesbitt C, Kyriazis DA (2002) Dissociation in retrograde memory for object discriminations and object recognition in rats with perirhinal cortex damage. Behav Brain Res 132:215-226. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG, Gaskin S, Glenn MJ, Schramek TE, Lehmann H (2002) Hippocampal damage and exploratory preferences in rats: memory for objects, places, and contexts. Learn Mem 9:49-57. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG (2001) Perspectives on object-recognition memory following hippocampal damage: lessons from studies in rats. Behav Brain Res 127:159-181. (Review) [PubMed] [Content]

Sutherland RJ, Weisend MP, Mumby D, Astur RS, Hanlon FM, Koerner A, Thomas MJ, Wu Y, Moses SN, Cole C, Hamilton DA, Hoesing JM (2001) Retrograde amnesia after hippocampal damage: recent vs. remote memories in two tasks. Hippocampus 11:27-42. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG, Glenn MJ (2000) Anterograde and retrograde memory for object discriminations and places in rats with perirhinal cortex lesions. Behav Brain Res 114:119-134. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG, Astur RS, Weisend MP, Sutherland RJ (1999) Retrograde amnesia and selective damage to the hippocampal formation: memory for places and object discriminations. Behav Brain Res 106:97-107. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG (1999) How do animals solve object-recognition tasks? Behav Brain Sci 22:461-462. (commentary) [Content]

Mumby DG, Cameli L, Glenn MJ (1999) Impaired allocentric spatial working memory and intact retrograde memory after thalamic damage caused by thiamine deficiency in rats. Behav Neurosci 113:42-50. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG (1999) Animal models of amnesia: What can they tell us about memory? In: Brain, Behavior, and Cognition: Animal Models and Human Studies, M. Haug and R.E. Whalen (Eds.), American Psychological Association. pp. 215-229.

Glenn MJ, Mumby DG (1998) Place memory is intact in rats with perirhinal cortex lesions. Behav Neurosci 112:1353-1365. [PubMed] [Content]

Kim CK, Kalynchuk LE, Kornecook TJ, Mumby DG, Dadgar NA, Pinel JP, Weinberg J (1997) Object-recognition and spatial learning and memory in rats prenatally exposed to ethanol. Behav Neurosci 111:985-995. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG (1997) Graduate school: winning strategies for getting in with or without excellent grades. Proto Press: Hudson, Quebec.

Mumby DG (1996) Sequential processing of "items" and "relations". Behav Brain Sci 19:770. [Content]

Mumby DG, Wood ER, Duva CA, Kornecook TJ, Pinel JP, Phillips AG (1996) Ischemia-induced object-recognition deficits in rats are attenuated by hippocampal ablation before or soon after ischemia. Behav Neurosci 110:266-281. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG, Mana MJ, Pinel JP, David E, Banks K (1995) Pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency impairs object recognition in rats. Behav Neurosci 109:1209-1214. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG (1995) Assessing working memory for objects in rats: no one said it was easy. Neuroreport 6:1960-1962. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG, Kornecook TJ, Wood ER, Pinel JP (1995) The role of experimenter-odor cues in the performance of object-memory tasks by rats. Animal Learning and Behavior 23:447-453. [Content]

Mumby DG, Pinel JP, Kornecook TJ, Shen MJ, Redila, VA (1995) Memory deficits following lesions of hippocampus or amygdala in rats: Assessment by an object-memory test battery. Psychobiology 23:26-36. [Content]

Pinel JP, Mumby DG, Dastur FN, Pinel JG (1994) Rat (Rattus norvegicus) defensive behavior in total darkness: risk-assessment function of defensive burying. J Comp Psychol 108:140-147. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG, Pinel JP (1994) Rhinal cortex lesions and object recognition in rats. Behav Neurosci 108:11-18. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG, Pinel JP, Dastur FN (1993) Mediodorsal thalamic lesions impair object recognition in rats. Psychobiology 21:27-36. [Content]

Wood ER, Mumby DG, Pinel JP, Phillips AG (1993) Impaired object recognition memory in rats following ischemia-induced damage to the hippocampus. Behav Neurosci 107:51-62. [PubMed] [Content]

Mumby DG, Wood ER, Pinel JP (1992) Object recognition memory in rats is only mildly impaired by lesions of the hippocampus and amygdala. Psychobiology 20:18-27. [Content]

Mistlberger RE, Mumby DG (1992) The limbic system and food-anticipatory circadian rhythms in the rat: ablation and dopamine blocking studies. Behav Brain Res 47:159-168. [PubMed] [Content]

Wilkie DM, Mumby DG, Needham G, Smeele M (1992) Sustained arm-visiting by nondeprived, non-rewarded rats in a radial maze. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30:314-316. [Content]

Mumby DG, Pinel JP, Wood ER (1990) Nonrecurring-items delayed nonmatching-to-sample in rats: A new paradigm for testing nonspatial working memory. Psychobiology 18:321-326. [Content]

Beck CH, Huh TJ, Mumby DG, Fundytus ME (1989) Schedule-induced behavior in rats: Pellets versus powder. Animal Learning & Behavior 17:49-62. [Content]

Mumby D, Beck CH (1988) Schedule-induced polydipsia: attenuating effects of decreased size of food granulations. Physiol Behav 43:375-381. [PubMed] [Content]


Biography

Dave Mumby received his Ph.D. in Biopsychology from the University of British Columbia in 1992. In 1994, after 18 months in a postdoctoral research position in Dr. Robert Sutherland's laboratory at the University of New Mexico, Dr. Mumby joined the Department of Psychology at Concordia University. In 1999 he joined the Center for Studies in Behavioural Neurobiology.
Dr. Mumby is a Fellow of Concordia University's Science College.


Teaching activities

I teach senior-level courses on:
1) animal behaviour (PSYC 457).
2) evolutionary perspectives on learning and memory (PSYC 467).
3) neurobiology of learning and memory (PSYC 451).

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