Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/finearts/art-education/faculty.html

David Pariser, PhD

Professor, Art Education

Office: S-EV 2629 
Engineering, Computer Science and Visual Arts Integrated Complex,
1515 St. Catherine W.
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 4644
Email: david.pariser@concordia.ca

What is art education in the 21st century?

"I think that, in terms of the basics, it's about creating people who are comfortable using the tools of art for their own purposes.  In the 21st century, that covers a huge range of media and approaches, but essentially, art education's basic task is literacy. You give people tools for being analytic, and you give them enough information - enough of an overview - that they can come to some conclusions of their own, which they can also defend."

"I would also say that the criteria for judging whether something works or not artistically haven't changed that much.  I don't care if you're using a cryogenic, multi-million dollar computer as a tool, ultimately you're still going to end up with something which has to be judged.  And those criteria really don't change - it's still the same organism doing the processing. I'm not saying you can't make great art on the web, for example, but it's still going to be consumed by the same organism that was consuming, say, Renaissance frescoes."

What do you consider to be your strengths and research interests?

"My strengths are that I am oriented towards the wider world of ideas; I have an eclectic taste and I dip into things widely.  I'm interested in the 'big issues', such as the evolutionary and biological roots of art; linking art and our experience of art to biology and neurology. I'm also interested in empirical work, framed both in psychological terms and sociological terms, that looks at art - the creation and the reception of art." 

"In terms of research, I am very interested in schools; I'm very involved in the department's specialization program, and I go into the schools quite often.  I'm interested in looking at the "delivery system" of art education.  The world of art education for me is art in the schools because ultimately the real engine behind education are the teachers in the classroom."

Two questions that interest me:

1): What can we learn about artistic development from looking at the juvenilia of great artists? Thanks to an SSHRC Leave Fellowship in 1984, I was able to investigate this question by visiting the sites where much of the juvenile work of three significant artists is kept. The article below was the culmination of this area of study. Pariser, D. (1995b). Lautrec- gifted child-artist and  artistic monument: Connections between juvenile and mature work. In Claire Golomb (Editor). The development of artistically gifted children. Selected case studies. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates Inc. 31-77.This.examined the relationship between Lautrec's choice of themes and styles in childhood-and his mature style and choice of subject matter.This was an initial examination of the relation of childhood artistic precocity and mature success.The following article was also an opportunity for me to synthesize the material I had gathered on various aspects of exceptional artistic development and performance. Material that spanned the work of autist-artists as well as great artists' juvenilia.  Pariser,  D. (1997). Graphic development in artistically exceptional children. In, Anna Kindler (Editor) Child development in art. Perspectives and interpretations.Reston VA: National Art Education Association: 115-131.A comprehensive review of several types of graphic exceptionality: Autistic children like Nadia  and Stephen Wiltshire, two famous  child artists: Precocious artist-children like Picasso and Lautrec, and Non-Western artist-children like the young girl Wang Yani, whose brush painting performances in the 1980's took North America by storm.

2) In what ways can we restructure the prevailing (linear, single terminus model) of graphic/representational development so that it better reflects the observed diversity of representational purposes and outcomes that characterise drawing performance and development ? My interest in the trajectory of art-historical and individual graphic development has been nourished by the work of Arnheim who long ago suggested that there is no "progress" in art- only an exploration of multiple representational avenues-each of which can generate effective representations. More recently, the work of Kindler and Darras has applied some of these insights to the study of graphic development. The work of Willats, likewise has provided a technically robust method of looking at the same issue by analysing the structure of drawings themselves. For this reason, I consider my 1995 article on Piagetian research significant. Pariser, D., (1995a). Not under the lamppost. Piagetian and Neo-Piagetian Research in the arts. A review and critique. The Journal of Aesthetic Education. 29 (2) :93-108. This was a continuation of my 1983 critique of notions found in Gablik's Progress In Art. Here I indicated the reasons why the Piagetian model, though very powerful in terms of clarifying the development of scientific/logical thought is not aptly applied to aesthetic and artistic development.Here also I  developed the contrast between single-terminus and muliple-terminus models of graphic development.


David Pariser principal research interests are: the development of drawing abilities and how drawing is taught in different cultures, cross-cultural aesthetic response to the art work of children and adults, observing life in classrooms and making explicit art teachers' expertise, expanding notions of graphic representation, and the use of narrative and documentary film and video as texts for study in art education.

He is currently involved with a research project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, that examines the cross-cultural validity of a model of aesthetic development. Other research interests include the development of anomalous drawing abilities in children, and in the trajectory of graphic development in the lives of world-class artists.

Since 1997 Pariser has been the Director of Student-Teaching Internships for the BFA Specialization program. He has also offered workshops and undergraduate art education courses to early childhood education students. At the graduate level he offers seminars in research in art education, as well as special topics courses in art education and related areas such as cognitive and social psychology and ethnography. He serves as a thesis advisor to masters and doctoral students.

Awards

Gaitskell Award for contributions to Canadian art education. (2007). Address titled: Just Remember, Wherever you Are, There You Are, or how Postmodern Rhetoric Impoverishes Art Teaching. Published in The Canadian Art Teacher, (2008) 8 (1) , 24-33
 
Elected Fellow of the American Psychological Association. (Division 10 Psychology and the Arts). (2000)
 
Esther Katz Rosen award administered by the American Psychological Association. With Susan Rostan and Howard Gruber: A Cross-Cultural Study of the Development and Asessment of Artistic Giftedness, (1999)
 
Visiting Scholar, Project Zero, Harvard  University, (1983)

Education

D.Ed, Harvard University


Research activities

Funded research

Gaitskell Award for contributions to Canadian art education. (2007). Address titled: Just Remember, Wherever you Are, There You Are, or how Postmodern Rhetoric Impoverishes Art Teaching. Published in The Canadian Art Teacher, (2008) 8 (1) , 24-33
 
Elected Fellow of the American Psychological Association. (Division 10 Psychology and the Arts). (2000)
 
Esther Katz Rosen award administered by the American Psychological Association. With Susan Rostan and Howard Gruber: A Cross-Cultural Study of the Development and Asessment of Artistic Giftedness, (1999)
 
Visiting Scholar, Project Zero, Harvard  University, (1983)


Publications

Book chapters, encyclopedia entries

Pariser(Forthcoming) The Limits of Social Construction : Promoting Creativity in the Visual Arts. Chapter in Forthcoming book on Art Education and Creativity, Edited by Dr.Enid Zimmerman (Indiana University) and Dr. Flavia Bastos, (University of Cincinnatti). To be published by the National Art Education Association, Reston Virginia.    
 
Pariser,(2008)  Entry on Child Art, in The International Encyclopedia of Communication, Wolfgang Donsbach (Editor). Blackwell Publishing  Ltd. (England and Australia) 2008.  Vol II, 451-453
 
Pariser, D., Kindler,A., van den Berg A., (2008).Drawing and Aesthetic Judgments Across Cultures:Diverse Pathways to Aesthetic Development. In, Children's understanding and production of pictures, drawings and art, Constance Milbrath and  Hanns Trautner, Editors, Cambridge Massachusetts: Hogrefe. 293-319.
 
Pariser, D., (2006) Considering the u-curve. Essays for Gardner under fire: A rebel psychologist faces his critics. Jeffrey Schaler, Editor. Chicago: Open Court Publishing Company. 255-276.
 
Zimmerman, E., & Pariser, D. (2004). Learning in the Visual Arts: Characteristics of Gifted and Talented Individuals. In, Elliot Eisner & Michael Day (Editors), Handbook of research and policy in art education. Mahwah, New Jersey:Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 379-409.
 
Pariser, D.(1999a). Conventionality and Creativity. In The encyclopedia of creativity. Vol.1 Mark Runco and Steven Pritzker (Editors). San Diego: Academic Press..373-384.
 
Pariser, D.(1999b). Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.In The encyclopedia of creativity. Vol.2 Mark Runco and Steven Pritzker (Editors). San Diego: Academic Press. 665-672.
 
Pariser, D. (1995). Lautrec - Gifted child Artist and Artistic Monument: Connections Between Juvenile and Mature Work, in Claire Golomb (Editor) The development of artistically gifted children. Selected case studies. New Jersey: Hillsdale, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 31-70

Journal articles, book reviews

Pariser (2009) A woman of valor: Freidl-Dicker Brandeis. Art Teacher in Theresienstadt Concentration Camp. Art Education, Vol.61, No.4, 6-12.
 
Pariser, D., (2008) Review of , From drawing to visual culture. A history of art education in Canada. Harold Pearse, Editor. Canadian Review of Art Education, Research and Issues, 31(2), 495-500.  
 
Pariser,D., (2005). Review of Willats' Making sense of children's drawings. Canadian Review of Art Education, Research and Issues. Vol.32, 93-104
 
Pariser,D. (2004) Review of, Eisner, E., Arts and the creation of meaning. The International Journal of Behavioural Development, 28 (3), 275-276.
 
Kindler, A.,Liu W.-C., Pariser, D., van den Berg A., (2003). A Cultural Perspective on Graphic Development: Aesthetic Asessment of Local and Foreign Drawings in Taiwan. Taiwan: Research in Arts Education, (5) May..23-47.
 
Pariser, D. (2003). Entry on Rudolf Arnheim, in  Key writers on art: The twentieth century. Chris Murray (Editor). London: Routledge..8-14.
 
Rostan,S.,Pariser,D.,Gruber,H.,(2002). A Cross-cultural Study of the Development of Artistic Talent, Creativity and Giftedness. High Ability Studies, Vol.13,No.2, 122-154.
 
Pariser,D.,& van den Berg,A.,(2001)Teaching Art versus teaching Taste: What Art Teachers Can Learn from Looking at a Cross-Cultural Evaluation of Children's Art. Poetics: Journal of Empirical Research on Literature,the Media and the Arts.v.29, 331-350.
 
Pariser, D. (1999). The children of Kronos: What two artists and two cultures did with their childhood art. Journal of Aesthetic Education. 33 (1).62-72.
 
Pariser, D. (1992-1993). The artistically precocious child in different cultural contexts:Wang Yani and Toulouse Lautrec. Journal of Multicultural and Cross-Cultural Research in Art Education. Vol 10/11, 49-72
 
Pariser, D. (1991). Normal and unusual aspects of juvenile artistic development in Klee, Lautrec, Picasso. Creativity Research Journal, Vol 4 (1), 51-66


Teaching activities

Selected Thesis Supervision

M.A.

Gilkes, Katheryn. Teaching Machines; Examining and Re-imagining the use of Film in     the Classroom. Concordia University, 2009.

Mandrona, April. Into the Third Dimension: An Exploration of Children's Human Figure     Sculptures and Drawings. Concordia University, 2009.

Sabatino, Carla. Videoconferencing: assessing its effectiveness as a teaching tool in the     highschool.  Concordia University, 2008.

Sennitt, Aaron. Signs of Substance: An Investigation and Bookwork Regarding the     Confluence of Art and Language in an Elementary School Context.

Smith, Robert. The Effect of Focal Points on Figure Orientation in the Drawing of     Children Four to Seven Years Old.  Concordia University, 1982.

PhD.


Albertson, Constant.  Because Clay Has A Memory; Conversations with Dyslexic Artists.     Concordia University, 2001.

Coker, Malcolm. The Contribution of Traditional Schooling to the Education of Artists in Sierra Leone. Concordia University, 2001.

Collins, Michael. The Dialogue Journal-Sketchbook in Art Education: Developing Creative Abilities in Art Students Through Mutually Self-Reflective Dialogue Between Teacher and Student. Concordia University, 2001.

Lian Duan, Phd. Thesis 2011- Title: Western influences on Contemporary Chinese Art Education.

Wancen Liu, Phd. Thesis 2011- Title: Interviews with Nine Chinese Artists. Narrative Research on Chinese Art Education During the 20th Century.

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