Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/artsci/psychology/faculty.html

Dr. Michael Conway, PhD

Professor, Psychology

Office: L-PY 101-3 
Psychology Building,
7141 Sherbrooke W.
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 7541
Email: Michael.Conway@concordia.ca

Education

PhD (University of Waterloo)

Research interests

I am a social psychologist who is interested in people’s perceptions of others’ assertiveness and warmth. In particular, I am interested in the nonverbal cues that people use in these social perceptions, as well as how people think of assertiveness and warmth in terms of intentionality and planning. A second area of research is subjective social status, which has to do with people’s own subjective sense of where they fall on the general socioeconomic ladder defined by education, occupation, and income. A third area of interest is rumination on sadness and how it relates to depression.

 


Selected publications

Pushkar, D., Bye, D., Conway, M., Wrosch, C.,Chaikelson, J., Etezadi, J., Giannopoulos, C., Li, K., and N. Tabri. (2014). Does child gender predict older parents’ well-being? Social Indicators Research, 118, 285-303.

Tabri, N., & Conway, M. (2011). Negative expectations for the group’s outcomes undermine normative collective action:Conflict between Christian and Muslim groups in Lebanon. British Journal of Social Psychology, 50, 649-669.

Alfonsi, G., Conway, M., & Pushkar, D. (2011). The lower subjective social status of neurotic individuals: Multiple pathways through occupational prestige, income, and illness. Journal of Personality, 79, 619-642.

Pushkar, D. Chaikelson, J., Conway, M., Etezadi, J.,Giannopoulos, C., Li, K., & Wrosch, C. (2010). Testing continuity and activity variables as predictors of positive and negative affect in retirement.The Journals of Gerontology: Series B:Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 65, 42-49.

VonHecker, U., & Conway, M. (2010). Magnitude of negative priming varies with conceptual task difficulty: Attentional resources are involved in episodic retrieval processes. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 63, 666-678.

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