Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/artsci/polisci/faculty.html

Antoine Bilodeau, PhD

Associate Professor, Political Science

Office: S-H 1255-9 
Henry F. Hall Building,
1455 De Maisonneuve W.
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 5067
Email: Antoine.Bilodeau@concordia.ca

Dr. Antoine Bilodeau’s research focuses on the political integration of immigrants in Canada and other Western democracies and on understanding the roots of views toward immigration and ethnic diversity. He also studies questions relating to youth political engagement and political socialization.

Dr. Bilodeau is the leader of the Provincial Diversity Project with Luc Turgeon (Ottawa), Ailsa Henderson (Edinburgh) and Stephen White (Concordia). 

Dr. Bilodeau is a member of the steering committee for the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, a senior research affiliate with the Canadian Network for research on Terrorism, Security and Society (TSAS), and a member of the Center for Immigration Policy Evaluation.

Education

PhD (University of Toronto)

Research interests

Canadian politics, immigration, ethnic diversity, youth political engagement and political behaviors.

Research affiliations

Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship 

Canadian Network for Research on Terrorism, Security and Society

Centre for Immigration Policy Evaluation

Awards

Winner of the 2016/2017 Concordia University Research Award (Person and Society).

Winner of the McMenemy Prize for the best article published in French or English in the Canadian Journal of Political Science in 2010: Bilodeau, Antoine, S. White and N. Nevitte. 2010. “The Development of Dual Loyalties: Immigrants’ Integration to Regional Canadian Dynamics.” Canadian Journal of Political Science 43 (03): 515-544.    


Teaching activities

POLI 204                Introduction to Canadian Politics
POLI 334                Political Participation in Canada
POLI 429                Political Socialization Advanced Seminar in Canadian Politics
POLI 683U/813C      Politics and Policies of Immigration


Selected publications

Co-edited Books

Bilodeau, A (editor). 2016. Just Our Ordinary Citizens? Toward a Comparative Portrait of the Political Immigrant. University of Toronto Press. In press.


Kanji, Mebs, Antoine Bilodeau and Thomas Scotto (editors). 2012. The Canadian Election Studies, Assessing Four Decades of Influence. Vancouver: UBC Press.  

Peer Reviewed Articles

Bilodeau, A. 2016. "Usage du français et préférences politiques des néo-Québécois.Revue canadienne de science politique 49 (1) : 1-22 (doi:10.1017/S0008423916000160) Available through First View.  

Bilodeau, A., L. Turgeon, S. White, and A. Henderson. 2015. Seeing the Same Canada?  Visible  Minorities’ Views of the Federation.  IRPP Study No.56. Released on November 18th.

Bilodeau, A. and S. White. 2015. “Trust among Recent Immigrants in Canada: Levels, Origins, and Implications for Integration.” Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies (available for preview online).

Bilodeau, A. 2015. “Migrating Gender Inequalities? Immigrant Women’s Participation in Political Survey Research.” International Migration Review. Available through Early View.

White S., A. Bilodeau, and N. Nevitte. 2015. “Earning Their Support: Feelings toward the Host Political Community among Recent Immigrants in Canada” Ethnic and Racial Studies 38 (2): 292-308.

Bilodeau, A. & L. Turgeon. 2014. « L’immigration: Une menace à la culture québécoise? Portrait et analyses des perceptions régionales. » Canadian Journal of Political Science. 45 (2): 281-305.

Turgeon, Luc, and. A. Bilodeau. 2014. “Minority Nations and Attitudes Toward Immigration. The Case of Quebec.” Nations and Nationalism 20 (2): 317-336.

Bilodeau, Antoine. 2014. “Is Democracy the Only Game in Town? Tension Between Immigrants’ Democratic Desires and Authoritarian Imprints.” Democratization 21 (2): 359-381.

Bilodeau, Antoine, L. Turgeon, and E. Karakoc. 2012. “Small Worlds of Diversity?  Views Toward Immigration and Racial Diversity in Canadian Provinces.” Canadian Journal of Political Science 45 (3): 579-605.

Bilodeau, Antoine, N. Fadol. 2011. “The Roots of Contemporary Attitudes toward Immigration in Australia: Contextual and Individual-Level Influences.” Ethnic and Racial Studies 34 (6): 1088-1109.

Bilodeau, Antoine, S. White and N. Nevitte. 2010. “The Development of Dual Loyalties: Immigrants’ Integration to Regional Canadian Dynamics.” Canadian Journal of Political Science 43 (03): 515-544.

Bilodeau, Antoine, Ian McAllister, and Mebs Kanji. 2010 “Adaptation to Democracy among Immigrants in Australia.” International Political Science Review 31(2): 141-166.

Bilodeau, Antoine. 2009. “Residential Segregation and the Electoral Participation of Immigrants in Australia.” International Migration Review 43 (1): 142-167.

Bilodeau, Antoine. 2008. “Immigrants’ Voice through Protest Politics in Canada and Australia: Assessing the Impact of Pre-Migration Political Repression.” Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 34(6): 975-1002.

Kanji, Mebs and A.Bilodeau. 2006. “Value Diversity and Support for Electoral Reform inCanada.”  PS: Political Science and Politics, Vol.39 (4): 829-836.


Peer Reviewed Chapters in Co-edited Books

White, S. and A. Bilodeau. 2014. “Canadian Immigrant Electoral Support in a Comparative Perspective.” in Turgeon et al. (eds), Comparing Canada: Methods and Perspective on Canadian Politics. Vancouver: UBC Press, pp. 123-146.

Bilodeau,A. 2013. “L’avantage libéral: Le vote des minorités visibles lors des élections québécoises de 2012.” Dans F. Bastien, É. Bélanger et F. Gélineau (éditeurs),Les élections québécoises de 2012, (Montréal: Presses de l’Université deMontréal).

Bilodeau, Antoine, and André Blais. 2011. “Le vote obligatoire exerce-t-il un effet de socialisation politique?” In A.Amjahad, J-M. De Waele and M. Hastings (eds) Le vote obligatoire, Débats, enjeux et défis (Paris: Economica).

Bilodeau, Antoine, and M. Kanji. 2010. “The New Immigrant Voter, 1965-2004: The Emergence of a New Liberal Partisan? In Laura Stephenson and Cameron Anderson (eds), Perspectives on the Canadian Voter: Puzzlesof Influence and Choice. Vancouver: UBC Press.

Reports for Government

Bilodeau, A., and L. Turgeon. 2015. Voter Turnout among Younger Canadians and Visible Minority Canadians: Evidence from the Provincial Diversity Project.  Report for Elections Canada. June.


The Provincial Diversity Project

The Provincial Diversity Project is a research platform that aims at providing a better understanding of provincial unique realities in Canada in terms of identity and attachment, views about federalism, attitudes toward ethnic diversity and immigration, as well as views on social, economic and political issues in Canada.

The Provincial Diversity Project is a multicollaborative project led by Antoine Bilodeau (Concordia University) along with Luc Turgeon (Ottawa), Ailsa Henderson (Edinburgh) and Stephen E. White (Concordia). The Provincial Diversity Project is realized in collaboration with Léger Marketing and with the support of Concordia University, the Secrétariat aux affaires intergouvernementales canadiennes du Québec, the Canadian Network for Research on Terrorism, Security and Society, Elections Canada, the Institute for Research on Public Policy and the Chaire de recherche du Canada en études québécoises et canadiennes de l’UQAM.

The Provincial Diversity Project survey was conducted in the winter of 2014 among close to 10,000 Canadians through an internet survey conducted by Léger Marketing. The Provincial Diversity Project survey is composed of three legs.

The first leg of the project provides a portrait of Canadians in each province. Accordingly, more than 6400 Canadians were interviewed in all ten provinces. 1000 respondents were interviewed in each of Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia. 500 Canadians were interviewed in each of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Manitoba and Saskatchewan, and 400 Canadians were interview in Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador.

The second leg of the project provides oversamples of visible minority Canadians in Quebec, Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia. 400 visible minority Canadians were interviewed in each of the four provinces.

Finally, the third leg of the project provides regional samples of young Canadians (aged 18 to 34). 350 young Canadians were interviewed in each of the following regions: the Atlantic, Ontario, the Prairies, and British Columbia. In addition, 500 young Canadians in Quebec were also interviews.

For more information about the Provincial Diversity Project, please contact antoine.bilodeau@concordia.ca

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