Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/artsci/geography-planning-environment/faculty.html

Ted Rutland, PhD

Associate Professor, Geography, Planning and Environment

Office: S-H 1255-43 
Henry F. Hall Building,
1455 De Maisonneuve W.
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 2053
Email: ted.rutland@concordia.ca
Website(s): Academia.edu Profile

Ted has a PhD in geography from the University of British Columbia, and previous degrees from Dalhousie University and Mount Allison University. His research focuses primarily on the racial politics of urban planning and policing in Canadian cities. This work began as a doctoral thesis focused on the history of urban planning and racism in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Parts of this research have been published as journal articles and book chapters (see below), while the remainder provides the core of a forthcoming book entitled Displacing Blackness: Planning, Power, and Race in Twentieth Century Halifax. More recent research has focused on Montréal, and a series of issues related to housing, tenants' rights, urban security, and policing.

Ted is interested in supervising critically oriented masters and PhD research on the city of Montreal, especially research concerned with policing and housing.


Teaching activities


Selected publications

Book

Rutland, T. Forthcoming. Displacing Blackness: Planning, Power, and Race in Twentieth-Century Halifax. Toronto, University of Toronto Press.

Articles and Book Chapters

Rutland, T. 2016. Deux formes de discrimination territoriale à Halifax. In C. Lelévrier et al. (Eds) Discrimination territoriales: usages et enjeux de la notion. Paris, L'Oeil d'or.

Rutland, T. 2015. Enjoyable life: planning, amenity, and the contested terrain of urban biopolitics. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 33(5): 850-868.

Rutland, T. 2015. "The city is an apartment house": property, improvement, and dispossession in early twentieth-century Halifax, Nova Scotia. Urban Geography, 36(3): 359-384.

Rutland, T. 2013. "Where the little life unfolds": women's citizenship, moral regulation, and the production of scale in early twentieth-century Halifax, Nova Scotia. Journal of Historical Geography, 42: 167–179.

Rutland, T. 2013. Activists in the making: urban movements, political processes, and the creation of political subjects. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 37(3): 989-1011.

Rutland, T. 2013. Energizing environmental concern in Portland, Oregon. In B. Miller, W. Nicholls, and J. Beaumont (Eds.) Spaces of Contention. Brookfield, MA: Ashgate.

Rutland, T. 2010. The financialization of urban redevelopment. Geography Compass, 4 (8): 1167-1178.

Rutland, T, and Aylett, A. 2008. The work of policy: actor-networks, governmentality, and local action on climate change in Portland, Oregon. Environment and Planning D: Society and Space, 26(4): 627-646.

Reports

Comité logement de la Petite Patrie et Laboratoire Urbain de l'Université Concordia. 2014. La conversion en condos et la copropriété indivise dans le quartier de la Petite Patrie.

Media



Audio: Presentation on gentrification and white ignorance


Audio: Interview on gentrification and housing struggles


Audio: Interview on gentrification and condo conversions

Video: Introduction to the film, The Pruit-Igoe Myth


Audio: Interview about race and planning in Halifax


Audio: Interview about planning and black history in Nova Scotia

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