Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/faculty.html

Dr. Hany Gomaa, PhD

Assistant Professor, Mechanical, Industrial and Aerospace Engineering

Office: S-EV 3269 
Engineering, Computer Science and Visual Arts Integrated Complex,
1515 St. Catherine W.
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 7035
Email: hany.gomaa@concordia.ca

Teaching activities

Assistant Professor

1/8/2016 – Current Date  

COURSES BEING TAUGHT:  

1.  Fluid Mechanics II (MECH 361), 3.5 Credits:

Differential analysis of fluid flows, vorticity, stream function, stresses, and strains. Navier-Stokes equations and solutions for parallel flows. Euler’s equations, irrotational and potential flows, plane potential flows. Viscous flows in pipes, laminar and turbulent flows, major and minor losses. Flow over immersed bodies, boundary layers, separation and thickness. Drag, lift and applications. Introduction to compressible flows, speed of sound, Mach cone, and some characteristics of supersonic flows.


2.  Mechanical Engineering Drawing (MECH 211), 3.5 Credits:

Introduction to graphic language and design — means and techniques. The third and the first angle projections. Orthographic projection of points, lines, planes and solids. Principal and auxiliary views. Views in a given direction. Sectional views. Intersection of lines, planes and solids. Development of surfaces. Drafting practices. Dimensioning, fits and tolerance. Computer-aided drawing and solid modeling. Working drawings — detail and assembly drawing. Design practice. Machine elements representation.


3.  Machine Drawing and Design (MECH 313), 3 Credits:

Introduction to engineering design and design process. Problem definition, solution formulation, model development and collaboration aspects of design process. The use of drawings and other graphical methods in the process of engineering design. Industrial standards and specifications, design of fits, linear and geometrical tolerances. Design projects based on design philosophies will involve design and selection of many standard machine components like mechanical drives, cams, clutches, couplings, brakes, seals, fasteners, springs, and bearings. Drawing representation of standard components. Design projects are an integral part of this course.


4.  Dynamics (ENGR 243), 3 Credits:

Kinematics of a particle and rigid body; forces and accelerations; work and energy; impulse and momentum; dynamics of a system of particles and rigid bodies, introduction to vibrations.

5. Capstone Mechanical Engineering Design Project (MECH 490), 4 Credits:
Prerequisite: 75 credits in the program; ENCS 282; ENGR 301; MECH 344, 390. A supervised design, simulation or experimental capstone design project including a preliminary project proposal with complete project plan and a technical report at the end of the fall term; a final report by the group and presentation at the end of the winter term. Lectures: one hour per week, one term. Equivalent laboratory time: three hours per week, two terms.
NOTE: Students will work in groups under direct supervision of a faculty member.

6. MIAE Department Curriculum Innovation Committee Member
The curriculum innovative committee has the command to be proactive in understanding the undergraduate students continuous on going needs and making sure the curriculums of MIAE undergraduate programs are keeping up-to-date.

Lecturer / Part Time Professor

1/1/2016 – 1/6/2016  

COURSES TAUGHT:  

1. Dynamics (ENGR 243), 3 Credits:

Kinematics of a particle and rigid body; forces and accelerations; work and energy; impulse and momentum; dynamics of a system of particles and rigid bodies, introduction to vibrations.

2. Machine Drawing and Design (MECH 313), 3 Credits:

Introduction to engineering design and design process. Problem definition, solution formulation, model development and collaboration aspects of design process. The use of drawings and other graphical methods in the process of engineering design. Industrial standards and specifications, design of fits, linear and geometrical tolerances. Design projects based on design philosophies will involve design and selection of many standard machine components like mechanical drives, cams, clutches, couplings, brakes, seals, fasteners, springs, and bearings. Drawing representation of standard components. Design projects are an integral part of this course.


Teaching Assistant, Lab Instructor & Coordinator, Tutor on Duty, Course Coordinator and Assistant Lecturer

1/9/2007 – 1/10/2015  



COURSES TAUGHT:
1.    Fluid Mechanics I (ENGR 361), 3 Credits:

Basic concepts and principles of Fluid Mechanics. Classification of fluid flow. Hydrostatic forces on plane and curved surfaces, buoyancy and stability, fluids in rigid body motion. Mass, momentum, and energy conservation integral equations. Bernoulli equation. Basic concepts of pipe and duct flow. Introduction to Navier-Stokes equations. Similarity and model studies.


2.    Fluid Mechanics II (MECH 361), 3.5 Credits:

Differential analysis of fluid flows, vorticity, stream function, stresses, and strains. Navier-Stokes equations and solutions for parallel flows. Euler’s equations, irrotational and potential flows, plane potential flows. Viscous flows in pipes, laminar and turbulent flows, major and minor losses. Flow over immersed bodies, boundary layers, separation and thickness. Drag, lift and applications. Introduction to compressible flows, speed of sound, Mach cone, and some characteristics of supersonic flows.


3.    Mechanics of Materials (ENGR 244), 3.75 Credits:

Mechanical behavior of materials; stress; strain; shear and bending moment diagrams; introduction to inelastic action. Analysis and design of structural and machine elements subjected to axial, torsional, and flexural loadings. Combined stresses and stress transformation. Deflections. Introduction to elastic stability.


4.    Mechanical Engineering Drawing (MECH 211), 3.5 Credits:

Introduction to graphic language and design — means and techniques. The third and the first angle projections. Orthographic projection of points, lines, planes and solids. Principal and auxiliary views. Views in a given direction. Sectional views. Intersection of lines, planes and solids. Development of surfaces. Drafting practices. Dimensioning, fits and tolerance. Computer-aided drawing and solid modeling. Working drawings — detail and assembly drawing. Design practice. Machine elements representation.


5.    Machine Drawing and Design (MECH 313), 3 Credits:

Introduction to engi­neering design and design process. Problem definition, solution formulation, model development and collaboration aspects of design process. The use of drawings and other graphical methods in the process of engineering design. Industrial standards and specifications, design of fits, linear and geometrical tolerances. Design projects based on design philosophies will involve design and selection of many standard machine com­ponents like mechanical drives, cams, clutches, couplings, brakes, seals, fasteners, springs, and bearings. Drawing representation of standard components. Design projects are an integral part of this course. Lectures: three hours per week. Tutorial: two hours per week.


6.    Applied Ordinary Differential Equations (ENGR 213), 3 Credits

This course introduces Engineering students to the theory and application of ordinary differential equations. Definition and terminology, initial-value problems, separable differential equations, linear equations, exact equations, solutions by substitution, linear models, orthogonal trajectories, complex numbers, form of complex numbers: powers and roots, theory: linear equations, homogeneous linear equations with constant coefficients, undetermined coefficients, variation of parameters, Cauchy-Euler equation, reduction of order, linear models: initial value, review of power series, power series solutions, theory, homogeneous linear systems, solution by diagonalisation, non-homogeneous linear systems. Eigen values and eigenvectors. Lectures: three hours per week. Tutorial: two hours per week.


7.    Applied Advanced Calculus (ENGR 233), 3 Credits

This course introduces Engineering students to the theory and application of advanced calculus. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, total and exact differentials, approximations with differentials. Tangent plane and normal line to a surface, directional derivatives, gradient. Double and triple integrals. Polar, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates. Change of variables in double and triple integrals. Vector differential calculus; divergence, curl, curvature, line integrals, Green’s theorem, surface integrals, divergence theorem, applications of divergence theorem, Stokes’ theorem. Lectures: three hours per week. Tutorial: two hours per week.


8.    Dynamics (ENGR 243), 3 Credits:

Kinematics of a particle and rigid body; forces and accelerations; work and energy; impulse and momentum; dynamics of a system of particles and rigid bodies, introduction to vibrations.


9.    Composition and Argumentation for Engineers (ENSC 272), 3 Credits:

Completion of all ESL courses required on admission. Fundamentals of English composition and argumentation: grammar; reasoning and persuasion; persuasive proofs; argumentation; structuring and outlining; the problem statement; the body; and the conclusions. Language and persuasion for effective communication in professional engineering. Cultivation of a writing style firmly based on clear and critical thinking skills.


10.    TechnicalWriting and Communication (ENCS 282), 3 Credits:
Technical writing form and style. Technical andscientific papers, abstracts, reports. Library research and referencing methodsfor engineers and computer scientists. Technical communication usinginformation technology: document processing software, computer-assistedpresentation, analysis and design of web presentation, choice and use ofappropriate tools. Students will prepare an individual major report and make anoral presentation. Lectures: three hours per week. Tutorial: two hours perweek.

11.   Professional Practice and Responsibility (ENGR 201), 1.5 Credits:

Health and safety issues for engineering projects: Quebec and Canadian legislation; safe work practices; general laboratory safety common to all engineering disciplines, and specific laboratory safety pertaining to particular engineering disciplines. Review of the legal framework in Quebec, particularly the Professional Code and the Engineers Act, as well as professional ethics.



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