Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/faculty.html

Dr. Arseli Dokumaci, PhD

Assistant Professor, Communication Studies

Image description: A profile photo of a light-skinned woman in her 30's, with short black hair and wearing a black dress.
Photo credits, Jakob Dall
Office: L-CJ 4427 
Communication Studies and Journalism Building,
7141 Sherbrooke W.
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 4883
Email: arseli.dokumaci@concordia.ca
Availability: By appointment.

Education

BA, Translation and Interpreting, Boğaziçi University

Certificate in Film Studies, Boğaziçi University

MA, Film and Communication, Bahçeşehir University

PhD, Performance Studies, University of Wales, Aberystwyth

Postdoctoral research, Communication Studies, Concordia University

FQRSC postdoctoral fellowship, McGill University, Department of Social Studies of Medicine

ERC postdoctoral fellowship, University of Copenhagen, Department of Anthropology

I am an interdisciplinary scholar working at the intersections of disability, performance, media and medical anthropology. My research focuses on various aspects of disability, the performance of everyday life, activism, affordance theory, visual ethnography and anthropologies of health and disability. I am also a video-maker, and in my research-creation videos, I explore how disabled people go about their everyday lives, and come up with micro-activist affordances of all kinds in ways that remake the world, and reimagine the everyday, and how disability as a critical lens and a method can allow us to rethink and practice media in new ways. Currently, I am working on my monograph, Micro-activist Affordances: An Ecological Approach to Disability and Performance.


Teaching activities

Coms 642/893 - Disability and Media Technologies


Publications

Selected Publications

(Accepted) “Disabilitisation of Medicine: The emergence of Activities of Daily Living Scales and Quality of Life Measurements”, The History of the Human Sciences. 

(Accepted) “A Theory of Micro-activist Affordances: Disability, Improvisation and Disorienting Affordances,” The South Atlantic Quarterly.  

(2018) “Disability as Method: Interventions in the Habitus of Ableism through Media-Creation,” Disability Studies Quarterly, 38(3). 

(2017) “Vital Affordances /Occupying Niches: An Ecological Approach to Disability and Performance,” RiDE: The Journal of Applied Theatre andPerformance, 22(3): 393-412.

(2016) “Affordance Creations of DisabilityPerformance: Limits of a Disabled Theater,” Theatre Research in Canada, 37(2): 164-199.

MontrealIn/accessible Collective (2013) “Virtual Poster Series (ViP) #1: TrafficLights,” Canadian Journal of Disability Studies 2(4).

(2013) “On Falling Ill,” Performance Research: A Journal of the Performing Arts 18(4): 107-15. 

Book Chapters

(2016) "Mikro-aktivistische Affordanzen: Critical Disability als Methode zur Untersuchung medialer Praktiken," in B. Ochsner and R. Stock (Eds) senseAbility: Mediale Praktiken des Sehens und Hörens. Bielefeld: Transcript, pp. 257-80.  

(2016) “Micro-activist Affordances of Disability: Transformative Potential of Participation,” in M. Denecke et al. (Eds) Reclaiming Participation: Technology - Mediation - Collectivity, Bielefeld: Transcript, pp. 67-83.  

(2014) “Misfires that Matter: Habitus of the Disabled Body,” in M. Blažević and L. Feldman (Eds) Misperformance: Essays in Shifting Perspectives, Ljubljana: Maska Publishing, pp. 91-108. 

(2011) “Performance of Muslim Daily Prayer by Physically Disabled Practitioners,” in D. Schumm and M. Stoltzfus (Eds) Disability in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: Sacred Texts, Historical Traditions, and Social Analysis, New York: Palgrave MacMillan, pp. 127-140.

Interviews / Online Publications

(2017) "Disability as Method," Medical Anthropology at UCL, https://medanthucl.com/2017/07/26/disability-as-method/ 

(2015) "In Conversation with Arseli Dokumaci, FQRSC Postdoctoral Researcher," McGill Reporter, http://publications.mcgill.ca/reporter/2015/03/in-conversation-with-arseli-dokumaci-fqrsc-postdoctoral-researcher/

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