Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/artsci/religions-cultures/faculty.html

Carly Daniel-Hughes, ThD

Associate Professor, Religions and Cultures

Chair Department of Religions and Cultures


Office: S-FA 201 
FA Annex,
2060 Mackay
Phone: (514) 848-2424 ext. 2066
Email: carly.danielhughes@concordia.ca

Carly Daniel-Hughes earned her doctorate from Harvard University in Early Christian Studies. She teaches courses in the history of Christianity, biblical studies, and women, gender and sexuality in Religion. Her publications include The Salvation of the Flesh in Tertullian of Carthage: Dressing for the Resurrection (Palgrave Macmillan 2011) as well as the co-edited volume sDressing Judeans and Christians in Antiquity (with Kristi Upson-Saia and Alicia Batten, Ashgate 2014) and The Bloomsbury Reader in Religion, Sexuality, and Gender (with Donald Boisvert, Bloomsbury, 2016). Her research concerns how embodied social practices (dress, food and funerary practices) both informed and were shaped by early Christian worldviews on salvation, the self, and the body. Recent work examines gender and sexuality in Roman antiquity, with a focus on their relevance for contemporary life. Presently she is writing on the intersections between gender, death, and violence both in the Roman Empire and our own time. 

 

The winner of two university-wide teaching awards, Dr. Daniel-Hughes is also a passionate teacher and mentor. She is a member of the Department of Religions and Cultures Women, Gender, and Sexuality Seminar.

Education

ThD (Harvard Divinity School)
MDiv (Harvard Divinity School)
MA (Florida State University)

Research interests

Gender and Sexuality 
Early Christianity
Late Antiquity and the Roman Empire
Biblical Studies
Material Culture
Cultural Studies

Field areas

Religions and Cultures in Late Antiquity
Women, Gender, and Sexuality

Traditions

Christianity


Select Graduate Seminars

Reading Sex in the Bible
Early Christian Bodies
The Making of Christianity
Christian Feminist Thought

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