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François-Marc Gagnon receives Prix Gérard-Morisset

Concordian awarded for significant contributions to the preservation of the province's cultural heritage.
November 2, 2010
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By Tyler Yank
Source: Media Relations

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François-Marc
François-Marc Gagnon

François-Marc Gagnon, Director and Chair of the Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute for Studies in Canadian Art at Concordia University, has been awarded the 2010 Prix Gérard-Morisset as part of the Prix du Québec.

This prize is the most prestigious distinction awarded by the Government of Quebec to individuals who have made significant contributions to the preservation of the province’s cultural heritage.

Internationally recognized as an outstanding scholar in Canadian visual culture, Gagnon was named to the Order of Canada in 1999.

He is a teacher, researcher, writer, lecturer and a tireless promoter of Canada’s visual heritage.

He taught at the Université de Montréal for 35 years until he retired in 2000. He also lectured to graduate students enrolled in the Concordia Department of Art History.

A prolific researcher, Gagnon has written several books such as his 1978 biography of artist Paul-Émile Borduas for which he received the Governor General's Award.

Gagnon has been an honoured speaker at numerous scholarly conferences across Canada and reached the wider community through his television series, Introduction à la peinture moderne au Québec, broadcast on the Canal Savoir.

More recently, he presented a series of annual lectures on aspects of Canadian art at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts in conjunction with the Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute for Studies in Canadian Art at Concordia.

The 2010 Prix Gérard-Morisset will be presented to Gagnon at an official ceremony on Tuesday November 9 at the National Assembly of Quebec.

Related links:
•    Prix du Quebec
•    Gail and Stephen A. Jarislowsky Institute for Studies in Canadian Art
•    Concordia Department of Art History

 

 

 

 



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