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April 16, 2019: Invited Speaker Seminar: Some Security Metrics and Their Application to Analysis and Synthesis of Networked Control Systems


Dr. Iman Shames
University of Melbourne

Tuesday, April 16, 2019 at 3:00 pm
Room EV003.309

Abstract

As more attention is paid to security in the context of control systems and as attacks occur to real control systems throughout the world, it has become clear that some of the most nefarious attacks are those that evade detection. The term stealthy has come to encompass a variety of techniques that attackers can employ to avoid being detected. In this talk, for a class of perturbed linear time-invariant systems, we propose two security metrics to quantify the potential impact that stealthy attacks could have on the system dynamics by tampering with sensor measurements. We provide analysis mathematical tools (in terms of linear matrix inequalities) to quantify these metrics for given system dynamics, control structure, system monitor, and set of sensors being attacked. Then, we provide synthesis tools (in terms of semidefinite programs) to redesign controllers and monitors such that the impact of stealthy attacks is minimized and the required attack-free system performance is guaranteed.

Biography

Iman Shames is currently a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne. He had been a McKenzie fellow at the same department from 2012 to 2014. Previously, he was an ACCESS Postdoctoral Researcher at the ACCESS Linnaeus Centre, the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. He received his Ph.D. degree in engineering from the Australian National University, Canberra, Australia in 2011. His current research interests include, but are not limited to, optimisation theory and numerical optimisation, mathematical systems theory, and security and privacy in cyber-physical systems.




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