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Confocal microscopes

Nikon Livescan sweptfield confocal microscope

 

The Livescan sweptfield confocal microscope is a fully automated inverted microscope, equipped with a Heliophor LED-based light source (405, 480, 555 nm) for epifluorescence and a 4 lasers (405, 488, 561, 640 nm) for confocal imaging. It is equipped with 3 bright lenses (40, 60, 100x), a motorized stage (including piezo Z control) and a Nikon Perfect Focus autofocus system. Two digital cameras are mounted on this system: a Photometrics CoolSNAP HQ2 CCD camera for high-resolution imaging and an Andor iXon X3 EMCCD camera for ultra fast acquisition, ideal for 3D live cell imaging. A gas- and temperature- controlled stage-top incubator is incorporated into the system allowing long-term live imaging. The system is operated using NIS-Elements software.


Olympus Fluoview FV10i Laser scanning microscope

 

The Fluoview FV10i (or "confocal-in-a-box") is a self-contained confocal laser scanning microscope. It is outfitted with four laser diodes (405nm, 473nm, 635nm, 559nm) and uses a photomultiplier-based spectral system for detection. The 2 galvanometer scanning mirrors allows multichannel acquisition. It has a 10× air and a 60× oil immersion objectives lens with the possibility to zoom up to 10 times to provide highly resolved phase contrast and fluorescent confocal images (up to 0.027 μm/pixel).

The FV10i is equipped with an automatic detection of interface between specimen and cover glass by laser reflection light detection. This scope is suitable for fixed cell or tissue imaging.


Nikon C2 laser scanning confocal microscope

Nikon C2 laser scanning confocal microscope


The Nikon Laser scanning C2 system is a fully motorized inverted microscope, equipped with  four lasers (405, 488, 561, 640 nm), for confocal imaging, bright 20x, 60x and 100x objective lenses; DIC optics, a motorized stage (including piezo Z control) and a Nikon Perfect Focus autofocus system. The system is operated using NIS-Elements software.


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