Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/library/guides/biology/genbank.html

Introduction to GenBank

E. coli

The following tutorial will provide you with some basics regarding the use of GenBank in searching for bacterial genes. The principles can be applied to other organisms. By convention, the E. coli chromosome is numbered in one direction, yet genes can be found on both strands. Therefore, this tutorial will cover how to handle genes on either strand of the chromosome.


Mammalian

This tutorial will provide you with some basics regarding the use of GenBank in searching for mammalian genes, transcripts and proteins. The tutorial will focus on genes encoding a single transcript.


Mammalian with protein isoforms

This tutorial will provide you with some basics regarding the use of GenBank in searching for mammalian genes, transcripts and proteins. Since many eukaryotes contain introns and exons, multiple transcripts and protein isoforms can be produced from a single gene. This tutorial will show you such an example.


Resources for genetic disorders

Below are some websites and databases that can be helpful when looking up information about a specific human gene

  • PubMed: Look for the name of the disease and add the word genetics to the search. For example: alkaptonuria AND genetics
  • OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man): This database is a compendium of human genes and genetic phenotypes. Gene or disease records provide links to articles about gene structure, variants, molecular genetics, etc.
  • Medline Plus: Online encyclopedia of diseases and conditions. Gives links to reliable Internet sources on genetic information.
  • Merck Manual: Handbook with short entries on diseases, their genotype and phenotype.
  • Gene Reviews: Online book with inherited disease descriptions, their genetic origins, diagnosis and management.
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