Concordia University

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Deputy Provost

Lisa Ostiguy

Lisa Ostiguy

On July 1, 2013, Lisa Ostiguy assumed the newly-created position of deputy provost, reporting to the provost.

Ostiguy has been interim provost and vice-president, academic affairs, since September 1, 2012. She was previously interim vice-provost, teaching and learning from January 1 to June 30, 2012.

As deputy provost, Ostiguy will provide high-level support and advice to the provost on operational and strategic issues, and oversee the full range of student services and student recruitment activities. This includes the work of the dean of students, along with recreation and athletics. Ostiguy will also work in conjunction with the vice-provost, teaching and learning, to advance Concordia’s community engagement and experiential learning agenda.

Since 1992, Ostiguy has been a full-time faculty member at Concordia. While completing her doctorate degree in planning, policy and leadership at the University of Iowa, was an instructor in the Department of Physical Education Skills and in the Department of Sport, Health, Leisure and Physical Education. Prior to starting her doctoral degree, she was an assistant professor in the Department of Physical Activity Studies at the University of Regina.

Before her academic life began in 1988, Ostiguy worked in municipal leisure service administration, special events planning and therapeutic recreation in both clinical and community settings. Ostiguy has worked with a variety of different populations, including older adults, adults with mental illness, children with physical disabilities and adults with cognitive disabilities.

In spring of 2000, she received the Tommy Wilson Award for significant contributions to the recreations profession for people with disabilities, awarded by the American Association of Leisure and Recreation. Ostiguy is the co-author of a text titled, Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation: US and Canadian Perspectives, and has been invited to speak at numerous international, national and provincial conferences for therapeutic recreation.

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