Concordia University

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Upcoming Exhibitions


Mer paraguayenne / Paraguayan Sea
Andrew Forster & Erín Moure

August 21 to December 8, 2017
Mer paraguayenne / Paraguayan Sea
Mer paraguayenne/Paraguayan Sea is a text intervention into public space by Montreal visual artist Andrew Forster in collaboration with the Montreal poet Erín Moure. Installed outdoors, the wide yellow band wraps around the ground floor of Concordia University’s EV (Engineering and Visual Arts) Building, facing Ste-Catherine Street and McKay Street in downtown Montreal. This graphic and typographic artwork relays Moure’s poetic text, and moves between three languages (French, English and Guaraní) to create one meaning—an amalgam of language and meaning reflective of the creative ‘mix’ that is Montreal's urban hybridity.
Mer Paraguayenne

Tender for All
Corina Kennedy

September 11 to October 20, 2017
Tender for All
Corina Kennedy’s Tender for All explores themes of households, housing, love, and debts, both private and public. Taking cues from stone-carved walls of institutions, Kennedy hand carves a series of IOU notes on home insulation panels. Instead of distinguished lists of benefactors or quotable prose in marble, the texts are informal and written in the debtor’s voice, carefully cut into the low-grade foam—scrawled in tone but scrupulous in form.
Corina Kennedy

The Bejesus
Adrian Norvid

September 11 to October 20, 2017
The Bejesus
Adrian Norvid's The Bejesus is comprised of large format drawings, narrative tableaus, paper simulations and found objects that collectively explore decrepitude and the hapless. The exhibition is centered around a portable theatre set titled The Little Black Bumhole Opera. The theatre is a site for performances involving recitals of text and live, crude electronic soundscapes interwoven with the manipulation of elaborate paper props and gags.
Adrian Norvid

Minerva's Owl
Erin Weisgerber

September 11 to October 20, 2017
Minerva's Owl
For over 100 years, film shaped the way people remembered, dreamed, and saw the world. Today, industry has largely abandoned North America, and film-based cinema is nearly extinct as digital cinema has replaced it in most applications. Erin Weisgerber’s 16mm film installation, Minerva's Owl, captures the industrial era high-rise of the Kodak Tower in Rochester, New York, filmed over 24 hours. By separating, re-combining, and making visible the three-additive primary colours, the work references cinematic and photographic histories, with their early experiments in colour image reproduction. The looped cycle of day and night suggests the twin moments of the “dawn” and “dusk” of industrial film production and hints to the limited life-cycles of all communication technologies with the worlds they create and belong to.
Erin Weisgerber

Where does sound go, where does it come from
Sandra Volny

October 30 to December 8, 2017
Where does sound go, where does it come from
Where does sound go, where does it come from explores the distance and tension inherent in the intersection of sound and sight, of seeing what cannot be seen and only heard. Sandra Volny's video installation flips back and forth between seeing/hearing and listening/visualizing, relying on the white noise of the ocean as an auditory space for narratives of individual and collective imagination to emerge.
Sandra Volny
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