Concordia University

http://www.concordia.ca/content/concordia/en/artsci/psychology/programs/graduate/clinical-training/faculty-supervisors.html

Clinical faculty & supervisors


Clinical training program administration

See Department of Psychology administration and staff for the contact information of our clinical program administrators.

Applied Psychology Centre clincial supervisors

There are 15 faculty members responsible for the clinical training option and/or clinical psychology practica in the Applied Psychology Centre (APC). Their clinical interests and orientations are diverse and are briefly summarized below. APC clinical supervisors include core clinical faculty who also supervise research programs (indicated with an asterisk*), core clinicical faculty who do not supervise research programs, and selected other licensed clinical psychologists. Note that all research faculty (whether or not they also act as clinical superivsors) may supervise students in our graduate programs.

Linda Booij * Neuropsychosocial assessment
Lucie Bonneville psychodynamic/humanistic with individuals
Yves Beaulieu Assessment and treatment of child and adolescent disorders
Sam Burstein family systems interventions with children and families and cognitive behavioural therapy with individuals
Mark Ellenbogen * cognitive-behavioral therapy for mood disorders and addictions in adolescents and adults
Constantina Giannopoulos cognitive behavioural therapy with adults
Jean-Philippe Gouin * cognitive behavioural therapy for adults
Jennifer McGrath * empirically supported treatments, psychoeducational assessments, and health psychology in children and adolescents
Sydney Miller * cognitive behaviour therapy, behavioural medicine, and stress management
Roisin O'Connor * empirically supported treatments for addictions and mood and anxiety disorders in adolescents and adults
Virginia Penhune * neuropsychological assessment and rehabilitation counselling
Natalie Phillips * neuropsychological assessment
Adam Radomsky * cognitive-behavioural interventions for anxiety disorders (e.g., obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, specific phobia) and related disorders
Andrew Ryder * cognitive-behavioural treatment of emotional and interpersonal problems, particularly in people from cultural minority and/or migrant backgrounds
Dale Stack * assessment and treatment of disorders in children; problems in infancy and preschoolers (e.g., developmental delay, behavior and language problems, parent training)

Profiles of Applied Psychology Centre clincial supervisors

Lucie Bonneville

My clinical interests are in several areas such as depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety and psychotic symptoms.  My orientation is eclectic.  In general, I use techniques from the models of Humanistic, Psychodynamic, Existential and Cognitive therapies in short and long term psychotherapy with adults and late adolescents.


Sam Burstein, Clinical Psychologist at the Montreal Children’s Hospital and in private practice

My clinical experience lies mainly in the area of working with children and their families, wherein the presenting concern is child-related. Conceptualization and intervention directed at the family level stem from the belief that the family system is usually the most relevant and powerful in an individual's life.

Although a family system approach does not preclude working with an individual child/adolescent, it does assume that change in the client will have an important impact on other family members. Within the area of individual work, my bias is toward a cognitive-behavioral approach.


Mark Ellenbogen

My therapeutic orientation is predominantly based on the principles of cognitive-behavioral and interpersonal therapy. My clinical approach is to use empirically supported treatments that are tailored to fit the needs of individual clients.  My clinical interests include diagnostic assessment and individual psychotherapy, in adult and adolescent populations with major affective disorders, anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, and eating disorders.


Dina Giannopoulos

My clinical interests are in the areas of depression and anxiety disorders.  I supervise students who are interested in conducting cognitive-behaviour therapy with adults.  Emphasis is placed on empirically validated cognitive-behaviour therapy techniques.  The client-therapist relationship is also examined in supervision.


Jennifer Mcgrath

My therapeutic orientation is fundamentally guided by cognitive-behavioral principles and the use of empirically supported treatments while incorporating components of other orientations tailored to fit the needs of individual clients.  My clinical interests largely span the area of child health psychology to include Childhood Behavior Disorders, Developmental Disorders, Behavioral Medicine (Diabetes, Oncology/Cancer, Headache, Enuresis, Feeding/Eating Problems, Cardiovascular Disease, Sleep Disorders, Anxiety, Depression, Smoking Cessation, Medical Regimen Adherence, Coping with Chronic Illness, Coping with Stress), Psychoeducational Assessments, and Psychiatric Triage.  Students on my supervision team have the opportunity to learn how to conduct comprehensive psychoeducational assessments of children and adolescents as well as lead group therapy for parents and children with health related issues (e.g., sleep problems, smoking cessation, stress management).


Sydney Miller

I have two main areas of clinical interest which would be relevant for the subject populations likely to be seen at the clinic. In general, my therapeutic orientation in both these areas is cognitive behavioral. One area of interest is adult psychopathology involving a variety of problems including the anxiety disorders (e.g. agoraphobia, panic, social phobia, simple phobia), depression, couples with marital problems, assertiveness issues, and social skills training. Another area of interest is in adult health psychology. This involves the treatment of physical illness and related psychological problems. The type of clients who might be seen include individuals with weight problems, headaches, high blood pressure, back pain and insomnia.


Roisin O'Connor

My clinical interests include the assessment and treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders as the single presenting concern for adolescents and adults, or when co-morbid with substance use (i.e., alcohol use) concerns/disorders.  I am also interested in the assessment and treatment of pathological gambling.  I approach my clinical work as a scientist-practitioner. Accordingly, I draw on cognitive-behavioural therapy and other empirically supported treatments. I emphasize the use of theory-grounded case conceptualizations, hypothesis testing, and on-going data collection throughout treatment.  Some of the intervention strategies I use are skills training, cue exposure, response prevention, behavioural experiments, and cognitive reevaluations.  As well, I support the use of motivational interviewing techniques.


Virginia Penhune

The practicum in Neuropsychology is designed to teach students the fundamentals of neuropsychological assessment and to prepare them for external practica and internships in Neuropsychology or in domains that require familiarity with cognitive and neuropsychological assessment. 

The practicum will include a didactic and training period, covering basic theoretical issues in Neuropsychology as well as, test administration and scoring, clinical interview and report writing, as well as review of common medical tests relevant for neurological populations (i.e., MRI, CT, EEG).  During this time, students will practice tests with other students and with at least one normal volunteer.  One practice testing session will be videotaped and reviewed with the supervisor.

After satisfactorily completing the practice testing, students will go on to test 2-3 consecutive clinical patients over course of the year.  This will include reviewing the neuropsychological and neurological literature relevant to the particular disorder, putting together an appropriate battery of tests for each patient, administering the tests and writing a complete neuropsychological test report.


Natalie Phillips

The practicum in Neuropsychology is designed to teach students the fundamentals of neuropsychological assessment and to prepare them for external practica and internships in Neuropsychology or in domains that require familiarity with cognitive and neuropsychological assessment. 

The practicum will include a didactic and training period, covering basic theoretical issues in Neuropsychology as well as, test administration and scoring, clinical interview and report writing, as well as review of common medical tests relevant for neurological populations (i.e., MRI, CT, EEG).  During this time, students will practice tests with other students and with at least one normal volunteer.  One practice testing session will be videotaped and reviewed with the supervisor.

After satisfactorily completing the practice testing, students will go on to test 2-3 consecutive clinical patients over course of the year.  This will include reviewing the neuropsychological and neurological literature relevant to the particular disorder, putting together an appropriate battery of tests for each patient, administering the tests and writing a complete neuropsychological test report.


Adam Radomsky

My main areas of clinical interest are the assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders and related problems in adults. I use a cognitive-behavioural approach and support the use of this and other empirically validated treatments identified by the Canadian and American Psychological Associations. The practicum emphasizes the application of cognitive-behavioural models and methods, including: the development of a collaborative relationship, self-monitoring, exposure (both imaginal and in vivo), response prevention, relaxation techniques, behavioural experiments, hypothesis testing, cognitive/belief investigations, habit reversal, evaluation of treatment gains and relapse prevention. These and other strategies will be applied to a variety of anxiety disorders and related problems.


Andrew Ryder

My therapeutic orientation is predominantly cognitive-behavioural, influenced by the existential perspective on the person and the ultimate goals of therapy, and by the interpersonal perspective at the level of moment-to-moment interactions between therapist and client. As a scientist-practitioner, I take an evidence-based approach, meaning that specific interventions are informed both by the published literature and by evidence obtained over the course of a specific case (e.g., assessments, mood diaries, observation). I tend to supervise cases where the client is presenting with emotional and/or interpersonal problems (e.g., acculturative stress, adjustment disorder, anxiety, depression, interpersonal conflict), with a particular specialty in clients from a cultural minority and/or migrant background.


Lisa Serbin

My research and clinical interests focus on developmental psychopathology and children's health. Specifically, I am interested in disorders of childhood, and in the environmental and social contexts in which children's development takes place. My clinical supervision focuses on the assessment and treatment of children referred for learning, emotional, social and behavioral problems. The focus is on the child, the family, and the environment (including daycare, school, and home settings). Assessment and treatment typically focus on the development of age-appropriate social and cognitive skills, as well as on emotional, behavioral and family problems, with treatment modality determined by the needs of the case. In recent years children have been seen under my supervision for problems including learning disabilities, developmental disabilities, behavior and attentional disorders, conduct disorder, depression, and anxiety disorders. Students under my direction have learned to use cognitive-behavioral therapy, play therapy, crisis management, and family therapy approaches, and to integrate these diverse theoretical models in developing effective strategies for intervention.


Dale Stack

My clinical experience is in the area of assessment and treatment of difficulties that occur in children (and their families).    My particular focus is working with very young children (preschoolers) and their families.   This area encompasses a range of problems including (but not limited to) developmental delays, expressive and/or receptive language delays, pervasive developmental disorders, behavior problems, sensory and physical disabilities, adjustment difficulties, child management and parenting, and family issues.   My general approach is cognitive-behavioral.   I underscore the importance of comprehensive assessment and I utilize alternative assessment procedures when valuable (e.g., non-verbal, non-compliant, etc.,).   Given the age range of the children, my clinical work involves direct contact with the child and his/her parent(s)/caregivers (and family).


Back to top

© Concordia University